Religion talks in London

Jan
9
Wed
What every parent needs to know about Steiner schools – w/@lecanardnoir
Jan 9 @ 7:30 pm

The last decade has seen several ‘new religious movements’ create publicly funded Free Schools. Maharishi and Steiner Schools are perhaps the most prominent. It is timely to look closely at the origins and beliefs of Rudolf Steiner, the founder of the occult movement of Anthroposophy. Steiner was a mystic who believed he had direct clairvoyant access to cosmic knowledge. As such he developed an esoteric belief system based on karma, reincarnation, astrology, homeopathy and gnomes. His visions gave insights into architecture, art, dance, agriculture, medicine, education, science and diet. His racial hierarchy of spiritual development resonated in Germany in the early 20th Century turning a personal belief into a worldwide movement. Today we find hundreds of anthroposophically inspired organisations in the UK alone: everything from Steiner Schools, Biodynamic farms to banks, pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies, charities and cheese makers.

Andy Lewis has been trying to lift the veil on the inner secrets of the movement and will discuss how this secretive movement has direct impact on public life.

 

Jan
29
Tue
Looking Forward: The Next Ten Years
Jan 29 @ 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm

 

What key aspects of our lives are predicted to shift radically over the next ten years?

As Bloomsbury celebrates ten years of outstanding publishing as Bloomsbury Academic, we’ve invited some of our most fascinating authors to fill us in on the opportunities, challenges and biggest changes coming to our lives in the next ten years.

Come along as our experts present their most ground-breaking ideas in the Humanities and Social Sciences in a series of short talks, and group discussion, to tell us what lies ahead. Their collective years of research and writing means we’ll all benefit from their educated insights into the future of our world.

Covering sustainability, terrorism, geopolitics, gender, religion, education and philosophy – what are the key issues and how can we prepare for the changes and challenges that lie ahead? Come with us as we aim beyond the regular predictions and leave you thinking differently about our shared future.

Event Speakers:

  • Rachel Reeves MP
  • Kerry Brown
  • Julia Ebner
  • Dr. Leslie Davis Burns
  • James G. Crossley
  • Constantine Sandis
  • Viv Ellis

Our speakers will each deliver a short talk and then take part in a live Q&A panel, hosted by Jamie Bartlett, author of Radicals and The People vs. Tech, tech blogger and Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media for cross-party think-tank Demos in conjunction with The University of Sussex.

We hope to see you there. Take advantage of places for just £8.00 if you book your place before Friday, November 30th

May
21
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (The Trouble with Venetian Painting) 3/8
May 21 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (The Trouble with Venetian Painting) 3/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

The Trouble With Venetian Painting

Why the Renaissance could only be a Florentine/Giorgio Vasari and the Critical Appraisal of Venetian Art (1500-1594)

To this very day Florence is not only seen but is the self-proclaimed city of the Renaissance. But how did it receive this exulted status which it so jealously guards? We will look at the powerhouse of Renaissance art that is the city of Venice and why it never historically achieved the same accolade as Florence. We will also look at how art criticism can and did have a profound and long-lasting effect on how Venetian art was and still is perceived.

Jun
4
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vasari and Michelangelo) 4/8
Jun 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vasari and Michelangelo) 4/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Giorgio Vasari and ‘The Divine Michelangelo’

The Signature Projects and their critical reception (1494-1564)

In his time, Michelangelo was the most written about artist and also the first to have literature published about him in his own lifetime. We will look at the uneasy relationship between Michelangelo, the artist and Giorgio Vasari, the art historian, as well as others who wrote about him. How did such adulation affect him and his work? We will also look at the development of the man through his most iconic works and evaluate their criticism through writing that survives and is still in publication.

Jul
2
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis 8/8
Jul 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis 8/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

A Catalyst for Change in Art Appreciation

From Pre-Raphaelitism & Ruskin to Impressionism, Modernity & Roger Fry (1848 – 1910)

Revolutionary iconoclasts or traditionalist in disguise? The artists in this final session seem hell-bent on causing offence and to be deliberately counter-culture just for the sake of it. Was this in reality their modus operandi or was there more to it? This session looks at two different approaches to modernity from both sides of the Chanel which changed the course of art history forever. In England, we will look at the Pre-Raphaelites and their relationship with John Ruskin and on the French side of the Chanel, the Impressionists and their critical reception. In both cases, the role of the critic, be it supportive or not, was crucial in establishing the reputation of these groups of artists. This session will also explore the tensions between artists and critics in what would become known as modern painting.

Oct
2
Wed
Witchcraft and the Law in England (w/ Deborah Hyde @jourdemayne)
Oct 2 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

The legal approach to witchcraft in England changed considerably over the course of 700 years, reflecting the philosophy, power struggles and politics of each era. At first deprecated as an ignorant superstition, belief in the power of witchcraft eventually became established – even among the most educated.

Deborah Hyde has been Editor-in-Chief of The Skeptic Magazine for over five years. She speaks regularly at conventions, on podcasts and on international broadcast media about why people believe in the supernatural – especially the malign supernatural – using a combination of history and psychology. She thinks that superstition and religion are natural – albeit not ideal – ways of looking at the world.

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/