May
25
Thu
‘The ecology of war: an evolutionary perspective on conflict over resources and prospects for peace’ with Prof Dominic Johnson @ Oxford Martin School
May 25 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Competition over resources and territory is not just a feature of modern or historical times, but a recurrent theme in the natural world, and a phenomenon that reaches far back in human evolutionary history. While modern conflict has many unique qualities, common patterns across species and time suggest important fundamental insights about human nature and social organisation that may help to address modern problems, especially those which are hard to resolve.

Oxford Philosophy Forum @ Vernoon Harcourt Room, St Hilda's College
May 25 @ 5:15 pm – 6:45 pm

Launch and discussion of Mari Mikkola’s new book, ‘The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and its Role in Feminist Philosophy’

Free money for all: a capitalist utopia @ The Mitre
May 25 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Free money for all: a capitalist utopia @ The Mitre | England | United Kingdom

Free money for all: a capitalist utopia

Talk followed by questions and discussion

All welcome

May
26
Fri
The Old Silk Road: Retracing Steps toward One Belt One Road @ Wolfson College
May 26 all-day
The Old Silk Road: Retracing Steps toward One Belt One Road @ Wolfson College | England | United Kingdom

In this opening workshop in the One Belt One Road programme, a multidisplinary group of scholars will reassess the Old Silk Road, the centuries-old, pan-continental trading route that helped to establish China as a world superpower.

As the current Chinese government plans the resurrection of this route as part of its efforts to regain that status in the twenty-first century, we will trace the legal implications for such an ambitious international enterprise. The initiative, known as One Belt One Road, will span countries across several continents, which serve as home to almost two-thirds of the world’s population, and account for one-third of the world’s wealth.

The project will study the legal and regulatory framework that will be required by such an ambitious cross-border initiative to harmonize the various legal regimes of the countries affected. In doing so, it will examine a wide range of issues, including the protection and exchange of cultural property, international dispute resolution mechanisms, and the harmonization of competing jurisdictions and judicial traditions.

To register, please complete the form on the right.

Participants include:
Denis Galligan, Professor of Socio-Legal Studies, Oxford

Ying Yu, Research Fellow in Law Justice and Society, Oxford

Donna Kurtz, Professor of Classical Art, Oxford

Troy Steinberg, Researcher, School of Geography and the Environment

Key hole implantation of a new aortic valve in the conscious patient: TAVI in 2017 @ Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital
May 26 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am
Key hole implantation of a new aortic valve in the conscious patient: TAVI in 2017 @ Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital | England | United Kingdom

As part of the Surgical Grand Rounds lecture series, Professor Adrian Banning, along with Professor Raj Kharbanda, Dr Kate Grebenik, Mr George Krasopolous, Mr Rana Sayeed, will talk about ‘Key hole implantation of a new aortic valve in the conscious patient: TAVI in 2017.’

Professor Banning has been a Consultant Interventional Cardiologist at the John Radcliffe since 1999. He uses coronary stents to treat patients with angina and heart attack and since 2009 has been implanting new aortic valves (TAVI) from the femoral artery. This technology continues to transform treatment of valvular disease to the extent that day case replacement of a heart valve is “just around the corner”.

Professor Eleanor Stein & Cecil Corbin-Mark: “Climate Change, Human Rights and the Way Forward” @ Lecture Theatre, Mansfield College
May 26 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Eleanor Stein (University of Albany), is a former Administrative Judge and recently retire from NY State Public Service Commission as project manager for Reforming the Energy Vision. Cecil Corbin-Mark has represented WE ACT and environmental justice interests for more than a decade. He served as a member of the planning team and a moderator of a climate change panel for the first White House Forum on Environmental Justice

St Hilda’s Feminist Salon @ St Hilda's College
May 26 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

The St Hilda’s Feminist Salon is a space to bridge the gap between feminist theory and practice, and to discuss the complexities of feminism today. A speaker from the cutting-edge of feminist theory, art and activism will be asked to act as guest host at each Salon. On 26 May 2017, our Feminist Salon will be hosted by Fatou Wurie (founder of the Survivor Dream Project and President of Oxford Women in Politics).

May
27
Sat
Lives of Houses @ Wolfson College
May 27 all-day
Lives of Houses @ Wolfson College | England | United Kingdom

A one-day colloquium convened by Oliver Cox & Sandra Mayer, and hosted by OCLW in collaboration with TORCH will bring together academics, biographers and curators to explore the ways in which the life stories of well-known individuals are preserved and presented through the architecture and material culture of their homes. Talks on musicians’, architects’ and writers’ houses will focus on the intersections of life-writing and notions of fame and celebrity through physical spaces and objects. A plenary lecture by Daisy Hay on “Writing Space in Mr and Mrs Disraeli and Dinner with Joseph Johnson” and papers by:

• Gillian Darley (Sir John Soane)
• Lucy Walker (Benjamin Britten’s The Red House)
• James Grasby (Edward Elgar Birthplace)
• Alexandra Harris (William Cowper, John Clare and Virginia Woolf)
• Frankie Kubicki (Charles Dickens Museum)
• Nicola Watson (Shakespeare’s New Place)

Finally, a round table featuring Head of Specialist Advice for the National Trust, Nino Strachey, biographer and broadcaster Alexandra Harris, and art historian and curator Serena Dyer, the expert panel will cast a spotlight on the strategies available to those who open and present these houses to the public today.

May
30
Tue
Jamal al-din al-Afghani and Syed Ahmad Khan: Reform, Rivalry, and Heresy in late 19th century India @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College
May 30 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Jamal al-din al-Afghani and Syed Ahmad Khan: Reform, Rivalry, and Heresy in late 19th century India @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

This talk examines the writings of Jamal al-din al-Afghani (1838-1897) with particular attention to his polemical piece against Syed Ahmad Khan (1817-1898), entitled “The Refutation of the Materialists” (1881). Scholars have assumed that al-Afghani was anti-imperial and wrote this diatribe because Syed Ahmad Khan was pro-British. It is the speaker’s intention to show that al-Afghani was not consistently anti-imperial, and in fact shared with Syed Ahmad Khan many similar views on the role of science, education, and progress. Teena Purohit reads “The Refutation” and ancillary treatises to show how al-Afghani invokes the idiom of heresy for his arguments about reform: on the one hand, al-Afghani mounts an accusation of heresy against Syed Ahmad Khan and his followers, and on the other hand, he deploys “heretical” concepts to rationalize and legitimize his aspiration to serve as a redemptive leader for all Muslims.

Fanon Transformed? The New Writings @ Pavilion Room, St Antony's College
May 30 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Fanon Transformed? The New Writings @ Pavilion Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

In this talk Robert Young will be discussing the new volume of writings by Frantz Fanon, edited by Jean Khalfa and the speaker, the first new material by Fanon to be published in over 60 years. Professor Young will argue that its contribution is to place Fanon’s psychiatry at the theoretical centre of his work, enabling a clear connection to be draw between the early work of Black Skin, White Masks (1952), and The Wretched of the Earth (1961). For Fanon, colonialism, like madness, was most meaningfully conceptualized as a destructuration of consciousness and as a pathology of freedom.

Professor James W. Earl: “Beowulf the Obscure” @ Old Common Room, Balliol College
May 30 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm
May
31
Wed
‘The Optician of Lampedusa – opening the world’s eyes to the human story behind mass migration’ – Emma Jane Kirby, BBC correspondent and author of the ‘Optician of Lampedusa’ @ Barclay Room, Green Templeton College
May 31 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Reuters Institute seminars “The business and practice of journalism”
The following seminars will be given at 2pm on Wednesdays, normally in the Barclay Room, Green Templeton College.
Convenors: James Painter, Richard Sambrook

Emma Jane Kirby, BBC correspondent and author of the ‘Optician of Lampedusa’
31 May: ‘The Optician of Lampedusa – opening the world’s eyes to the human story behind mass migration’

Max Watson Annual Lecture: Ethical Business Practice and Regulation @ Wolfson College
May 31 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Max Watson Annual Lecture: Ethical Business Practice and Regulation @ Wolfson College | England | United Kingdom

Christopher Hodges, Professor of Justice Systems, will deliver the 2017 Max Watson Annual Lecture to present his proposals to support an ethical basis for business practice and regulation.

Professor Hodges will present his research into the concept of Ethical Business Regulation (EBR), which aims to foster a business culture of mutual engagement, respect, learning, and constant improvement, based on social trust.

He will ask:

How do we stem the flow of corporate scandals (recently Rolls Royce, VW), save money on regulators (Better Regulation), and improve effective ‘compliance’, whilst observing the new ‘growth duty’?
Does the answer lie in deterrence, or behavioural psychology/economics, or structures (such as the Primary Authority scheme or ‘regulated self-assurance’), or ‘no blame’ cultures (such as aviation safety), or embedding ethical values?
The lecture will be a wide-ranging tour d’horizon of current theories and enforcement practice, and apply socio-legal empirical analysis to the evidence, with answers that some will find challenging.

It will build on Professor Hodges’ ideas previously published by the UK Government in their Review of Ethics for Regulators conducted by the Committee on Standards in Public Life, and in his FLJS Policy Brief, Ethical Business Regulation.

To reserve your place, please complete the form.

The Max Watson Memorial Lecture was established in 2015 to commemorate the life of Max Watson (1946–2014), FLJS Board Member and Fellow of Wolfson and St Antony’s Colleges.

Jun
2
Fri
Business and Human Rights: Lessons from the Bodo Community v Shell @ Pembroke College
Jun 2 @ 1:45 pm – 3:00 pm

The OxHRH with the support of the Bertha Foundation, is pleased to continue its innovative webinar series with an exciting webinar from leading barrister, Dan Leader (Leigh Deigh) on the complex relationship between business and human rights.

Is business a threat to human rights? Or an enabler of human rights? Some see business in our world today as a threat — institutions that undermine workers’ rights and interfere with governments. Others see business as an enabler of human rights — job creators, innovators and supporters of social mobility. So, cutting through these differences, what are the real human rights issues that relate to business? Are human rights a business benefit or burden?

Dan Leader is a barrister and Partner at Leigh Day with over 15 years litigation experience. Leigh Day’s international department specialises in ground-breaking international human rights and environmental litigation with a particular focus on group actions by claimants from the developing world. Over the past decade Leigh Day has successfully brought group claims on behalf of individuals and communities around the world (including from Nigeria, Kenya, Ivory Coast, South Africa, Columbia and Peru) against a range of multinational corporations such as Shell, BP, Anglo-American, Barrick Gold and Trafigura.

Dan Leader will explain the nature of Leigh Day’s international work, with a particular focus on the recently concluded Bodo Community v Shell litigation, in which Leigh Day secured compensation for 15,000 Nigerian fishermen whose livelihoods had been destroyed by repeated oil spills. This seminar will cover core features of these claims, including parent company liability, jurisdictional challenges and applicable law. He will situate Leigh Day’s work within the broader business and human rights debate and, in particular, the current focus on access to remedy.

The webinar is unique in that it will allow academics, students, policy-makers from all over the world to participate in the OxHRH seminars. Participants will be able to listen and interact with Dan Leader. This will be an interactive webinar where participants will be asked throughout the seminar to provide their opinion on key aspects of current development in business and human rights which will then be included in the seminar. Following the seminar, there will be a questions and answer session.

Participants can submit their questions via the Oxford Human Rights Hub twitter account @OxHRH or they can email questions to oxfordhumanrightshub@law.ox.ac.uk.

To participate in the live webinar, visit the events tab on our wesbite from 2pm (UK time) on 2 June 2017.

For those in Oxford, please do participate as a live audience member! If you are able to participate, we kindly ask that you arrive by 1:45pm at Harold Lee Boardroom, Pembroke College.

Solving the Replication Crisis in Psychology: Insights from History and Philosphy of Science @ Oxford Martin School
Jun 2 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

In a much-discussed New York Times article, psychologist Lisa Feldman Barrett claimed, “Psychology is not in crisis.” She was responding to the results of a large-scale initiative called the Reproducibility Project, published in Science magazine, which appeared to show that the results from over 60% of a sample of 100 psychology studies did not hold up when independent labs attempted to replicate them. In this talk, I address three major issues:

(1) What did the Reproducibility Project really show, and in what specific sense can the follow-up studies meaningfully be described as “failures to replicate” the original findings? I argue that, contrary to what many are suggesting, very little can be learned about the validity of the original studies based upon a single (apparent) failure to replicate: instead, multiple replications (of sufficient quality) of each contested experiment would be needed before any strong conclusions could be drawn about the appropriate degree of confidence to be placed in the original findings. To make this point I draw on debates over falsification in philosophy of science, paying special attention to the role of auxiliary assumptions in falsifying claims or theories.

(2) Is psychology in crisis or not? And if so, what kind of crisis? I tease apart two senses of crisis here. The first sense is “crisis of confidence,” which is a descriptive or sociological claim referring to the notion that many people, within the profession and without, are as a matter of fact experiencing a profound and, in some ways, unprecedented lack of confidence in the validity of the published literature. This is true not only in psychology, but in other fields such as medicine as well. Whether these people are justified in feeling this way is a separate but related question, and the answer depends on a number of factors, to be discussed. The second sense of “crisis” is “crisis of process” – i.e., the notion that (due in large part to apparent failures to replicate a substantial portion of previously published findings), psychological science is “fundamentally broken,” or perhaps not even a “true” science at all. This notion would be based on the assumption that most or perhaps even all of the findings in a professionally published literature should “hold up” when they are replicated, in order for a discipline to be a “true” science, or not to be in a state of “crisis” in this second sense. But this assumption, I will argue, is erroneous: failures of various sorts in science, including bona fide failures to replicate published results, are often the wellspring of important discoveries and other innovations. Therefore, (apparent) replication failure, even on a wide scale, is no evidence that science/psychology is broken, per se. Nevertheless,

(3) This does not mean that there is not substantial room for serious, even radical improvements to be made in the conduct of psychological science. In fact, the opposite is true. Even setting the Reproducibility Project findings aside, there was already substantial–and more direct–evidence that current research and publication practices in psychology and other disciplines were and are systematically flawed, and that the published literature had and has a high likelihood of containing a large proportion of false “findings” and erroneous conclusions. Problems that need urgently to be addressed include: publication bias against “negative” results, the related “file drawer” problem, sloppy statistics and lack of adequate statistical training among many scientists, small sample sizes, inefficient and arbitrary peer review, and so on.

Populism as a Global Form: A Roundtable Conversation @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College
Jun 2 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Populism as a Global Form: A Roundtable Conversation @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

A Roundtable Conversation with Akeel Bilgrami (Sidney Morgenbesser Professor of Philosophy, Columbia University), Shruti Kapila (Fellow and Director of Studies, Corpus Christi College; Faculty of History, University of Cambridge) and Saeed Naqvi (Foreign Correspondent and Author).

Orgnaised by the TORCH Rethinking the Contemporary: The World since the Cold War Network in collaboration with the Oxford Centre for Global History, the Modern European History Centre and the Asian Studies Centre of St Antony’s College.

Professor Carol Sanger: “Images and Influence: The Fetus in Art” @ Lecture Theatre, Mansfield College
Jun 2 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Carol Sanger, is the Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law at Columbia University.

Jun
5
Mon
Translation Seminar + Translation Slam @ Weston Library
Jun 5 @ 3:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Speakers include Jennifer Arnold (Birmingham University), Tom Boll (UEA) and Richard Mansell (Exeter University). The event will end with a translation ‘slam’, moderated by Peter Bush. Literary translators Rosalind Harvey and Sophie Hughes will each argue for their versions of a chosen extract from Mónica Ojeda’s Nefando (Candaya, 2016).

‘An age old problem? Exploring Britain’s new wealth divides’ @ Oxford Martin School
Jun 5 @ 4:00 pm – 5:30 pm

This event is in partnership with the Resolution Foundation

The accumulation and distribution of wealth across Britain has been a contentious issue since the dawn of economics. But while wealth inequality is traditionally viewed as being between rich and poor, a new divide is also emerging – the wealth gap between generations.

The failure of younger generations to accumulate wealth – through pensions, property and savings – will reduce their lifetime living standards, particularly once they reach retirement. This would have profound implications for both families and the state, so what can be done?

As part of its Intergenerational Commission, chaired by Lord Willetts, the Resolution Foundation will soon be publishing a series of papers analysing Britain’s wealth across generations. Ahead of this launch, the Oxford Martin School is hosting an event to explore these issues and the role of public policy in tackling Britain’s new wealth divides.

Experts from the Foundation will present some of the emerging findings from its work on intergenerational wealth inequality, while Professors John Muellbauer and Brian Nolan will discuss possible policy responses, before taking part in an audience Q&A.

The Dismissal of a Teacher and Academic Freedom: An Annal of early Calcutta and its Echoes @ Pavilion Room, St Antony's College
Jun 5 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
The Dismissal of a Teacher and Academic Freedom: An Annal of early Calcutta and its Echoes @ Pavilion Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Speaker: Rudrangshu Mukherjee (Vice-Chancellor, Ashoka University).
This lecture is co-organised by the Asian Studies Centre of St Antony’s College, the Free Speech Debate Project – a research project of the Dahrendorf Programme for the Study of Freedom at St Antony’s College – and the Oxford Department of International Development.

Sensible answers to strange questions: generating evidence in special circumstances @ University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education
Jun 5 @ 5:15 pm – 6:15 pm
Sensible answers to strange questions: generating evidence in special circumstances @ University of Oxford Department for Continuing Education | England | United Kingdom

Designing a study usually involves consulting a statistician, typically to check the sample size is adequate and the analysis feasible. In this talk, however, I will discuss my role in the design of some studies that were definitely not typical. I will discuss the ways that some unusual research questions, in alcohol, in clinician behaviour and in alternative medicine, have led me to get involved with some interesting study designs. I will describe my experiences of leaving my statistician’s desk and computer to help collect data in the very real world and present some of the unusual papers that our students have contributed to on blood pressure measurement, alcohol and sobriety, and thermometry.

This talk is part of the Introduction to Study Design and Research Methods module, which is part of the MSc in Evidence-Based Health Care.

This is a free event and members of the public are welcome to attend.

Jun
6
Tue
The Untouchable Citizen @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College
Jun 6 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
The Untouchable Citizen @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Exploring the emotional terrain of the citizenship experiences of groups in Goa this paper will argue that through the linguistic choices made by the government of Goa it is not merely caste that is at the centre of citizenship experiences but in fact untouchability itself. Given that languages are not abstract forms but actively embodied practices, and that their linguistic forms and cultural productions are marked as impure and hence untouchable in the caste-Hindu centric Goan polity it is the lower-caste Catholic that is at the bottom of the pile. What obtains in Goa is not different from many other parts in India, allowing the suggestion that India is marked not an egalitarian, but a casteist polity.

‘Disruptive oil and electricity futures’ with Amory Lovins @ Oxford Martin School
Jun 6 @ 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm

Oil suppliers have more unsellable than unburnable oil: they are more at risk from competition than from climate regulation. Electricity suppliers too, face a swarm of disruptors that will transform their business beyond recognition. As these two vast industries merge and as insurgents in both challenge incumbents, almost everything we thought we knew about energy is ripe for rapid and profound change. In this lecture, physicist and innovator Amory Lovins will consider the changing face of the energy market.

The Ethics of Gene Editing of Humans @ The Lecture Theatre, St Cross College
Jun 6 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Professor Julian Savulescu, St Cross Fellow, Director of the Institute for Science and Ethics and Co-Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on Geoengineering.

Free, all welcome. No booking required.

New Perspectives on the Psalms: Roger Wagner, ‘Illustrating the Psalms’ @ Ursell Room, Pusey House
Jun 6 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm

Among all the books of the Bible the psalms have provided a unique spur to human creativity. In the Christian tradition particularly this has not only involved musical settings but also illuminations and illustrations. In this lecture Roger Wagner will explore some of the reasons for this with particular reference to his own ongoing illustrated translation of the psalms.

Jun
7
Wed
‘Producing news videos that young people care about’ – Sakhr Al-Makhadhi, Acting Executive Producer, AJ+ @ Barclay Room, Green Templeton College
Jun 7 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Reuters Institute seminars “The business and practice of journalism”
The following seminars will be given at 2pm on Wednesdays, normally in the Barclay Room, Green Templeton College.
Convenors: James Painter, Richard Sambrook

Sakhr Al-Makhadhi, Acting Executive Producer, AJ+
7 Jun: ‘Producing news videos that young people care about’

Time Tribes: How the Railways Made Communities (1840-1900) @ Seminar Room 3, St Anne's College, Woodstock Road
Jun 7 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Time Tribes: How the Railways Made Communities (1840-1900) @ Seminar Room 3, St Anne's College, Woodstock Road  | England | United Kingdom

Science, Medicine and Culture in the 19th Century seminar series. All welcome, no booking required.

Professor Oliver Zimmer, University of Oxford will be speaking on Time Tribes: How The Railways Made Communities (1840-1900)

When it comes to modern loyalties, scholars of various disciplines have predominantly looked at class, profession, region or nation. While these no doubt represent important sources of identity, in the long nineteenth century TIME emerged as a significant source of individual and collective self-definition. Increasingly, how people related to and made use of their own time marked out their actual and desired status. Time, that most elusive of matters, became instrumental for the making and unmaking of communities that sometimes transcended regional and national contexts. Much of this can be attributed to the railways and the temporal innovations they facilitated, above all standard time and railway timetables. This paper approaches the phenomenon in question – time tribes – through an investigation of British and German railway passengers.

Safeguarding child wellbeing @ JHB Main Lecture Theatre
Jun 7 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Safeguarding child wellbeing @ JHB Main Lecture Theatre | England | United Kingdom

Professor Jane Appleton’s open lecture examines the public health role of health visitors and why they are needed to promote child welfare and wellbeing. Health visiting was established more than 150 years ago and provides a universal and public health preventative service to pre-school children and families.

Jun
9
Fri
The spread of Greek Philosophy to Persia, Syria, Baghdad, Spain and cross-cultural philosophy in Mughal India @ Haldane Room, Wolfson College
Jun 9 @ 2:00 pm – 5:30 pm
The spread of Greek Philosophy to Persia, Syria, Baghdad, Spain and cross-cultural philosophy in Mughal India @ Haldane Room, Wolfson College | England | United Kingdom

Speakers:
Richard Sorabji
Honorary Fellow, Wolfson College
Peter Adamson
Professor of Ancient and Medieval Philosophy, King’s College London

Schedule:
2-3.30: Professor Sir Richard Sorabji
3.30-4: Tea break
4-5.30: Professor Peter Adamson

Jun
10
Sat
The Nature of Quantum Reality @ St. Cross College
Jun 10 all-day

As the great Niels Bohr famously remarked “Anyone who is not shocked by Quantum Theory has not understood it”. Even today approximately a century after the extended formulation of Quantum Theory, its foundations continue to puzzle and perplex us. The spooky action at a distance of quantum entanglement eludes rational explanation. A quantum cat can be both dead and alive. The reconciliation of the theory with that of gravity remains unsolved. Yet despite these theoretical issues, quantum theory has provided scores of spectacularly accurate measurements and has led to a host of everyday devices used all over the world. This conference will explore the origins, achievements and technological developments from this all pervasive theory.