Nov
20
Mon
Hippocampal Dynamics and Memory Processing, Thanos Siapas @ Oxford Martin School
Nov 20 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Disability and Education – Meet the challenge of disability in schools and universities @ St Anne's College
Nov 20 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Disability and Education - Meet the challenge of disability in schools and universities @ St Anne's College | England | United Kingdom

This seminar aims to address the difficulties met by disabled students and teachers in school and university and to hear more about what we can all do to ensure that those meeting such challenges enjoy the fullest possible access to education. The three speakers have direct personal experience of this issue and will share with the audience some of what has been done – and can still be done in future – to ensure that the education system allows disabled students the chance to thrive.

Speakers will include:

Dr Marie Tidball (Faculty of Criminology and Wadham College)
Luke Barbanneau (Teacher of Physics, Cherwell School)
Noah McNeill (Music Student and JCR Disability Representative, St Anne’s College)
All are welcome to attend.

Tales from Two Prime Ministers: Gordon Brown launches Kevin Rudd’s memoirs @ The Oxford Union
Nov 20 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
Tales from Two Prime Ministers: Gordon Brown launches Kevin Rudd’s memoirs @ The Oxford Union | England | United Kingdom

During the global financial crisis, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown and Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd were two of the world’s most important political leaders. Together they helped establish the G20 Leaders’ Summit and through that led the global recovery effort. In their own countries, each championed ambitious and ground-breaking progressive reforms and have been tireless in their advocacy on the global stage, including to this day.

Join them a decade later as they are reunited in conversation in Oxford for the UK launch of the first volume of Kevin Rudd’s memoirs, Not for the Faint-hearted: A personal reflection on life, politics and purpose.

Copies of Kevin Rudd’s book will be available to collect on the evening for the special price of £15. All books must be purchased in advance–there will be no sales on the night.

All proceeds from ticket and book sales will be donated to the National Apology Foundation for Indigenous Australians.

Mr. Rudd will be available after the event for book signings.

***

Entry is free for members of the Oxford Union.
Non-members must purchase a ticket for £5.
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/tales-from-two-prime-ministers-gordon-brown-launches-kevin-rudds-memoirs-tickets-39663795480

Emily Wilson: The Odyssey @ Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre
Nov 20 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Emily Wilson: The Odyssey @ Lecture Theatre, Ioannou Centre | England | United Kingdom

Emily Wilson (University of Pennsylvania), will give a reading from her new translation of Homer’s Odyssey – the first by a female translator. Free, all welcome, no booking required. Copies of the book will be available to buy.

Nov
21
Tue
The British High Commission in Pakistan 1947-65: Role and History @ Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum
Nov 21 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
The British High Commission in Pakistan 1947-65: Role and History @ Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum | England | United Kingdom

The paper examines the roles of three influential heads of the British High Commission in Pakistan’s early post-independence history, Sir Gilbert Laithwaite (1951-4), Sir Alexander Symon (1954-61) and Sir Morrice James (1961-5). In particular it reveals the ways in which they undertook the important tasks of political reporting, mediating in the Indo-Pakistan conflict and protecting British interests at times of civil and regional conflict.

Ian Talbot is Professor of History at the University of Southampton where he was formerly Head of Department and Director of the Centre for Imperial and Post-Colonial Studies. He was educated at Royal Holloway College, University of London where he obtained a First in Modern History, Economic History and Politics and was awarded a PhD for his thesis on ‘The Growth of the Muslim League in the Punjab 1937-1946.’ He obtained his MA from the University of Oxford where he was a Visiting Research Fellow in History at Balliol College in 2004-5. He has published and researched extensively in the fields of Colonial Punjab History, the Partition of India and the History of Pakistan. The work Punjab and the Raj 1849-1947 was a pioneering study at the time of its publication by Manohar in 1988. His recent publications include The Deadly Embrace: Religion, Politics and Violence in India and Pakistan 1947-2002 (ed., OUP 2007); Divided Cities: Partition and Its aftermath in Lahore and Amritsar 1947-1957 (OUP 2006); Pakistan A Modern History (3rd ed. Hurst 2009) (Pakistan: A New History (Hurst, 2012); The Partition of India (with Gurharpal Singh, CUP 2009). He is currently working on a project on the history of the UK High Commission in Pakistan.

The South Asia Seminar is co-funded by the Ashmolean Museum, the Asian Studies Centre of St Antony’s College, the Contemporary South Asian Studies Programme at the School of Interdisciplinary Area Studies, the Department for International Development and Faculty of History and the Faculty of Oriental Studies.

Like a family? Values, Hierarchies and Child Labour in Myanmar’s Small Businesses Sector @ Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College
Nov 21 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Like a family? Values, Hierarchies and Child Labour in Myanmar’s Small Businesses Sector @ Dahrendorf Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Drawing on ethnographic data gathered in Pathein, Myanmar, the paper investigates the moral underpinnings of responsibilities and hierarchies in small businesses, specifically the question of what makes a good employer. It will show how responsibilities beyond the mere paying of wages do not overcome the socio-economic gap between workers and employers, and that essentially, the shop floor remains an arena of control and inequality. The main case study is a tea shop, where a large part of the workforce is underage. Incorporating the perspectives of employers, workers and their families, customers, and agents, this talk will outline the complex moral arguments surrounding the employment of children and children’s roles as economic actors.

Laura Hornig is a PhD Candidate at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Halle (Germany), specializing in economic anthropology. She is also a co-founder of the Berlin-based think tank “Myanmar-Institut e.V.”

Lives and Letters @ Wolfson College
Nov 21 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

This discussion centres on an understanding and appreciation of letters as repositories of complex meaning, creating unique possibilities that weave together the textual, visual, material, biographical, and cultural. Robert Douglas-Fairhurst and Matt Bevis, University of Oxford, and Hugh Haughton, University of York, will talk about their work on literary letters in relation to life-writing and biographical practice.

St Cross Talk: ‘Social Media and the New Language of Politics’ @ St Cross College
Nov 21 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
St Cross Talk: 'Social Media and the New Language of Politics' @ St Cross College | England | United Kingdom

‘Social Media and the New Language of Politics’

Professor Massimiliano Demata, St Cross alumnus, DPhil English Language & Literature, 1994

Digital communication has revolutionised politics. The importance of political information and propaganda spread on new media has outgrown that of traditional media. The elections of Barack Obama (called by many “the Facebook President”) and Donald Trump (“the Twitter President”) are seen as evidence of the influence played by social media in mobilising the electorate. If the media have changed (and are continually changing), so verbal and visual modes of expression within political communication. Elaborating on the analytical perspectives of Critical Discourse Analysis (including Critical Multimodal Discourse Analysis), Prof. Demata will discuss some of the linguistic and non-linguistic strategies employed by American politicians in the new media environment.

Massimiliano Demata is Assistant Professor of English Language and Translation at the University of Bari, Italy. He took his DPhil in English at St Cross College, Oxford in 1999 and was a Fulbright Research Scholar at Yale University (1999) and Indiana University (2014). In 2008 he published his monograph, Representations of War and Terrorism. The Ideology and Language of George W. Bush. He has published extensively on the language of British and American media and politics, Computer-mediated communication and translation and ideology. His current research focuses on social media and Multimodality in the context of American politics.

Canada Seminar with Janice Charette, Canada’s High Commissioner to the UK, and Howard Drake CMG OBE, former British High Commissioner to Canada @ Lady Margaret Hall
Nov 21 @ 5:45 pm – 7:00 pm
Canada Seminar with Janice Charette, Canada’s High Commissioner to the UK, and Howard Drake CMG OBE, former British High Commissioner to Canada @ Lady Margaret Hall | England | United Kingdom

The next Canada Seminar takes place in the Simpkins Lee Theatre at LMH on Tuesday 21st November 2017, 5.45pm to 7.00pm.

Our special guests in conversation will be Janice Charette, Canada’s High Commissioner to the UK, and Howard Drake CMG OBE, former British High Commissioner to Canada, 2013 to 2017. Further details to be confirmed.

The event is free of charge and guests are welcome. A drinks reception will follow in the Monson Room. Places can be booked online via Eventbrite.

Artificial Intelligence and Impact Investing @ Christ Church College Lecture Room 2
Nov 21 @ 7:45 pm – 9:45 pm
Artificial Intelligence and Impact Investing @ Christ Church College Lecture Room 2 | England | United Kingdom

HOW we fund impact as important as what we fund?

What’s new in INNOVATIVE FINANCING using technology to allow investors to match their risk, return and impact preferences with specific investments and portfolios.

Oxford Impact Investments, together with Oxford Futurists & Oxford Women in Consulting are proud to present our speaker who’s come all the way from Cape Town, South Africa:

Ms. Aunnie Patton Power
Founder, Intelligent Impact
Associate Fellow, Oxford University Bertha Centre for Social Innovation

Intelligent Impact was founded to explore how to harness Artificial Intelligence / Machine Learning to help solve one of the intractable problems in the social impact / impact finance fields: how to access information that is reliable and actionable. Aunnie has advised on Innovative Finance projects including developing a South African Impact Investing National Advisory Board, a Green Investment Bank, Social Impact Bonds / Development Impact Bonds, a Green Outcomes Funds and others.

Venue @Christ Church College Lecture Room 2

Nov
22
Wed
LGBT Lives: Narratives and Representation @ Radcliffe Humanities
Nov 22 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
LGBT Lives: Narratives and Representation @ Radcliffe Humanities | England | United Kingdom

Chair: Professor Philip Bullock (TORCH Director and Professor of Russian Language and Literature, and Music, Oxford)
Speakers: Professor Richard Sandell (Professor of Museum Studies, Leicester University), Rachael Lennon (National Public Programme – Content and Research Manager at the National Trust), and Professor Dan Healey (Professor of Modern Russian History, Oxford)

This event brings together a panel of researchers and heritage professionals who have explored in their work LGBT narratives, identities and representation. The year 2017 is the 50th anniversary of the decriminalisation of homosexuality and the year has been marked with celebrations in various media and formats to raise the profile of the 1967 sexual offences act. At this lunchtime discussion, the panel will talk about the representation and inclusion of LGBTQ+ narratives in museums and spaces, including the National Trust, theories of sexuality and gender, as well as the historical and current treatment of the LGBT community, particularly in modern Russia.

Free and all welcome – booking required.

‘How the F-word is changing news’ – Liz Corbin, editor, BBC Reality Check @ Barclay Room, Green Templeton College
Nov 22 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

Reuters Institute seminars “The business and practice of journalism”
The following seminars will be given at 2pm on Wednesdays, normally in the Barclay Room, Green Templeton College.
Convenors: Meera Selva

Inducement and Smaller-States’ Triple Trade-offs: Southeast Asian Responses to China’s Belt and Road Initiative @ Deakin Room, St Antony's College
Nov 22 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Inducement and Smaller-States' Triple Trade-offs: Southeast Asian Responses to China's Belt and Road Initiative @ Deakin Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Policy is about trade-offs, more so in the realm of external affairs. This is especially true for weaker and smaller states faced with material inducement from big power, as their inherent limitations and vulnerabilities mean that they are more exposed to the mixed effects of power-centred inducement than stronger states. This seminar focuses on Southeast Asian states’ responses to China’s Belt and Road Initiative, using the observable commonalities and variations across the region thus far to illustrate nuances of the “triple trade-offs” – across domains, time and levels – in driving, shaping and limiting weaker states’ reactions to the range of returns and risks surrounding the BRI. The speaker will argue that the trade-offs are weighted primarily along the ruling elites’ respective pathways of legitimation, for the ultimate end of boosting their own authority at home. This presentation is based on the speaker’s ongoing research project (with Lee Jones as Co-Investigator) under the Newton Advanced Fellowship, supported by the British Academy and the Academy of Sciences, Malaysia.

Cheng-Chwee Kuik is Associate Professor at the Strategic Studies and International Relations Program at the National University of Malaysia (UKM) and concurrently an associate member at the Institute of China Studies at the University of Malaya (UM). He is the founder and co-convener of the East Asian International Relations (EAIR) Caucus. Dr. Kuik is an adjunct lecturer at the Malaysian Armed Forces Defense College (under Ministry of Defense) and the Institute of Diplomacy and Foreign Relations (under Ministry of Foreign Affairs). Previously he was a postdoctoral research associate at the Princeton-Harvard “China and the World” Program, and a visiting research fellow at Oxford’s Department of Politics and International Relations. Dr. Kuik’s research concentrates on weaker states’ foreign policy behaviour, regional multilateralism, East Asian security, China-ASEAN relations, and Malaysia’s external policy. His publications have appeared in peer-reviewed journals such as Journal of Contemporary China, Contemporary Southeast Asia, Chinese Journal of International Politics, Asian Security, China: An International Journal, Asian Politics and Policy, East Asian Policy, Shijie Jingji yu Zhengzhi, as well as edited books. Cheng-Chwee’s essay “The Essence of Hedging” was awarded the biennial 2009 Michael Leifer Memorial Prize by the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies for the best article published in any of the three ISEAS journals. He is a co-editor (with Alice Ba and Sueo Sudo) of Institutionalizing East Asia: Mapping and Reconfiguring Regional Cooperation (Routledge 2016). Cheng-Chwee serves on the editorial boards of Contemporary Southeast Asia, Australian Journal of International Affairs, Asian Perspective, and Routledge’s “IR Theory and Practice in Asia” Book Series. He holds an M.Litt. from the University of St. Andrews, and a PhD from the Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies.

The Cost of Energy Review @ Oxford Martin School
Nov 22 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
The Cost of Energy Review @ Oxford Martin School | England | United Kingdom

This is a joint event between the Oxford Martin School, the Oxford Martin Programme on Integrating Renewable Energy and the Oxford Energy Colloquium

Following on from the release of the Independent review to ensure energy is affordable for households and businesses, led by Professor Dieter Helm CBE, we are delighted that Dieter is coming to give a talk on the review.

Professor Dieter Helm, one of Britain’s leading energy experts, will talk about how we can meet the targets in the UK Climate Change Act and ensure security of supply at least cost. He will talk about looking for opportunities to reduce costs in each element of the electricity supply chain and consider the implications of the changing demand for electricity, including the role of innovative technologies such as electric vehicles, storage, robotics and artificial intelligence.

Following the talk there will be a drinks reception, all welcome.

And then the magic happens! Can realist synthesis really be systematic? @ Rewley House
Nov 22 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm
And then the magic happens! Can realist synthesis really be systematic? @ Rewley House | England | United Kingdom

Dr Andrew Booth, Reader in Evidence Based Information Practice at the School for Health & Related Research (ScHARR), University of Sheffield

Rewley House, Wednesday, 22 November 2017, 18:15 – 19:15

Realist synthesis has positioned itself as a potentially valuable tool within health services research and evaluation. Opportunistically, it now inhabits the shadowy borderland between the messy domain of real world evaluation and the perceived rigorous scientific method of systematic review and evidence synthesis. Occupying this methodological demilitarised zone is not without its challenges; offering ongoing friction, perceptible tensions but not, at least to date, incandescent light! In this presentation Dr Booth will explore the extent to which realist synthesis can be seen as a bona fide member of the review family or, alternatively, as a rogue claimant syphoning off time, expertise and resources from the systematic reviews movement. He will explore his own experience on over half-a-dozen funded and unfunded realist syntheses against a backdrop of developments and current controversies within synthesis methods. Underpinning mechanisms will include conflict, rapprochement and, ultimately, reconciliation.

This talk is part of the Realist Reviews and Realist Evaluation module, which is part of the MSc in Evidence-Based Health Care and MSc in EBHC Systematic Reviews.

This is a free event and members of the public are welcome to attend.

Raphaël Millière: Psychedelic science and consciousness @ The Cape of Good Hope, Function room
Nov 22 @ 7:00 pm – 11:00 pm
Raphaël Millière: Psychedelic science and consciousness @ The Cape of Good Hope, Function room | England | United Kingdom

What can psychedelic science tell us about consciousness?

7:00 – 7:30 Welcome
7:30 – 8:30 Talk
8:30 – 11:00 Open discussion and social

Suggested donation £3

For our second speaker event of the term, we are very excited to hear from Oxford local Raphaël Millière. Raphaël is a DPhil candidate in Philosophy, currently collaborating with the Centre for Neuropsychopharmacology of Imperial College London on a study investigating the effects of N,N-DMT.

We will be in the function room at the Cape of Good Hope. Spaces are limited, so please get a ticket and we hope to see you there!
The Oxford Psychedelic Society

Nov
23
Thu
Stress, Strain, and Overwork in Historical Perspectives @ Radcliffe Humanities
Nov 23 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm

In this talk on Stress, Strain, and Overwork in Historical Perspective Professor Sally Shuttleworth (Faculty of English Language and Literature) will look at discussions of stress and overwork in both education and professional life in the Victorian era. Although we are clearly living in a radically altered world, there are nonetheless startling similarities in the ways the problems of overwork have been framed and debated, then and now.

Registration is free. Booking essential.

Click here to register for your free ticket.

Lunch from 12.30pm. Talk from 1pm.

This event is part of UK Disability History Month 22 Nov-22 Dec.

The Element in the Room @ Norrington Room, Blackwells Bookshop
Nov 23 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
The Element in the Room @ Norrington Room, Blackwells Bookshop | England | United Kingdom

Have you ever wanted to perform sonic experiments with your morning coffee? Spice up your love life with inspiration from the animal kingdom? In conversation with Helen Arney and Steve Mould they discuss their rib-tickling, experiment-fuelled book The Element in the Room, a book for anyone sci-curious who wants to explore the science that is staring you right in the face.

Steve Mould and Helen Arney, aka two-thirds of the Festival of the Spoken Nerd, have a combined 35 million YouTube views, their own Radio 4 programme, Domestic Science, appeared in three consecutive slots of the latest series of QI and toured their stand-up science show to over 15,000 people in the UK.

Come along for the lunchtime talk ahead of their evening show at The Cornerstone, Didcot where they will be performing Festival of the Spoken Nerd – You Can’t Polish a Nerd.

Suitable for ages 16+

Responding to emerging epidemics: how can pathogen genomics help? @ Oxford Martin School
Nov 23 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

The management of emerging infectious disease outbreaks is a defining problem of our ever more mobile and connected world. Pathogen genomes contain a remarkable amount of information about disease transmission, and genomic technologies are being used increasingly to investigate new outbreaks. Yet the contribution that genomics can make to infectious disease surveillance is only beginning to be appreciated by public health agencies.

Professor Oliver Pybus, Co-Director of the Oxford Martin Programme on Pandemic Genomics, will outline the opportunities and challenges ahead as we try to integrate genomic data into epidemic control efforts.

Talk: Building a New Future for Food and Farming @ Summertown Library
Nov 23 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Talk: Building a New Future for Food and Farming @ Summertown Library | England | United Kingdom

Topical Talk by scientist, environmentalist and author COLIN TUDGE addressing the need for a radical approach to food and food production. Everyone in the world could be well fed without destroying our fellow creatures if only we farmed properly and re-learned how to cook. But governments and big business have lost the plot.
– So we – all of us – need to take control.

Nov
24
Fri
Surgical Grand Rounds: “How to ask the right questions” @ Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital
Nov 24 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am

As part of the Surgical Grand Rounds lecture series, Professor Wytske Fokkens will discuss “How to ask the right questions.”

Wytske J. Fokkens is Professor at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology at the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam. Her main field of interest is sinus/skullbase surgery and mucosal pathology of the upper and lower airways

The recovery of Murchison Falls @ Environmental Change Institute, Oxford University Centre for the Environment
Nov 24 @ 4:15 pm – 6:30 pm

Michael Keigwin (Uganda Conservation Foundation) & Charles Tumwesigye (Uganda Wildlife Authority) will provide a fascinating and inspirational account of how Uganda’s Murchison Falls National Park has experienced dramatically mixed fortunes, from international adoration to tragedy, and steadily back towards a conservation and development success story, thanks to their efforts.

Michael Keigwin is the Founding Trustee of UCF and a Director of UCU, the Ugandan operational arm of the Charity. He has a close and intimate knowledge of Uganda having spent 9 years living amongst the people whilst running his Elephant, Crops & People project which led to the formation of UCF. Michael has played a key role in enforcing ‘conservation in action’ and as Operative Trustee oversees and directs the project work in Uganda. Having worked in the UK as a Senior Consultant for Deloitte from 2009 Michael returned to live and establish a business in Uganda in November 2011.

Charles Tumwesigye was the proud winner of the 2013 National Geographic Society/Buffet Award for Leadership in African Conservation.

Criminal Justice in America. Speakers: Dr Kathy Boudin & Mr Chesa Boudin @ The Sir Joseph Hotung Auditorium, Hands Building, Mansfield College
Nov 24 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Dr Kathy Boudin, Assistant Professor at the Centre for Justice, Columbia University. Her work focuses on the HIV/AIDS epidemic and criminal justice issues, including women in prison, and basic literacy inside correctional institutions.
Mr Chesa Boudin is a trial lawyer; writer and lecturer specialising in the US criminal justice system and Latin American policy. His scholarly work covers a range of topics such as the rights of children with incarcerated parents, and prison visitation policies.

What is Feminist Poetry? @ East Oxford Community Centre
Nov 24 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
What is Feminist Poetry? @ East Oxford Community Centre | England | United Kingdom

Ever felt like there was something you really wanted to say but you just weren’t sure how? We’re exploring the why and how of women’s speech and writing with the help of some amazing women writers and gender experts.

This is our fabulous launch for a feminist writing course to run in Oxford in early 2018.

The event will include presentations from rising-star feminist writers sharing their work and discussing what it means to express their gender in their writing.

There will be a chance to share your ideas about what feminist poetry means to you, how gender is expressed through poetry and language, what it means to write as your gender, and some of the challenges of writing women’s experiences, platforming a variety of voices in conversation.

We also invite presentations from YOU of your own work and/or that of your feminist heroes.

Kids and people of all genders welcome.

East Oxford Community Centre
Doors open 7.30pm (the bar will be open)

Nov
25
Sat
Fabian Society regional conference, Oxford @ Quaker Meeting House
Nov 25 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Fabian Society regional conference, Oxford @ Quaker Meeting House | England | United Kingdom

The Oxford Fabian Society host the Fabian Society regional conference.

Embracing Change: Socialism for a Brave New World

Outline programme

9:00-9:30: registration

9:30: Welcome: Oxford and the Fabian Society. Michael Weatherburn (Secretary, Oxford Fabians)

9:45-10:15: Opening plenary. Kate Green MP (Chair, Fabian Society) and Andrew Harrop (General Secretary, Fabian Society)

10:15-11:15: Panel 1, Taking Our Place: workers affecting workplace change. Annaliese Dodds MP (Oxford East), Melanie Simms (Leicester University), & Caroline Raine (Area Organiser, UNISON). Facilitator: David Yates (Vice-Chair, Oxford Fabians)

11:45-12:45: Panel 2, New Channels of Influence. Shaista Aziz (journalist, writer), Ann Black (Labour NEC), Richard Fletcher (Reuters Institute, Oxford University), Dan Iley-Williamson (Labour city councillor, Holywell & Oxford Momentum). Facilitator: Nick Fahy (Oxford Fabians).

12:45-13:30: Lunch (not provided)

13:30-14:30: Panel 3, The Defence of the Realm. Alex Donnelly (Changing Character of War Programme, Oxford University), Sophy Gardner (RAF, Exeter University), Michael Pryce (Centre for Defence Acquisition, Cranfield University), Chris Williams (Open University). Facilitator: Rosemary Preston (Oxford Fabians).

14:45-15:45: Discussion, Does Socialism Need Patriotism? Facilitated by the Young Fabians.

15:45-16:45: Panel 4, The Local Elections, May 2018. Shaista Aziz (2018 Labour candidate, Rose Hill), Steven Curran (Labour councillor, Iffley Fields), Alex Donnelly (Labour candidate, Hinksey Park 2018), Bob Price (Labour councillor, Hinksey Park), Martyn Rush (Labour candidate, Barton and Sandhills 2018), Christine Simm (Labour councillor, Cowley and Deputy Lord Mayor). Facilitator: Elsa Dawson (Oxford Fabians).

16:45-17:00: Closing remarks, Oxford: Local Politics, Big Picture, 1980-2050. Bob Price (Leader of Oxford City Council, Leader of the Labour Group, and Labour Councillor, Hinksey Park).

WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND THE GLASS CEILING @ The Jam Factory
Nov 25 @ 10:30 am – 2:00 pm
WOMEN IN SCIENCE AND THE GLASS CEILING @ The Jam Factory | England | United Kingdom

The Oxford constituency of the Spanish Researchers in the United Kingdom (SRUK) is holding a discussion panel entitled “Women in science and the glass ceiling” where three invited speakers will give a short talk about the topic, followed by a discussion where the attendees can actively participate.

The invited experts will highlight how the world of science needs to become accessible for everyone, women and girls. The discussion will cover the earlier stages of education, where children become interested in science, to the later stages of the scientific career, where excellent science and innovation require the talents of both women and men. We will evaluate why women’s progress in research is slow and why there are too few female scientists occupying top positions in scientific decision-making, limiting the important potential of highly skilled human capital.

The event will take place on the 18th of November at the The Jam Factory (Hollybush Row, Oxford, OX1 1HU) and it will start at 10:30AM.

This is a free event and open to the public, but registration is needed via Eventbrite.

Nov
27
Mon
“Vulnerability as a methodological and epistemological intervention: What might it mean to write vulnerably?” by Dr Tiffany Page (University of Cambridge) @ Oxford Brookes University, Gibbs Building, Room G217
Nov 27 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Abstract:
In this talk Tiffany Page will consider what vulnerability is and what it does, and its role within the research process. As part of this she will raise the idea of ‘vulnerable writing’, and consider its possibility within feminist methodological approaches to research. The term vulnerable writing describes the process of explicating and recognising vulnerability in writing. This comes from a core concern in thinking about feminist methodologies and approaches to tensions in research, especially in transnational contexts, in addressing how we might respond to others in ways that allow for the acknowledgement of vulnerability in being faced by events which exceed knowledge, and how we can remain open to alternatives through enabling the space and time to question assumptions and forms of certitude, to return to materials, and to change our minds.

Tiffany Page is a Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. Tiffany’s research is interdisciplinary and include the areas and intersections of vulnerability, gender inequalities and institutional violence. In particular she examines vulnerability as a political, methodological and ethical concept as a means to consider embodied responses to local and global social issues. In relation to gender inequalities in higher education, Tiffany’s research examines practices, cultures and leadership that produce particular institutional responses to staff sexual misconduct and help to sustain conditions in which forms of gender based and sexual violence occur.

N.B. The time of this event is not yet confirmed.

Autumn Plant Sciences Lectures – Dr Cicely Marshall, Department of Plant Sciences, University of Oxford Bioquality hotspots in tropical Africa @ Daubeny Lecture Theatre
Nov 27 @ 12:00 am – 12:00 am

Abstract: Bioquality hotspots hold some of the world’s rarest species. These hotspots can be discovered through field work or herbarium collections, and I will introduce our work using both methods in tropical Africa and elsewhere. Identifying hotspots for globally rare plants is important because it concentrates research and conservation effort on them in situ. The process also helps to locate and predict the occurrence of globally rare species, which may be targeted for ex situ protection such as seed banking or cultivation. I will introduce the work we have being doing both in situ and ex situ, with OBGA, including our ongoing collaboration in Japan.

N.B. The time of this event is not yet confirmed.

‘Vulnerability as a methodological and epistemological intervention: What might it mean to write vulnerably?’ by Dr Tiffany Page (University of Cambridge) @ Oxford Brookes University, Gibbs Building, room 217
Nov 27 @ 4:15 pm – 5:30 pm

Abstract:
In this talk Tiffany Page will consider what vulnerability is and what it does, and its role within the research process. As part of this she will raise the idea of ‘vulnerable writing’, and consider its possibility within feminist methodological approaches to research. The term vulnerable writing describes the process of explicating and recognising vulnerability in writing. This comes from a core concern in thinking about feminist methodologies and approaches to tensions in research, especially in transnational contexts, in addressing how we might respond to others in ways that allow for the acknowledgement of vulnerability in being faced by events which exceed knowledge, and how we can remain open to alternatives through enabling the space and time to question assumptions and forms of certitude, to return to materials, and to change our minds.

Tiffany Page is Lecturer in the Department of Sociology at the University of Cambridge. Her research is interdisciplinary and includes the areas and intersections of vulnerability, gender inequalities and institutional violence. In particular she examines vulnerability as a political, methodological and ethical concept as a means to consider embodied responses to local and global social issues. In relation to gender inequalities in higher education, Tiffany’s research examines practices, cultures and leadership that produce particular institutional responses to staff sexual misconduct and help to sustain conditions in which forms of gender based and sexual violence occur.

How we change behaviour and what to do to support it: lessons from randomised trials and other research @ Department for Continuing Education, Rewley House
Nov 27 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
How we change behaviour and what to do to support it: lessons from randomised trials and other research @ Department for Continuing Education, Rewley House | England | United Kingdom

In our society, we tend to view motivation, the state of ‘wanting it’ as a prime mover of behaviour. However, research calls this into question both directly and by showing that, even among people with lukewarm motivation, we can enable behaviour change. Using randomised data mainly from randomised trials and other research, we will examine what these forces are and show how they can be harnessed to change behaviour, even when people have seemingly strong preferences.

Professor Paul Aveyard is a Professor of Behavioural Medicine with the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences at the University of Oxford.

This talk is being held as part of the Introduction to Study Design and Research Methods module which is part of the MSc in Evidence-Based Health Care. This is a free event and members of the public are welcome to attend.