Jan
18
Thu
Lincoln Leads Seminar 1: How do Numbers Shape our Lives? @ Lincoln College
Jan 18 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Lincoln Leads Seminar 1: How do Numbers Shape our Lives? @ Lincoln College | England | United Kingdom

Welcome to the Lincoln Leads Seminar Series 2018.

The first seminar in the series explores the question:
How do Numbers Shape our Lives?

Tickets are free, but must be booked in advance. All welcome.

Panel:
Prof. Dominic Vella (Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford)
Prof. Alistair Fitt (Vice Chancellor, Oxford Brookes)
Silvia Butti (MSc. Mathematics & Foundations of Computer Science)

When: Thursday, 18th January, 5.45 – 7pm. Wine Reception from 5pm
Where: Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College, Turl St, Oxford
Chair: Francesca Donnellan (DPhil in Clinical Medicine)
Organiser: Paul Stephens, MCR Academic Representative ( [email protected] )

——————————————————————————————

The Lincoln Leads Seminar Series 2018 takes place on Thursday evenings during Hilary term at Lincoln College, Oxford. Each panel features an Alumnus/na, a Fellow, and a Student of the College, who will respond to a topical question linked to their research or professional experience. Following a wine reception at 5pm, each seminar will start at 5.45pm, culminating in a lively Q&A session. We have a fantastic group of panellists scheduled for the series, who aim to invite non-specialist audiences into their spheres of expertise. We therefore hope that you are eager to join them in conversation, and learn more about the exciting and diverse research connected to Lincoln.

Please see below for further details of our speakers:

Dominic Vella is a Professor of Applied Mathematics at the Mathematics Institute here in Oxford and a tutorial fellow at Lincoln. He previously studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, before conducting post-doctoral research in Paris and Cambridge. His research interests include solid and fluid dynamics, with a particular focus in the wrinkling of thin elastic objects and surface tension effects. His work has used mathematics to understand a diverse range of scenarios including, but not limited to; developing structures in biological soft tissue; ice berg and ice floe collisions; brain oedema; geological storage of carbon dioxide; and isotype analysis of animal teeth in archaeology.

Professor Alistair Fitt is the current Vice-Chancellor of Oxford Brookes University. He came to Oxford Brookes after 22 years at the University of Southampton, where he held the post of Pro Vice-Chancellor, International, and Head of the School of Mathematics. His work in industrial applied mathematics has two main areas of interest: modelling the flow of glass, food and other complex fluids; and flow and deformation in human eyes. He has published over 90 academic papers and three books including a guide to Online Share Investing in the UK. Alongside being Director of a number of companies, he is the President of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, and the Chair of the UUK Health Education & Research Policy Network.

Silvia Butti earned her BSc in Pure Mathematics at University College London, and is now an MSc student in Mathematics and Foundations of Computer Science at the Oxford Mathematical Institute. Her research interests span anything to do with metamathematics, from Logic to Computability Theory and Formal Systems. She is also broadly interested in human and machine intelligence, language and cognition.

The tea lady and the till lady @ Saïd Business School
Jan 18 @ 5:45 pm – 6:45 pm

At a time of decreasing trust in institutions, business leaders have a responsibility not only to their company but also to society more widely. Successful leadership depends on fostering an organisation’s people and culture as well as on taking decisions that stack up for society in the long term.

Mark Wilson, Group Chief Executive Officer of Aviva, will reflect on what he calls being a ‘good ancestor’ and how it has informed his leadership throughout his career. From successfully navigating the Asian insurance giant AIA through the global financial crisis to leading the turnaround at Aviva to position it as a 300 year old disputer, he will discuss how business must focus on being a force for good in the world.

The event is open to all and will take place at Saïd Business School followed by a short networking drinks reception until around 7.30pm.

What makes chemistry so boring? @ The Mitre (upstairs function room)
Jan 18 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
What makes chemistry so boring? @ The Mitre (upstairs function room) | England | United Kingdom

What makes chemistry so boring?

Talk followed by questions and discussion.

All wecome

This is one of a series of weekly talks organized by the Oxford Communist Corresponding Society. These talks are held every Thursday from 7:30pm to 9:00pm in the Mitre (upstairs function room), which is on the junction of High St and Turl St. The full list is:

Thursday 18 January
What makes chemistry so boring?

Thursday 25 January
Bitcoin: tulips from cyberspace

Thursday 1 February
The golden hammer: Druidism and its class background

Thursday 8 February
Marxism and gender identity

Thursday 15 February
The gates of mercy in arbitrary space: the National Health state

Thursday 22 February
The dream of human life: art in the Italian Renaissance

Thursday 1 March
The political economy of neural networks

Thursday 8 March
Karl Kautsky (1854–1938) and the road to power

Jan
19
Fri
Surgical Grand Rounds: ‘Safe surgery in Africa: Exploring barriers and trialling interventions’ @ Lecture Theatre 1
Jan 19 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am
Surgical Grand Rounds: 'Safe surgery in Africa: Exploring barriers and trialling interventions' @ Lecture Theatre 1 | Headington | England | United Kingdom

As part of the Surgical Grand Rounds lecture Series, Professor Peter McCulloch and Dr Tinashe Chandauka from the Quality, Reliability, Safety and Teamwork Unit at the Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences will discuss ‘Safe surgery in Africa: Exploring barriers and trialling interventions’.

‘Journalistic ethics in practice: The bright side, dark side and taboos’ – Atte Jääskeläinen, Visiting fellow at RISJ and former Director of News and Current Affairs in Finnish Broadcasting Company Yle @ Butler Room
Jan 19 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Reuters Institute / Nuffield College Media & Politics seminars
The following seminars will be given at 5pm on Fridays, normally in the Butler Room, Nuffield College.
Convenors: Meera Selva, David Levy, Andrew Dilnot

Atte Jääskeläinen, Visiting fellow at RISJ and former Director of News and Current Affairs in Finnish Broadcasting Company Yle
19 Jan: ‘Journalistic ethics in practice: The bright side, dark side and taboos’

Layla Moran MP @ LMH @ Simpkins Lee Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall
Jan 19 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Layla Moran MP @ LMH @ Simpkins Lee Theatre, Lady Margaret Hall | England | United Kingdom

LMH Politics Society is delighted to host Layla Moran MP in the Simpkins Lee on Friday 19 January. Elected in June 2017 with a majority of just 816 votes, she is the Liberal Democrat Spokesperson for Education, and the first UK Member of Parliament of Palestinian descent. She will be speaking about her experiences as a new Member of Parliament, Education, Brexit, Electoral Reform and more. All Oxford students are welcome. Free drinks and snacks will be served before and afterwards!

Immigrant Encounters with London’s Underground Sex Industry: A Film Screening of “The Receptionist (2016)” with the Director @ Shulman Auditorium, Queen's College
Jan 19 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Immigrant Encounters with London's Underground Sex Industry: A Film Screening of "The Receptionist (2016)" with the Director @ Shulman Auditorium, Queen's College | England | United Kingdom

To offer Oxford students the warmest welcome back to Hilary Term, we have invited Director Jenny Lu盧謹明, to show her feature film The Receptionist接線員 (2017) (bilingual subtitles).

This bilingual film is the first UK-Taiwanese film collaboration of its kind, and it tells the story of Tina, a literature graduate living in London, who takes up work as a receptionist in an illegal massage parlour. Through Tina’s eyes, viewers are not exposed to the dark underworld of London’s illegal sex industry, but are also shown a rare glimpse into the lives of those caught up in this world, and the harsh realities they face as Asian migrant women struggling to survive in London.

The film features the famous Taiwanese actress Chen Shiang-Chyi陳湘琪 and was nominated for the Golden Horse Awards. Director Jenny Lu wrote the film script based on a real story she witnessed when she was studying video art in London. After the screening, she will share with us the inspirations behind the story and her experiences as a transnational filmmaker in the UK and Taiwan.

This event will be of interest to those of you who work on contemporary Britain, Asian diaspora, Chinese and Taiwanese culture, film studies, gender studies, translation studies, and race and racism. The film is approximately 100 minutes long, and the director will talk for around 10 minutes with the host, followed by audience Q & A and discussions.

Tickets are 5£ and can be bought in advance
More information can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/events/331762997290657/

Jan
20
Sat
When Lesbians Marry Gay Men: Exploring Fake Marriages and Sexuality in China, a Documentary Screening + Director Q&A @ Shulman Auditorium, Queen's College
Jan 20 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
When Lesbians Marry Gay Men: Exploring Fake Marriages and Sexuality in China, a Documentary Screening + Director Q&A @ Shulman Auditorium, Queen's College | England | United Kingdom

Our Marriages: When Lesbians Marry Gay Men 奇缘一生 —Documentary Screening and Talk with Director He Xiaopei and Dr Bao Hongwei

The Oxford Chinese Studies Society welcomes all to an exclusive screening and discussion of “Our Marriage: When Lesbians Marry Gay Men” with Director He Xiaopei and Dr Bao Hongwei.

How do gays and lesbians negotiate their social identities in postsocialist China? Are the so-called “fake marriages 形式婚姻” between them a pragmatic choice made out of social pressure or a queering act of subversion against the traditional institution of marriage? How do these phenomena tie into China’s revolutionary past and connect to Asia’s current wave of gay marriage legalisation and rising pink economy? These are the questions provoked by Dr. He Xiaopei’s documentary Our Marriage.

“The film, Our Marriage, is an exploration of the lives of four lesbians who decided to marry gay men in order to secretly pursue their relationships with their girlfriends and at the same time fulfil their families’ deep-seated desire that they get married. The sense of respect and responsibility that the marriage partners feel towards their parents, and the avoidance of social ridicule and tricky questions about their child’s sexuality, also play a large role in their decision to stage elaborate and glamorous sham ceremonies…In China, as one of the women in the documentary explained, nobody is allowed to be single. Whilst a burgeoning lesbian social scene is becoming more visible in large cities, heteronormative attitudes force people, heterosexual and homosexual alike, into marriages which they would rather avoid. Marriage can provide social acceptance, but it also gives you certain economic benefits such as access to social housing. Whilst homosexuality is not illegal in China there are no plans to introduce same sex marriage. Activists like He have argued against campaigns for same sex marriage suggesting that the institution of marriage itself should be challenged as it supports patriarchal norms and is detrimental to all people, whether they are gay, straight or bisexual.” — Kate Hawkins, Sexuality and Development Programme International Advisory Group

This event will be of interest to those of you who work on Chinese society, queer studies, film studies, as well as gender studies. The documentary is 45 minutes long, followed a brief talk on queer filmmaking and LGBT activism in China by Dr Bao Hongwei from the University of Nottingham, and then both of them will engage in audience Q & A and discussions.

Speaker biography:
Dr He Xiaopei completed a PhD at the University of Westminster in 2006, titled ‘I am AIDS: Living with the Epidemic in China’. She co-founded an NGO called the Pink Space Sexuality Research Centre in Beijing to promote sexual rights and sexual pleasure among people who are oppressed.

Dr Hongwei Bao is Assistant Professor in Media Studies at the University of Nottingham, UK. He holds a PhD in Gender Studies and Cultural Studies from the University of Sydney, Australia. His research primarily focuses on gay identity and queer politics in contemporary China. He is author of Queer Comrades: Gay Identity and Tongzhi Activism in Postsocialist China (Copenhagen: NIAS Press, forthcoming in 2018).

Jan
22
Mon
Oxford Medical CE Marking Forum: Preparation of technical files @ The Botnar research Centre
Jan 22 @ 9:00 am – 10:30 am
Oxford Medical CE Marking Forum: Preparation of technical files @ The Botnar research Centre  | England | United Kingdom

Part of the ongoing seminar series hosted by the Oxford Medical CE Marking Forum.

Our guest speaker, Anne Jury (Medical Technologies Regulatory Affairs and Quality Management Consultant), will be giving a presentation followed by Coffee/Tea and networking.

Join us on our LinkedIn group “Oxford Medical CE Marking Forum”

From Eleanor Roosevelt to Qaddafi: The Rise and Fall of Human Rights at the United Nations @ TBA (central Oxford College) - see the Facebook event for updates
Jan 22 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
From Eleanor Roosevelt to Qaddafi: The Rise and Fall of Human Rights at the United Nations @ TBA (central Oxford College) - see the Facebook event for updates

70 years since the adoption of the Universal Declaration on Human Rights, has the UN Human Rights Council lost its credibility?

The Oxford Israel Forum and The Oxford Forum are delighted to host Hillel Neuer, renowned international lawyer, diplomat, writer, activist and Executive Director of UN Watch, a human rights NGO based in Geneva. This is a rare opportunity to gain an insight into the inner workings of the UN from a leading expert on the UN Human Rights Council.

Hillel Neuer is an acclaimed speaker who has testified before the United Nations and the U.S. Congress. The Tribune de Genève has described Neuer as a human rights activist who is “feared and dreaded” by the world’s dictatorships. The Journal de Montreal wrote that he “makes the U.N. tremble.” Israel’s Ma’ariv newspaper named him in its list of the “Top 100 Most Influential Jewish People in the World.” On September 14, 2016, the City of Chicago adopted a resolution, signed by Mayor Rahm Emanuel, declaring “Hillel Neuer Day,” in recognition of his role “as one of the world’s foremost human rights advocates,” and for his contributions to “promote peace, justice and human rights around the world.”

This talk will be followed by a Q&A and is free to attend, simply click ‘going’ on the Facebook event to register.

The Spider’s Web: Britain’s 2nd Empire – A Documentary Film about Tax Havens @ Lounge Room, East Oxford Community Centre
Jan 22 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm
The Spider's Web: Britain's 2nd Empire - A Documentary Film about Tax Havens @ Lounge Room, East Oxford Community Centre | England | United Kingdom

Positive Money Oxford, the local branch of a nationwide campaign for the democratisation of the monetary system, is delighted to present a public screening of The Spider’s Web, Michael Oswald’s documentary film on Britain’s role in creating the global network of tax havens.

Mr Oswald will be introducing the film in person, and Co-Producer and celebrated tax justice campaigner John Christensen will also be in attendance to discuss the themes of the film and his involvement in the Tax Justice Network.

The Film

At the demise of empire, City of London financial interests created a web of offshore secrecy jurisdictions that captured wealth from across the globe and hid it behind obscure financial structures in a web of offshore islands. Today, up to half of global offshore wealth may be hidden in British offshore jurisdictions which are amongst the largest global players in the world of international finance. How did this 2nd empire come about, and what impact does it have on the world today? This is what The Spider’s Web sets out to investigate.

Michael Oswald and John Christensen

Michael Oswald is an independent documentary filmmaker based in London UK. He uses narrative storytelling to produce investigative and observational films. He aims to discover, understand and communicate ideas that are given less attention than they deserve. Previous films include 97% Owned: How is Money Created and Princes of the Yen: Central Banks and the Transformation of the Economy.

Trained as a forensic auditor and economist, John Christensen has worked in many countries around the world, including a period of working in offshore financial services with Touche Ross & Co. For 11 years he was economic adviser to the government of the British Channel Island of Jersey. In 2003 he founded the Tax Justice Network where he performed the role of Chief Executive until 2016. He has been described by the Guardian as “the unlikely figurehead of a worldwide campaign against tax avoidance.” His research on offshore finance has been widely published in books and academic journals, and he has has taken part in many films, television documentaries and radio programmes.

The Screening

The film will be screened in the Lounge Room of the East Oxford Community Centre on Monday 22 January 2018. Doors open at 7:30pm with the screening commencing at approximately 7:45 – 8, followed by a Q&A session with Mr Oswald and Mr Christensen.

A Bar serving alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages will be open from 7.30 – 10pm.

Under 18s are welcome if accompanied by an adult.

Advance tickets are priced at a modest £3.50 and are available through wegottickets (http://www.wegottickets.com/event/425615). Entry will be £5 on the door however there are only 50 seats available and as the event may sell out in advance we’d encourage you to book a ticket to avoid disappointment.

Please join us for what promises to be an enjoyable and thought-provoking exploration of a subject at the heart of the economic and political zeitgeist.

https://www.facebook.com/events/145169166141162

Oxfordshire on the Home Front 1914-1918 talk by Stephen Barker @ Exeter Hall,
Jan 22 @ 8:00 pm – 9:15 pm
Oxfordshire on the Home Front 1914-1918 talk by Stephen Barker @ Exeter Hall,  | England | United Kingdom

Talk by Stephen Barker, an independent Heritage Advisor. Oxfordshire on the Home Front will explain about the impact of the war in the towns and countryside. It will focus upon fundraising, charitable events, munitions production, recruitment and the effects on women and children.The talk is fully illustrated and uses testimony from those who were there. Hall is open for tea/coffee from 7.15p.m. with books & Cd’s to browse, and chat to other members.

Kit Kowol, Christ Church and St John’s College, Oxford ‘Grieving for England: mourning and conservatism in Britain after 1945’ @ St John’s College Research Centre
Jan 22 @ 8:15 pm – 9:45 pm

Interdisciplinary Seminars in Psychoanalysis

Jan
23
Tue
The Rohingya Exodus: Orchestrated Violence and Strategies of Survival @ Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum
Jan 23 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
The Rohingya Exodus: Orchestrated Violence and Strategies of Survival @ Headley Lecture Theatre, Ashmolean Museum | England | United Kingdom

The Rohingyas violently expelled by Myanmar are not recognized as international refugees by Bangladesh. Despite lacking citizenship and the right to work, they have sought to survive through covert employment in labour markets and clientelist relations that provide protection for a price. The Rohingya experience raises wider issues about systematic population displacements in the 21st century driven by genocidal campaigns of ethnic and religious persecution and legitimated by contested notions of the ‘imagined community’ and national security.

Jan
24
Wed
‘Not-for-profit journalism – a new model’ – Rachel Oldroyd, managing editor, Bureau of Investigative Journalism @ EP Abraham Lecture Theatre
Jan 24 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Reuters Institute seminars “The business and practice of journalism”
The following seminars will be given at 2pm on Wednesdays, normally in the E.P. Abraham Lecture Theatre, Green Templeton College.
Convenor: Meera Selva

Rachel Oldroyd, managing editor, Bureau of Investigative Journalism
24 Jan: ‘Not-for-profit journalism – a new model’

9 Days in Cairo: Documentary Film Screening and Discussion @ Investcorp Auditorium, St Antony's College
Jan 24 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

January 25th is the anniversary of Giulio Regeni’s disappearance in the streets of Cairo. Giulio was an Italian PhD student at Cambridge. Already two years have passed without Giulio and still no significant progress was made in the search for the truth.

This documentary film “9 days in Cairo” explores Giulio’s story.

After the screening, a panel of key human rights activists and leading social movement academics will discuss with the audience the case and the questions about transnational rights activism in a world of globalised governance.

Film-makers Carlo Bonini and Giuliano Foschini, reporters from La Repubblica, will also join us in the discussion following the film.

Weinrebe Lecture ‘Writing Women: the fourth generation’ @ Wolfson College
Jan 24 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

Novelist Kamila Shamsie considers what it means to be part of the fourth generation of women writers in a family, and how family history might work its way into fictional representations of women across continents and centuries, despite the paucity of autobiographical content in her novels.

Outer reaches: A sculptural journey across continents from the Hebrides to Japan @ Saïd Business School
Jan 24 @ 5:45 pm – 6:45 pm
Outer reaches: A sculptural journey across continents from the Hebrides to Japan @ Saïd Business School | England | United Kingdom

Julie Brook will talk about her land based sculptural work in wild and remote landscapes in Scotland and Africa and give some insight in to her current projects in the Hebrides and Japan.

She responds directly to the specific nature of her environments expressing those influences through the sculptural work and large scale drawings she makes from the materials she finds. She is primarily concerned with how the forms are influenced by the more temporal elements such as light and shadow; climate and tidal changes.

Julie Brook is a British artist who has roamed, lived and sculpted in a succession of uninhabited and remote landscapes in North West Scotland: Hoy, Orkney; Jura, West coast; Mingulay, Outer Hebrides. She has also explored the black volcanic desert of central Libya and Jebel Acacus mountains.

Damage-Tolerance in Engineering and Biological Materials @ Thom Building (Dept of Engineering) (side entrance upstairs - signage will be in place)
Jan 24 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

A free lecture by Robert O. Ritchie of Lawrence Berkeley (USA). Free pre-lecture drinks and nibbles and free post-lecture buffet and drinks (please email [email protected] to reserve a place). Abstract:
The ability of a material to undergo limited deformation is a critical aspect of conferring toughness as this feature enables the local dissipation of high stresses which would otherwise cause fracture. The mechanisms of such deformation can be widely diverse. Although plasticity from dislocation motion in crystalline materials is most documented, inelastic deformation can also occur via in situ phase transformations in certain metals and ceramics, sliding of mineralized collagen fibrils in tooth dentin and bone, rotation of such fibrils in skin, frictional motion between mineral “platelets” in seashells, and even by mechanisms that also lead to fracture such as shear banding in glasses and microcracking in geological materials and bone. Resistance to fracture (toughness) is thus a compromise – a combination of two, often mutually exclusive, properties of strength and deformability. It can also be considered as a mutual competition between intrinsic damage processes that operate ahead of the tip of a crack to promote its advance and extrinsic crack-tip shielding mechanisms that act mostly behind the crack tip to locally diminish crack-tip stresses and strains. Here we examine the interplay between strength and ductility and between intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms in developing toughness in a range of biological and natural materials, including bone, skin and fish scales, and in certain advanced metallic alloys, including bulk-metallic glasses and high-entropy alloys.

Jan
25
Thu
“AI in healthcare” with Prof David Clifton @ Oxford Martin School
Jan 25 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

It seems like everywhere we look computers are running more and more of the world around us. In healthcare, we have seen an astounding level of hype surrounding the use of artificial intelligence in image recognition, personalised treatment, form filling in and diagnostic technologies. What are the potential applications for AI in health and life sciences, but also the barriers to its adoption and practical implementation?

Further information and registration: https://www.oxfordmartin.ox.ac.uk/event/2521

Lincoln Leads Seminar 2: Should there be Limits on Free Speech? @ Lincoln College
Jan 25 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Lincoln Leads Seminar 2: Should there be Limits on Free Speech? @ Lincoln College | England | United Kingdom

Welcome to the Lincoln Leads Seminar Series 2018.

The second seminar in the series explores the question:
Should there be Limits on Free Speech?

Tickets are free, but must be booked in advance. All welcome.

Panel:
Dr. Alexander Prescott-Couch (Fellow of Lincoln College, Oxford)
Ian Brownhill (Barrister, No5 Chambers)
Benjamin Musachio (MPhil. Modern Languages)

When: Thursday, 25th January, 5.45 – 7pm. Wine Reception from 5pm
Where: Oakeshott Room, Lincoln College, Turl St, Oxford
Chair: Lauren Malm (MSt in English (1700-1830))
Organiser: Paul Stephens, MCR Academic Representative
( [email protected] )

——————————————————————————————

The Lincoln Leads Seminar Series 2018 takes place on Thursday evenings during Hilary term at Lincoln College, Oxford. Each panel features an Alumnus/na, a Fellow, and a Student of the College, who will respond to a topical question linked to their research or professional experience. Following a wine reception at 5pm, each seminar will start at 5.45pm, culminating in a lively Q&A session. We have a fantastic group of panellists scheduled for the series, who aim to invite non-specialist audiences into their spheres of expertise. We therefore hope that you are eager to join them in conversation, and learn more about the exciting and diverse research connected to Lincoln.

Please see below for further details of our speakers:

Dr. Alexander Prescott-Couch is a Tutorial Fellow in Philosophy at Lincoln College, Oxford, and is an Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy. He graduated with a BA in Philosophy and History from Columbia University, and completed a PhD in Philosophy from Harvard University, where he was the 2013-2014 winner of the Bowen Prize for Best Paper in Moral Philosophy. His research focuses on the philosophy of social science and political philosophy. He also has a strong interest in German philosophy, particularly Nietzsche. His paper “Explanation and Manipulation” was recently published in the September 2017 edition of ‘Noûs’.

Ian Brownhill is an experienced criminal defence practitioner who has practiced in all levels of Courts. He graduated with a BA in Jurisprudence from Lincoln College, Oxford, and earned a BVC from the College of Law. As a confident jury advocate with a busy public law practice, Ian defends protestors prosecuted for activities related to their freedom of assembly and expression, and provides criminal defence for professionals and high net worth individuals, as well as dealing with ancillary orders made by criminal courts and criminal work in High Court and Court of Appeal. Nominated for the Legal Aid Barrister of the year 2015, Ian continues to handle cases for both private and insurer funded clients as well as legally aided criminal defence work.

Benjamin Musachio is a M.Phil student in Modern Languages and Literatures, with a focus on Russian literature. He graduated Stanford University in 2017 with a B.A. degree in Slavic Languages & Literatures and Philosophy. His current research interests include the Anglo-American reception of Soviet literature and the history of Russian literary culture in Latvia. Previously, he examined American conservatives’ divergent interpretations of Boris Pasternak’s novel, ‘Doctor Zhivago’. He looks forward to beginning his PhD studies in Slavics at Princeton University in 2019.

SCREENING + Q&A: ‘Revolution – New Art for a New World’ w/ Margy Kinmonth @ West Wing Lecture Theatre, St Cross College
Jan 25 @ 5:00 pm – 7:15 pm

On 25 January, we are delighted to be joined by BAFTA award-winning filmmaker Margy Kinmonth who will be presenting her latest film, ‘Revolution – New Art for a New World’ at St Cross College, followed by a Q&A.

ABOUT THE FILM –

Drawing on the collections of major Russian institutions, contributions from contemporary artists, curators, and performers and personal testimony from the descendants of those involved, the film brings the artists of the Russian Avant-Garde to life. It tells the stories of artists like Chagall, Kandinsky, Malevich and others – pioneers who flourished in response to the Utopian challenge of building a New Art for a New World, only to be broken by implacable authority after 15 short years.

Stalin’s rise to power marked the close of this momentous period, consigning the Avant Garde to obscurity. Yet the Russian Avant-Garde continues to exert a lasting influence over art movements up to the present day. Revolution – New Art for a New World confirms this, exploring the fascination that these colourful paintings, inventive sculptures and propaganda posters retain over the modern consciousness 100 years on.

Revolution – New Art for a New World was filmed entirely on location in Moscow, St. Petersburg and London, with access to The State Tretyakov Gallery, The State Russian Museum, The State Hermitage Museum and in co-operation with The Royal Academy of Arts, London. The film features paintings previously banned and unseen for decades, and masterpieces, which rarely leave Russia. Contributors include Museum Directors Professor Mikhail Piotrovsky and Zelfira Tregulova and film director Andrei Konchalovsky. The film also features Matthew Macfadyen, Tom Hollander, James Fleet, Eleanor Tomlinson and Daisy Bevan.

It was filmed entirely on location in Moscow, St. Petersburg and London, with access to The State Tretyakov Gallery, The State Russian Museum, The State Hermitage Museum and in co-operation with The Royal Academy of Arts, London. The film features paintings previously banned and unseen for decades, and masterpieces, which rarely leave Russia.

ABOUT MARGY KINMONTH –

Margy Kinmonth is a BAFTA award winning film and television director whose many credits include theatrical features ‘Revolution – New Art for a New World’ (Foxtrot Films/Arts Alliance), marking the 1917 Russian Revolution, ‘Hermitage Revealed’, and ‘Royal Paintbox’ (Moscow Film Festival) with HRH The Prince of Wales.

Kinmonth’s series ‘Naked Hollywood’ (BBC) won BAFTA Best Documentary Series. ‘The Strange World of Barry Who?’ (BBC) about Francis Bacon, won RTS Best Arts Film Award. ‘WAR ART with Eddie Redmayne’ (Foxtrot/ITV) was nominated for BAFTA, RTS and Peabody Awards.

Kinmonth’s credits include ‘Looking for Lowry’ (Foxtrot/ITV) with Ian McKellen, ‘The Secret World of Haute Couture’ (BBC), ‘Mariinsky Theatre, Nutcracker Story’ (Foxtrot/ITV), ‘Outback Art’, ‘Dawn French’, ‘Smoking Diaries about Simon Gray’, ‘Gormley’s Brick Man’, ‘Remember the Secret Policeman’s Ball’. Drama includes ‘To The Western World’ (London Film Festival), ‘Baker’s Dozen’, ‘Casualty’, ‘Eastenders’.

In 2009, Kinmonth won Creative Originality Award from Women in Film & Television and, in 2017, was awarded the Likhachev Fellowship.

For more information, please visit www.foxtrotfilms.com

Funding innovation and innovative funding: Addressing the pioneer gap in fragile places @ Saïd Business School
Jan 25 @ 5:45 pm – 6:45 pm
Funding innovation and innovative funding: Addressing the pioneer gap in fragile places @ Saïd Business School | England | United Kingdom

Alix Zwane, CEO of the Global Innovation Fund, will discuss how alleviating poverty and reducing fragility requires a pro-development, market-based approach to gather in new ideas and additional financial flows. In her view, patient and long-term investment capital is a critical component for breaking the extreme poverty cycle.

Jan
26
Fri
Creating Economic Space for Social Innovation @ Said Business School - Lecture theatre VI
Jan 26 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
Creating Economic Space for Social Innovation @ Said Business School - Lecture theatre VI | England | United Kingdom

Creating Economic Space for Social Innovation – final conference

Time: 09:00, 26 Jan 2018 Add to Calendar
Location:
Lecture Theatre VI
Address:
Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, Park End Street, Oxford, OX1 1HP
Speakers/Lecturers:
Speakers will cover a range of social innovation issues, including impact measurement, finance, social policy, theory-building.
Admission: Registration required Book now
For any enquiries:
Email organiser
Sponsor:
European Commission, FP 7
The event will bring together academics, practitioners and policymakers from a wide range of disciplines to focus on how interventions drawing on social innovation can address major economic, social and power imbalances and inequalities.

Speakers will cover a range of social innovation issues, including impact measurement, finance, social policy, theory-building, all with a focus on enhancing the lives of the most marginalised and disempowered citizens through social innovation.

The event will also include a keynote by economic sociologist Jens Beckert (Director of the Max Plank Institute for the Studies of Society – MPIfG), whose work has provided one of the main inspirations of the CrESSI-project -, Frank Moulaert (Professor of Spatial Planning, Head of the Planning and Development Unit ASRO, Faculty of Engineering, KU Leuven, Belgium) and Jürgen Howaldt (Director Sozialforschungsstelle Dortmund Central scientific unit – University of Dortmund).

The Economic Benefits of a Neural Circuit Motif – Simon Laughlin, University of Cambridge @ Oxford Martin School
Jan 26 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
‘Trust, power and the crisis of media’ – Ed Williams, chief executive officer, Edelman UK and Ireland @ Butler Room
Jan 26 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Reuters Institute / Nuffield College Media & Politics seminars
The following seminars will be given at 5pm on Fridays, normally in the Butler Room, Nuffield College.
Convenors: Meera Selva, David Levy, Andrew Dilnot

Ed Williams, chief executive officer, Edelman UK and Ireland
26 Jan: ‘Trust, power and the crisis of media’

Humans as a Service: the Promise and Perils of Work in the Gig Economy – Jeremias Prassl @ Sir Joseph Hotung Auditorium, Hands Building, Mansfield College
Jan 26 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
International Influences on Domestic Policy-Making in China: The 2018 Chun-tu Hsueh Distinguished Lecture @ Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College
Jan 26 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm
International Influences on Domestic Policy-Making in China: The 2018 Chun-tu Hsueh Distinguished Lecture @ Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

This lecture examines 21st-century social policies and what they tell us about Chinese politics. At the same time it makes the case for more rigorous qualitative policy research, and it argues that international influences show it is time to reconceptualise Chinese policy processes.

Jan
27
Sat
De Profundis. A celebration of Oscar Wilde with Simon Callow and Jonathan Aitken @ Simpkins Lee Theatre, LMH
Jan 27 @ 2:00 pm – 7:00 pm

2pm Wilde’s last years: Dr Sos Eltis, Brasenose College
2.45 The Ballad of Reading Gaol – read by five LMH students
3.15 Break
3.30 Jonathan Aitken in conversation with Alan Rusbridger – Why did the rehabilitation of Oscar Wilde fail in the 1890s? Why does the rehabilitation
of offenders fail today?
4.30 Break
5-6.30 Simon Callow reading De Profundis
Drinks

A Look at the Forest: Universal Characteristics of the Buddhist-Rohingya Conflict @ Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College
Jan 27 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
A Look at the Forest: Universal Characteristics of the Buddhist-Rohingya Conflict @ Nissan Institute Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

The 1997 publication of Zen at War sent shockwaves through Western adherents of Buddhism because it revealed allegedly enlightened Buddhist leaders had been fervent, even fanatical, supporters of Japanese militarism during WW II. Yet, Buddhists not affiliated with either the Zen sect, nor Japanese Buddhism, could take comfort in regarding this support as a “Zen thing” or “Japanese thing”, or even a “Mahāyāna thing”. In following years, however, it became clear that the Sri Lankan army enjoyed the strong support of Singhalese Buddhist leaders during that country’s long civil war with indigenous Tamils. And today, we see a similar, if not more horrendous, scenario playing out between Buddhists and Rohingya in Myanmar. In short, the question of Buddhism and violence can no longer be attributed to one or another sect of Buddhism, or either the Theravāda or Mahāyāna schools. It must now be recognized as the pan-Buddhist phenomenon it is. So, what’s going on?

This lecture will address the question though not in the manner many might expect. Namely, it will not focus on Buddhism’s “violence-enabling mechanisms” (though there are many) but will take a step further back and ask why Buddhism is not essentially any different in its “sacralization” of violence, i.e. fighting “holy wars”, from the world’s other major faiths. Thus, the deeper question this lecture seeks to address is, using Buddhist-related violence as a starting point, why all major religions, at one time or another, have participated in allegedly holy wars. This is the meaning of taking “a look at the forest”, not just the individual trees (examples) of Buddhist violence. You are cordially invited to participate in this “walk through the forest”.

The lecturer, Dr Brian Victoria, is a fellow of the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies and author of Zen at War and many other books and articles concerning Buddhism and violence. At present, he is completing a book on (Zen)Buddhist-related terrorism in 1930s Japan. Brian is a fully-ordained priest in the Sōtō Zen sect of Japanese Buddhism and currently lives and conducts research in Kyoto, Japan.