Apr
29
Sat
Christian Perspectives on Death and Dying @ Oxford Quaker Meeting House
Apr 29 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm

‘Christian Perspectives on Death and Dying’ is an ecumenical initiative aimed at supporting engagement with current debates about death and dying. Join us for a day of conversation, reflection and debate – panels include:
Advance decisions and ‘living wills’ – making end of life decisions for yourself (3.15pm)
Withdrawing medical treatments – making decisions for those who have lost the ability to decide for themselves (11am)
Assisted dying – legal, social and theological perspectives (1.30pm)
The event will be complimented by an art exhibition exploring ethical and legal issues surrounding the care of people in a long-term coma and the experiences of their families. Attendees will have opportunities to ask questions, engage in debate and think about their own faith throughout the day.

Confirmed speakers include
Prof Derick Wade (neurorehab consultant)
Prof Dominic Wilkinson (Director of Medical Ethics & a Consultant Neonatologist)
The Lord Carey of Clifton (former Archbishop of Canterbury),
The Right Reverend Dr Lee Rayfield, (Bishop of Swindon),
Revd Canon Dr Joanna Collicutt (Diocese of Oxford),
Revd Canon Rosie Harper (Diocese of Oxford),
Revd Canon Dr Sarah Rowland Jones (Diocese of Llandaff),
Usha Grieves (from the charity ‘Compassion in Dying’),
Prof Sue Wilkinson (‘Advance Decision Assistance’),
Prof Jenny Kitzinger (Coma & Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre, University of Cardiff), and
Prof Celia Kitzinger (Coma & Disorders of Consciousness Research Centre, University of York).

May
2
Tue
Research Uncovered—A rock and a hard place: creating the Online Corpus of Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia @ Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library
May 2 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Research Uncovered—A rock and a hard place: creating the Online Corpus of Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia @ Centre for Digital Scholarship, Weston Library | England | United Kingdom

The Arabian Peninsula lies at the heart of the Middle East. Today, it is of enormous strategic and commercial importance and this was also the case in antiquity. Yet, most of what we know about its ancient history, languages and cultures comes from contemporaries looking at it from outside, such as the Assyrians, Greeks, and Romans, or from much later reports on what was considered the “Age of Ignorance”.

This talk gives an overview of inscriptions found in North Arabia, and outlines the process of creating the Online Corpus of Inscriptions of Ancient North Arabia (OCIANA) database. It will be of interest to anyone wanting to understand how complex databases are designed. In particular, it focusses on using FileMaker Pro for research databases.

Daniel Burt, the speaker, graduated from the University of Manchester in the early 1990s and went on to work in a variety of technical roles involving data architecture in the private sector and the computer games industry, before joining Cancer Research UK where he developed a prize-winning database managing clinical administration within the Medical Oncology Unit at the Churchill Hospital in Oxford.

Following on from his work for Cancer Research UK, Daniel worked on a number of development contracts for clients including The Department of Health and Oxford University Press, before joining the University of Oxford in 2005. Over the last 12 years he has been involved in creating databases and websites for individual departments and research projects across the Humanities Division, as well as for The Ashmolean Museum, The Museum of Natural History, and the Pitt Rivers Museum. During his time at Oxford, Daniel has worked on projects funded by, amongst others, the Arts and Humanities Research Council, the Leverhulme Trust, the Wellcome Trust, and the National Lottery Heritage Fund, and has taught courses on working with digital images and assets and database development to both undergraduate and postgraduate students.

Access: Please meet at 12.55 by the Information Desk in the Weston Library’s Blackwell Hall to be taken to the Centre for Digital Scholarship. If you have a University or Bodleian Reader’s card, you can also get there through the Mackerras Reading Room on the first floor of the Weston Library, around the gallery, having checked any bags into a locker (£1 returnable deposit) before you head upstairs.

Cypriot Fiddlers film screening @ Wolfson College
May 2 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

The Cypriot Fiddler is an attempt to trace the life stories of a dying class of traditional musicians on both sides of the Cypriot divide. The documentary, released in 2016, was entirely funded by members of the public through an online crowd-sourcing campaign.

Dr Nicoletta Demetriou is Research Fellow in Ethnomusicology and Life Writing, and Tutor in Narrative Non-Fiction on the MSt in Creative Writing. She has a PhD in Ethnomusicology from SOAS, University of London, and an MA in Life Writing from the University of East Anglia. Prior to joining Wolfson (in 2012), Dr Demetriou was the Alistair Horne Visiting Fellow at St. Antony’s College (2011-12).

The Will of the People? The History of Petitioning in Britain and Its Implications for Today @ Wolfson College
May 2 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
The Will of the People? The History of Petitioning in Britain and Its Implications for Today @ Wolfson College | England | United Kingdom

Is there, as Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice Liz Truss has suggested, a ‘settled will of the people’? If so, how is this best expressed: through a referendum, through Parliament, or through petitions?

We have recently seen enormous e-petitions about Brexit and Donald Trump’s visit to the UK; but what is the history of petitioning in British political culture and how does the voice of the petitioner square with other forms of representation? What indeed, was the legal status of a petition, and how was this disputed?

In this lecture, Professor Mark Knights of the University of Warwick will assess how the will of the British people has been expressed through the device of petitioning throughout the ages, and draw lessons for the Britain of today.

Mark Knights is Professor of History at the University of Warwick, whose research focuses on the nature of partisanship and the relationship between ideas, discourse and action. He is currently writing a book for OUP about the history of corruption in Britain and its empire, and writes a blog about corruption past and present.

New Perspectives on the Psalms: Bill Goodman, “‘So will I ever sing praises to your name’. Psalms in contemporary music’ @ Ursell Room, Pusey House
May 2 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm

The Oxford Psalms Network is pleased to announce the second instalment of an ongoing series of public lectures ‘New Perspectives on the Psalms’, bringing into conversation contemporary artists, illustrators and musicians with speakers from a range of academic disciplines, including theology, literature, music and art. From the rich tradition of rabbinic commentary through the exegesis of the Church Fathers to contemporary popular song, the Psalms have always been at the core of Judaeo-Christian culture and belief. Lectures will cover topics from the earliest evidence for the singing of the Psalms in ancient Hebrew, Greek and Latin, through medieval and early Modern translations into English, French, German and other languages and intersections with other cultures and faiths, to modern responses in visual culture and music.

All lectures will take place at 6.15pm (arrival from 6.00) in the Ursell Room, Pusey House, St Giles, Oxford, followed by a drinks’ reception.

This is a public event – all are welcome!

Fighting the Long Defeat: Beauty and Nostalgia in Tolkien’s Sub-creation @ Grove Auditorium, Magdalen College
May 2 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Fighting the Long Defeat: Beauty and Nostalgia in Tolkien's Sub-creation @ Grove Auditorium, Magdalen College | England | United Kingdom

A lecture on Tolkien’s view of beauty, nostalgia and hope by Prof. Eduardo Segura.

Eduardo Segura is a well-known Tolkien scholar, author of a biographical study on the Oxford professor and a volume based on his doctoral dissertation on Tolkien’s Poetics as related to The Lord of the Rings. He has translated several of Tolkien’s works into Spanish, including The Monsters and the Critics, The Fall of Arthur and Beowulf, as well as Thomas Shippey’s The Road to Middle-earth and John Garth’s Tolkien and the Great War. Eduardo Segura is also the author of several essays on the Inklings and has co-authored and edited a volume on the film version of The Lord of the Rings by Peter Jackson.

The lecture will take place at 19:00 on Tuesday, 2th May, at the Grove Auditorium Magdalen College. Access to the College will be from the Longwall Street entrance, not from the Porter’s Lodge on High Street. Admission is free and open to both students and people from outside Oxford University.

Please note it is not necessary to bring your ticket to the event. The registration process is so we make sure we’re not oversubscribed.

Thank you!

Swifts – Jocelyne Hughes and Chris Mason @ Old School Room, St Peter’s Church
May 2 @ 7:45 pm – 9:15 pm
Swifts - Jocelyne Hughes and Chris Mason @ Old School Room, St Peter’s Church | England | United Kingdom

The talk will cover: identification of Swifts and differences between them, House Martins and Swallows; causes of recent population decline; what is being to to help; how local people can assist; and an outline of the Oxford project.

Dr Jocelyne Hughes is Director of Postgraduate Certificate in Ecological Survey Techniques at the Department of Continuing Education in Oxford. Chris Mason is Coordinator of the Cherwell Swifts Conservation Project. Both are project partners in the RSPB-led Oxford Swift City Project.

May
3
Wed
Balanced Constitutionlism @ Seminar Room F
May 3 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Balanced Constitutionlism @ Seminar Room F | England | United Kingdom

“Balanced Constitutionalism” examines the promise of the “new model” of judicial review against its performance in practice – by comparing judicial review under the Human Rights Act, 1998 (UK) to an exemplar of the old model of judicial review, the Indian Constitution. Chintan Chandrachud new work is based on a thorough analysis of judicial decisions and legislative responses in both nations, it argues that although the Human Rights Act fosters a more balanced allocation of powers between legislatures and courts than the Indian Constitution, it does so for a different reason from that offered by scholars. Balanced constitutionalism is not achieved through the legislative rejection of judicial decision-making about rights. Instead, the nature of the remedy under the Human Rights Act – the “declaration of incompatibility” – enables British courts to assert their genuine understandings of rights in situations in which Indian courts find it difficult to do so.

In this talk, the author focuses on the institutional apparatus accompanying the declaration of incompatibility in the UK on the one hand, and informal recommendations to change the law in India on the other. Although the declaration of incompatibility may look like a freestanding advisory remedy at first glance, it is given significant institutional purchase by the UK Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights (JCHR) and the European Court of Human Rights. The JCHR presses the government to engage with declarations of incompatibility, ensuring that silence is not realistic option. The European Court usually compels the Westminster Parliament to change the law following a declaration of incompatibility. The work of these institutions will be compared with India’s National Human Rights Commission, which finds it difficult to influence legislative activity on both of these counts.

‘Why Facebook matters, and what you might be getting wrong about it’ – Esra Dogramaci, senior digital editor, Deutsche Welle @ Barclay Room, Green Templeton College
May 3 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Reuters Institute seminars “The business and practice of journalism”
The following seminars will be given at 2pm on Wednesdays, normally in the Barclay Room, Green Templeton College.
Convenors: James Painter, Richard Sambrook

Esra Dogramaci, senior digital editor, Deutsche Welle
3 May: ‘Why Facebook matters, and what you might be getting wrong about it’

Nihilism in the 21st Century:A Conversation with Pankaj Mishra, Shruti Kapila and David Priestland @ Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College
May 3 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Nihilism in the 21st Century:A Conversation with Pankaj Mishra, Shruti Kapila and David Priestland @ Nissan Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Shruti Kapila lectures at the Faculty of History and is a Fellow and Director of Studies in History at Corpus Christi College, University of Cambridge. Her publications include a co-edited special issue ‘Bhagavad Gita and Modern Thought,’ Modern Intellectual History (2010), and, as editor, An Intellectual History for India (2010).

Pankaj Mishra’s From the Ruins of Empire: The Revolt Against the West and the Remaking of Asia became the first book by a non-Western writer to win Germany’s prestigious Leipzig Book Award for European Understanding. Mishra regular contributes literary and political essays to the New York Times, the New York Review of Books, The Guardian, the New Yorker, London Review of Books and Bloomberg View.

David Priestland is Professor of Modern History at St Edmund Hall. His landmark overview of world communism, The Red Flag: Communism and the Making of the Modern World, was published in 2010. His following book, Merchant, Soldier, Sage: A New History of Power (2012), discussed the rise of market cultures in global history. He is now working on the history of market liberalism with special reference to the former communist world.

May
4
Thu
‘Rebel’s or farmer’s best friend? The Janus face of ‘blood diamonds’ and other conflict minerals’ with Dr Anouk Rigterink @ Oxford Martin School
May 4 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

“Diamonds are a rebel’s best friend” is one striking way to sum up the belief that valuable minerals spur violent conflict. The Kimberley Process Certification Scheme and the US Dodd Frank Act Section 1502, now on the chopping block under the Trump administration, are meant to counteract this: they aim to prevent trade in minerals unless it can be proven that revenues from these do not support armed groups.

Research however, suggests that the relationship between minerals and violent conflict may be more complex than this quote presumes. Valuable minerals may indeed fund or motivate rebel movements. But they may also provide a livelihood to millions of people, making them better off and less vulnerable to be recruited into armed groups. And revenue from minerals can also flows to countries’ governments and their armies.

In this lecture Dr Anouk S. Rigterink, Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Blavatnik School of Government, Department of Economics’ Oxford Centre for the Analysis of Resource Rich Economies, will address the contradictory faces of ‘conflict minerals’ and their implications for how effective we think current policies to tackle them can be.

Towards the ASEAN Economic Community: A Conversation with ASEAN Ambassadors to the United Kingdom @ Investcorp Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College
May 4 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Towards the ASEAN Economic Community: A Conversation with ASEAN Ambassadors to the United Kingdom @ Investcorp Lecture Theatre, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Speaker(s):
Rizal Sukma (Ambassador to the United Kingdom, Republic of Indonesia), Antonio M. Lagdameo (Ambassador to the United Kingdom, Republic of the Philippines)
Chair: Matthew J. Walton
The ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) was formally established at the end of 2015 but progress on more robust regional economic integration has been slow. Levels of integration within the region vary widely and significant development gaps still hinder the growth of some members. While ASEAN’s leadership continues to promote integration on a variety of platforms, domestic politics and regional conflicts (such as the South China Sea dispute and the persistent refugee crisis) also threaten to undermine further strengthening of the organisation. In this roundtable discussion, Ambassadors to the UK from several ASEAN countries will discuss the challenges faced in realising the ASEAN Economic Community, and regional integration more generally. They will discuss the interests and concerns of their own countries as well as the benefits of integration and the future trajectory of the regional body.

Oragnised with the Oxford Philippines Society and Oxford Indonesia Society.

Progressive trends in Upper Palaeolithic cave art @ The Mitre
May 4 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Progressive trends in Upper Palaeolithic cave art @ The Mitre | England | United Kingdom

Talk followed by questions and discussion

May
5
Fri
Surgical Grand Rounds – ‘Innovations in access surgery’ @ Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital
May 5 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am
Surgical Grand Rounds - ‘Innovations in access surgery’ @ Lecture Theatre 1, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital  | England | United Kingdom

As part of the Surgical Grand Rounds lecture series, Mr James Gilbert (Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust) and Dr Simon Knight (Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, Oxford University) will discuss innovations in access surgery.

Volcanoes: Natural Disaster Narratives and the Environment in Caribbean Literature @ Weston Library
May 5 @ 12:30 pm – 2:00 pm
Volcanoes: Natural Disaster Narratives and the Environment in Caribbean Literature @ Weston Library | England | United Kingdom

‘New Directions in Caribbean Studies Seminar’, TORCH, Race and Resistance Programme, the Fiction and Human Rights Network, and the Bodleian Library are hosting an event on ‘Volcanoes: Natural Disaster Narratives and the Environment in Caribbean Literature’. This event accompanies the Bodleian Library exhibition. More details about the exhibition can be found here.

Please join us for a panel discussion where researchers on Caribbean literature reflect on the current Bodleian Volcanoes exhibition and explore more broadly how the theme of natural disaster narratives and the environment shape other aspects of Caribbean literature.

A light lunch is available.

All welcome.

Speakers include:

Richard Scholar (The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages)

Annie Castro (The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages)

Vanessa Lee (The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages)

Jemima Paine (The Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages)

Chair: Imaobong Umoren (Faculty of History)

OxMCEF Interactive Workshop – Finding the Right Classification for Your Medical Device @ John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2 (Tingewick Foyer)
May 5 @ 3:30 pm – 5:00 pm
OxMCEF Interactive Workshop - Finding the Right Classification for Your Medical Device @ John Radcliffe Hospital, Lecture Theatre 2 (Tingewick Foyer) | England | United Kingdom

This is a hands on session which will see you actively determining the classification of a range of real devices based on the medical directive, with interactive discussion on how our interpretations of the guideline differ (if so).

Please bring your laptop / phone so you can work on the interactive cases with us.

This will be a lively event and should be fun to end the day!

‘From black and white to read all over – political reporting in a digital age’ – Isabel Oakeshott, political journalist and commentator, and author of ‘Call me Dave’ @ Butler Room, Nuffield College
May 5 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Reuters Institute / Nuffield College Media & Politics seminars
The following seminars will be given at 5pm on Fridays, normally in the Butler Room, Nuffield College.
Convenors: Andrew Dilnot, David Levy, James Painter

Isabel Oakeshott, political journalist and commentator, and author of ‘Call me Dave’
5 May: ‘From black and white to read all over – political reporting in a digital age’

Joe Klein & Paul Solman: “Trump’s America: a Political and an Economics Journalist Take Stock @ Lecture Theatre, Mansfield College
May 5 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Joe Klein, a renowned American political columnist for Time magazine and author of Primary Colours. Paul Solman, Emmy-award-winning business, economics and occasional art correspondent for PBS NewsHour

Alexander Armstrong on “The British Stiff Upper Lip: Noises, Sounds and Sweet Airs” @ Pitt Rivers Museum
May 5 @ 6:15 pm – 9:00 pm

For this year’s Beatrice Blackwood evening lecture Alexander Armstrong will give us a light-hearted spree through that particular constellation of cultural strands that we like to call Britishness, in the jocular style that we know from his TV appearances. He will explore the Pitt Rivers Museum collection of exotic collection of treasures from around the world- expect accents, flora, fauna and even squawks!
Followed by refreshments in the Pitt Rivers Museum

May
6
Sat
Oxford Medfest – Eros & Thanatos: Matters of Life and Death @ Oriel College
May 6 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Eros & Thanatos: Matters of Life and Death.

Medfest @ Oxford

Arrive @ the Harris Lecture Theatre (on the Island Site, map available soon) for 4:15pm

Sponsored by the Royal College of Psychiatrists

FREE EVENT with NIBBLES!

Past. Present. Future.

Religion. Euthanasia. History. Cryogenics. Philosophy. A Good Death. Transhumanism. Palliative Care. Artificial Intelligence. Grief.

Immortality.

The subject of life and death is one we are constantly faced with in medicine, yet one which is rarely formally discussed. Whether it’s someone in advanced age fearing death knocking on their door, a mother consoling her terminally ill child, or when through good medical care, patients are given a second chance at life. We not only hope our films will stir up some good discussions, but will also encourage you to question your own preconceptions about life and death.

Read more about the theme here:
http://www.medfest2017.com/what-s-it-all-about

We’ll be watching the films with some discussion with our panelists and you, in the audience in between.

Panellists TBA.

May
8
Mon
Research Uncovered—A Linked Open Data Buddhist Text Archive @ Weston Library Lecture Theatre
May 8 @ 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm
Research Uncovered—A Linked Open Data Buddhist Text Archive @ Weston Library Lecture Theatre | England | United Kingdom

Buddhist thought and culture has been expressed in a surprisingly large number of languages from a huge variety of sources, spanning an immense temporal and geographical range. The earliest works were written in an Indic language closely related to Sanskrit, but the first actual Buddhist canon was compiled in Pali in Sri Lanka in the early centuries of the first millennium A.D. While Sanskrit versions of early writings were never compiled into a canon as such, Pali, Sanskrit, and Prakrit texts began to be translated into Chinese in the first century CE. By the sixth century, the Chinese had compiled their first version of the canon. Chinese Buddhists also wrote many other valuable and important works on Buddhist ritual, story, literature, biography, monastic law, and philosophy outside of the canon itself. Later, the Tibetans began translating Buddhist scriptures into their own language. The first Tibetan canon was systematized in the late thirteenth century. In addition to the canon, Tibetans wrote tens of thousands of important extra-canonical works as well. Beginning in the thirteenth century, the Tibetan canon was translated into Mongolian. In Southeast Asia, where the Pali canon is used, we find many extra-canonical works of Buddhist narrative, poetry, ritual, philosophy, and monastic law, written in the vernacular languages of Sinhala, Burmese, Thai, Cambodian, and Lao. Canonical and important extra-canonical literature is also to be found in Western and Central Asia as well as in Indonesia. The same is true for East Asian countries such as Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. Finally, many works that have been written in or translated into English and other Western languages.

Buddhist Digital Resource Center (BDRC) has developed a preservation ecosystem to digitally preserve source texts and document Buddhist cultural heritage. The preservation of Buddhist texts requires the ability to document the complex and multi-faceted elements of textual history. Relationships between texts in different languages, encoded in regional scripts spanning a broad historical range requires scholarly analysis and validation. Using the power of the semantic web, cultural heritage and digital asset metadata is modeled as linked open data governed by an RDF ontology and expressed as JSON-LD documents. Source documents are scanned in a rapidly growing 12 million page image archive with open APIs to provide page-level access. A full-text resource generated from transcripts and optical character recognition, based on a multi-layer text architecture, provides a deep search environment. In this presentation I will explore BUDA’s architecture and capabilities, including deep search, faceted browse, SPARQL querying, multi-layer texts and web annotations, and strategies for multi-language scholarly metadata creation and management.

‘The concept of time in biology, and the unity of life’ with Prof Brian J. Enquist @ Oxford Martin School
May 8 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

This is a joint event between the Oxford Martin School and the Oxford Centre for Tropical Forests

One of our biggest technological innovations is that of time keeping. From the atomic to the astronomical scales, our technology has enabled us to precisely measure time. Our timekeeping uses clocks that all tick along the same time scale – a time scale that is also relative to how we perceive the passage of time.

For biology, the passage of time, however, is not only different but reveals deep truths about life. Across the diversity of life, the passage of time from bacteria to humans to giant Redwood trees is perceived differently. Instead of a constant ticking of a clock – the pace of life is reflected in scaling laws that characterise the variation in the cycles of heartbeats, metabolism, growth and reproduction.

In this lecture Professor Brian J. Enquist, Oxford Martin Visiting Fellow, will introduce a second concept of time – physiological time. Physiological time enables us to better understand why we age, the emergence of disease and cancer, the functioning of ecosystems, and the diversity of life. Physiological time is one of the most significant characteristics of life and helps unite the study of biology. A deeper question is what ultimately sets the pace of life.

As will be discussed, the search for a universal biological clock that unites life’s cycles is the most intriguing Holy Grail of biology.

This event will be followed by a drinks reception, all welcome

May
9
Tue
The Spectral Wound: Sexual Violence, Public Memories and the Bangladesh War of 1971 @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College
May 9 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
The Spectral Wound: Sexual Violence, Public Memories and the Bangladesh War of 1971 @ Fellows' Dining Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Following the 1971 Bangladesh War, the Bangladesh government publicly designated the thousands of women raped by the then West Pakistani (later Pakistani) military and their local East Pakistani (later Bangladeshi) collaborators as birangonas, (“brave women”). Spectral Wound aims to map out the public memories of sexual violence of the Bangladesh Liberation War of 1971 (Muktijuddho). Nayanika Mookherjee demonstrates that while this celebration of birangonas as heroes keeps them in the public memories, they exist in the public consciousness as what Mookherjee calls a spectral wound. Dominant representations of birangonas as dehumanized victims with disheveled hair, and rejected by their communities create this wound, the effects of which flatten the diversity of their experiences through which birangonas have lived with this violence of wartime rape. The book ethnographically examines the circulation of images, press and literary representations, testimonies of rape among survivors of sexual violence and their families, the left-liberal civil society and state actors. In critically examining the pervasiveness of the birangona construction, Mookherjee decentres the assumption of silence relating to wartime rape and opens the possibility for a more poitico-economic and ethical inquiry into the sexuality of war.

Trumponomics @ Andrew Wiles Building
May 9 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Trumponomics @ Andrew Wiles Building | England | United Kingdom

Will the US and global economy thrive, or barely survive, under Trumponomics? Will erratic policymaking and populist pandering lead to economic catastrophe? Or will business-friendly reforms and expansionary fiscal and monetary policies bring unprecedented prosperity? A distinguished panel of economists – Kenneth Rogoff of Harvard University, Martin Wolf of the Financial Times, and John Muellbauer of Oxford Univesity – will debate the early economic consequences of Trumpism and how policies are likely to take shape in key areas such as trade, tax, infrastructure, finance, and monetary policy.

Kenneth Rogoff, Professor of Economics and Public Policy at Harvard University and recipient of the 2011 Deutsche Bank Prize in Financial Economics, was the chief economist of the International Monetary Fund from 2001 to 2003. The co-author of This Time is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly, his new book, The Curse of Cash, was released in August 2016. He is the Visiting Sanjaya Lall Professor at the University of Oxford.

Martin Wolf is chief economics commentator at the Financial Times, London. He was awarded the CBE (Commander of the British Empire) in 2000 “for services to financial journalism”.

Professor John Muellbauer is a Senior Research Fellow of Nuffield College, Professor of Economics and a Senior Fellow of the Institute for New Economic Thinking at the Oxford Martin School, Oxford University.

Pursuer or Pursued: Reflections on Biography @ Wolfson College
May 9 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm
Pursuer or Pursued: Reflections on Biography @ Wolfson College | England | United Kingdom

This lecture is given in memory of Professor Richard Ellmann, Fellow of Wolfson College from 1984–1987, to mark the 30th anniversary of his death and of the publication of his biography of Oscar Wilde.

Professor Richard Holmes is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, a Fellow of the British Academy and was awarded an OBE in 1992. He was awarded an honorary Litt.D. in 2000 by the University of East Anglia, where he was appointed Professor of Biographical Studies in September 2001. He is author of The Age of Wonder (2008), an examination of the life and work of the scientists of the Romantic age who laid the foundations of modern science, and Falling Upwards: How we Took to the Air (2013). The Age of Wonder was shortlisted for the 2009 Samuel Johnson Prize.

May
10
Wed
Public Lecture with Dr Tasuku Honjo: Serendipities of Acquired Immunity @ Blavatnik School of Government
May 10 @ 9:30 am – 10:45 am
Public Lecture with Dr Tasuku Honjo: Serendipities of Acquired Immunity @ Blavatnik School of Government | England | United Kingdom

If the greatest enemies of humankind in the 20th century were infectious diseases, cancer has clearly become the major foe in the 21st century. Acquired immunity holds the keys to overcoming both of these difficult medical challenges. Dr Honjo presents the fortuitous developments that he has experienced during his time as a researcher, leading to the discovery that PD-1 inhibition could be effective in treating cancer. This new breakthrough immunotherapy is being hailed as a ‘penicillin moment’ in cancer treatment.

Dr Tasuku Honjo is the 2016 Kyoto Prize Laureate for Basic Sciences

Public Lecture with Dr Martha Craven Nussbaum: Ageing and Stigma @ Blavatnik School of Government
May 10 @ 11:30 am – 1:15 pm
Public Lecture with Dr Martha Craven Nussbaum: Ageing and Stigma @ Blavatnik School of Government | England | United Kingdom

Age is the only category of discrimination that includes all humans. However, ageing people are stigmatised in popular culture and discourse, and regarded with a disgust closely linked to fear. Dr Nussbaum argues that stigma against the ageing is a social problem, producing unhappiness and injustice such as discrimination in employment and social interactions, not to mention what she calls a ‘huge social evil’ – that of compulsory retirement.

Dr Martha Craven Nussbaum is the 2016 Kyoto Prize Laureate for Arts and Philosophy.

‘The use of women experts in the media’ – Suzanne Franks, professor of journalism, City University, London @ Barclay Room, Green Templeton College
May 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm

Reuters Institute seminars “The business and practice of journalism”
The following seminars will be given at 2pm on Wednesdays, normally in the Barclay Room, Green Templeton College.
Convenors: James Painter, Richard Sambrook

Suzanne Franks, professor of journalism, City University, London
10 May: ‘The use of women experts in the media’

The Southeast Asia Seminar: Postgraduate Research Session @ Deakin Room, St Antony's College
May 10 @ 2:00 pm
The Southeast Asia Seminar: Postgraduate Research Session @ Deakin Room, St Antony's College | England | United Kingdom

Incorporating the Delphi Method within Poverty Measurement, a Case Study of West Java, Indonesia
Putu Natih (Trinity, Social Policy and Intervention)
Reading Rejection: What does the Rhetoric of Southeast-Asian Diplomacy tell us about the Regional Response to the Rohingya crisis?
Theophilus Kwek (Merton, Refugee Studies)
The Evolution of Jakarta’s Flooding Policy
Thanti Octavianti (Trinity, Geography)
A Comparative Analysis of the Evolution of Migrant Worker Desirability in Malaysia and Indonesia since the 1970s
Wai Siong See Tho (Lincoln, International Development)

Public Lecture with Dr Takeo Kanade: Think like an amateur, do as an expert: Fun research in computer vision and robotics @ Blavatnik School of Government
May 10 @ 2:30 pm – 3:45 pm
Public Lecture with Dr Takeo Kanade: Think like an amateur, do as an expert: Fun research in computer vision and robotics @ Blavatnik School of Government | England | United Kingdom

For Dr Kanade, good research derives from solving real-world problems and delivering useful results to society. As a roboticist, he participated in developing a wide range of computer-vision systems and autonomous robots, including human-face recognition, autonomously-driven cars, computer-assisted surgical robots, robot helicopters, biological live cell tracking through a microscope, and EyeVision, a system used for sports broadcast. Dr Kanade will share insights into his projects and discuss how his “Think like an amateur, do as an expert” maxim interacts with problems and people.

Dr Takeo Kanade is the 2016 Kyoto Prize Laureate for Advanced Technology.