May
21
Tue
“Unlocking digital competition” with Prof Jason Furman @ Oxford Martin School
May 21 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

Is competition in the digital economy desirable? Does it currently exist? Is it possible? Is there anything policy can do?

This talk addresses all of these questions and presents the recommendations of the Digital Competition Expert Panel which was chaired by Jason Furman and recently presented its recommendations to the government.

Weidenfeld Lectures: The Aerial Warfare of Images – Durs Grünbein “Beyond Literature: or, on the intrusion of history into the narrative of one’s own life” @ St Anne's College, Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre
May 21 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Tuesday 7th May 2019: The Violet Postage Stamp
Thursday 9th May 2019: Landscape in Chains
Tuesday 21st May 2019: The Aerial Warfare of Images
Thursday 23rd May 2019: For the Dying Calves
The lectures will explore the way history impinges on ordinary lives and finds its way
into the literary imagination. Anyone born in the twentieth century – this century of
wars and divisions – will have found themselves already historicised even as a child.
These lectures consciously take account of, and reflect, the breaks and discontinuities
of German history. True to the modus operandi of the author’s own poems, they
employ a collage technique that demands the imaginative collaboration of reader and
audience alike.

May
22
Wed
Blackwell’s Mental Health Festival – The High Sheriff and the Black Dog @ Blackwell's Bookshop
May 22 @ 2:30 pm – 3:30 pm

We are thrilled to announce that throughout our Mental Health Festival we will be hosting Sirius, the Black Dog, in our Children’s Department. Based on Winston Churchill’s metaphore for depression, this black dog is a 4ft resin statue which has been travelling around schools in Oxfordshire to raise awareness of mental health, in association with the charity, SANE and the High Sheriff of Oxfordshire.

To celebrate this, we are going to be joined by Richard Venables, the High Sheriff of Oxfordshire and Marjorie Wallace, the CEO of SANE. They will be talking about the Black Dog’s journey around Oxfordshire and the importance of mental health awareness for children and young people.

ScreenTalk Oxfordshire Presents: Harnessing the Power of Video in Business Communications @ Curzon Oxford
May 22 @ 6:15 pm – 9:15 pm

On Wednesday 22 May, ScreenTalk Oxfordshire proudly presents Harnessing the Power of Video in Business Communications.
An evening with Tim May, MD of Strange Films and Music, talking with Toby Low – MD of MerchantCantos an international agency specialising in bringing creativity to critical business communications; Scott Shillum – CEO of Vismedia, Winner of the 2018 Digital Impact Awards and a pioneer in creating interactive, immersive content fused with cutting edge technology; Clare Holt – Founder of Nice Tree Films in Oxford and a member of ScreenTalk provides videos for businesses, public sector organisations, charities and education; Nicky Woodhouse – Founder of Woodhouse Video Production, award-winning female director of branded content and TVCs for online and broadcast.

Join us on Wednesday 22 May from 18:15 for a drink in the downstairs Lounge Bar, Curzon, Westgate Centre in Oxford, and why not try the Curzon’s excellent Pizza – great quality! At 19:00 Tim May will be talking to Toby Low, Scott Shillum, Clare Holt and Nicky Woodhouse. Afterwards there will be Shout Outs from ScreenTalk members and facilitated networking. At ScreenTalk events we run a Card/Cash Bar so please join us and take advantage of the opportunity to catch up and network.

We expect this event to be popular and can only take pre-booked (free) tickets for entry.

Join the conversation! ScreenTalk events are an opportunity to forge and strengthen contacts in Film, TV and Associated Media.
For further information and to sign up to our mailing list please email [email protected]

May
23
Thu
The Creativity Code @ Department for Continuing Education
May 23 @ 4:30 pm – 5:30 pm
The Creativity Code @ Department for Continuing Education

Will a computer ever compose a symphony, write a prize-winning novel, or paint a masterpiece? And if so, would we be able to tell the difference? Marcus du Sautoy examines the nature of creativity, as well as providing an essential guide into how algorithms work, and the mathematical rules underpinning them. He asks how much of our emotional response to art is a product of our brains reacting to pattern and structure, and exactly what it is to be creative in mathematics, art, language and music.

This lecture is open to all, and is designed for researchers from all disciplines and members of the public. The lecture will take place in the Lecture Theatre at Rewley House, Oxford. Tea and coffee will be served in the Common Room from 4pm. The lecture will be followed by Q&As.

Marcus du Sautoy is the Simonyi Professor for the Public Understanding of Science and Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford. He is author of six books including his most recent books The Creativity Code (Fourth Estate 2019). He has presented numerous radio and TV series including a four part landmark TV series for the BBC called The Story of Maths. He works extensively with a range of arts organisations bringing science alive for the public from The Royal Opera House to the Glastonbury Festival. His play I is a Strange Loop (in which he is both actor and author) is part of the Barbican’s Life Rewired season. He received an OBE for services to science in the 2010 New Year’s Honours List and was made a Fellow of the Royal Society in 2016.

“Navigating knowledge: new tools for the journey” with Dr Penny Mealy @ Oxford Martin School
May 23 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Like the wind, knowledge can be difficult to see or grasp, but if well-harnessed, it can help us do extraordinary things. In this talk, Dr Penny Mealy will discuss how novel analytical tools are providing new insights into the use of knowledge in society, and highlight implications for economic development, inequality and the transition to the green economy.

Weidenfeld Lectures: For the Dying Calve – Durs Grünbein “Beyond Literature: or, on the intrusion of history into the narrative of one’s own life” @ St Anne's College, Tsuzuki Lecture Theatre
May 23 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

Tuesday 7th May 2019: The Violet Postage Stamp
Thursday 9th May 2019: Landscape in Chains
Tuesday 21st May 2019: The Aerial Warfare of Images
Thursday 23rd May 2019: For the Dying Calves
The lectures will explore the way history impinges on ordinary lives and finds its way
into the literary imagination. Anyone born in the twentieth century – this century of
wars and divisions – will have found themselves already historicised even as a child.
These lectures consciously take account of, and reflect, the breaks and discontinuities
of German history. True to the modus operandi of the author’s own poems, they
employ a collage technique that demands the imaginative collaboration of reader and
audience alike.

The Politics of Higher Education – who care’s about universities? @ Oxford Brookes University, Headington Campus, John Henry Brookes Building, Oxford
May 23 @ 6:15 pm – 7:15 pm

This lecture is being given by social responsibility expert, Professor Andy Westwood – the former President of the OECD’s Forum for Social Innovation and an adviser at the IMF. Andy is Professor of Government Practice and Vice Dean of Humanities at the University of Manchester and a Visiting Professor of Further and Higher Education at the University of Wolverhampton.

May
24
Fri
Artificial Intelligence: How to Ensure it Benefits Patients? @ Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital
May 24 @ 1:15 pm – 2:15 pm
Artificial Intelligence: How to Ensure it Benefits Patients? @ Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital

As part of the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre’s Open Day, a panel of experts will discuss how artificial intelligence can be used to benefit patients and the challenges that it presents. The discussion will be chaired by Professor Lionel Tarassenko, world-leading expert in the application of signal processing to medical systems.

Breakthroughs in Asthma Treatment @ Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital
May 24 @ 2:30 pm – 3:10 pm
Breakthroughs in Asthma Treatment @ Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital

As part of the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre’s Open Day, Professor Ian Pavord will discuss emerging treatments for asthma, a condition that affects 5.4 million people in the UK. Professor Pavord is an internationally renowned researcher with a particular interest in asthma, chronic pulmonary disease and chronic cough.

Stopping the Spread of a Superfungus in Intensive Care @ Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital
May 24 @ 3:20 pm – 4:10 pm
Stopping the Spread of a Superfungus in Intensive Care @ Lecture Theatre 2, Academic Centre, John Radcliffe Hospital

As part of the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre’s Open Day, Dr David Eyre, an infectious diseases researcher and clinician, and Dr Katie Jeffery, Consultant in Microbiology at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, will discuss how they used infection prevention and control best practice, whole genome sequencing and electronic patient data to halt an outbreak of a potentially deadly fungal pathogen at the John Radcliffe Hospital between 2015 and 2017.

May
29
Wed
5th Annual Oxford Business & Poverty Conference @ Sheldonian Theatre
May 29 @ 2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
5th Annual Oxford Business & Poverty Conference @ Sheldonian Theatre

The 5th Annual Oxford Business and Poverty Conference will feature a diverse range of speakers addressing the Paradoxes of Prosperity. Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/5th-annual-oxford-business-poverty-conference-tickets-57733957822
Hosted at the Sheldonian Theatre, the conference will feature keynotes by:
Lant Pritchett: RISE Research Director at the Blavatnik School of Government, former Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Development
Efosa Ojomo: Global Prosperity Lead and Senior Researcher at the Clayton Christensen Institute
John Hoffmire: Director of Center on Business and Poverty and Research Associate at Kellogg Colleges at Center For Mutual and Employee-owned Business at Oxford University
Ananth Pai: Executive Director, Bharath Beedi Works Pvt. Ltd. and Director, Bharath Auto Cars Pvt
Laurel Stanfield: Assistant Professor of Marketing at Bentley College in Massachusetts
Grace Cheng: Greater China’s Country Manager for Russell Reynolds Associates
Madhusudan Jagadish: 2016 Graduate MBA, Said Business School, University of Oxford
Tentative Schedule:
2:15-2:20 Welcome
2:20-2:50 Efosa Ojomo, co-author of The Prosperity Paradox, sets the stage for the need for innovation in development
2:50-3:20 John Hoffmire, Ananth Pai and Mudhusudan Jagadish explain how the Prosperity Paradox can be used in India as a model to create good jobs for poor women
3:20-3:40 Break
3:40-4:10 Laurel Steinfeld speaks to issues of gender, development and business – addressing paradoxes related to prosperity
4:10-4:40 Grace Cheng, speaks about the history of China’s use of disruptive innovations to develop its economy
4:40-5:15 Break
5:15-6 Lant Pritchett talks on Pushing Past Poverty: Paths to Prosperity
6:30-8 Dinner at the Rhodes House – Purchase tickets after signing up for the conference
Sponsors include: Russell Reynolds, Employee Ownership Foundation, Ananth Pai Foundation and others

May
30
Thu
“Is the human species slowing down?” with Prof Danny Dorling @ Oxford Martin School
May 30 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

In Origin of Species, Charles Darwin described how a population explosion occurs and called the time of population explosion “ favourable seasons”, he was not to know it, but such circumstances arose for his own species at around the time of his own birth. However, the favourable seasons for human population growth were not experienced favourably, with times of great social dislocation from small scale enclosure to global colonisation. Now those seasons are over, we have experienced the first ever sustained slowdown in the rate of global human population growth. This has been the case for at least one human generation. However, we are not just slowing down in terms of how many children we have, but in almost everything else we do, other than in the rise in global temperatures that we are recording and that we have to live with. It can be argued that there is even a slowdown in such unexpected areas as debt, publishing, and in the total amount useful information being produced.

If this is true – that humanity is slowing down in almost everything that we do – what does this mean? What measurements suggest that slowdown is true? And if so much is still rising, albeit at slower and slower rates – is that such a great change? Finally how might the slowdown impact on economic thought. In many ways economics was the science of the great acceleration; a science that makes most sense when markets are expanding and demand is rising. What kind of an economics is needed in a world where enormous and accelerating growth has stopped being the normality?

Book Launch: A Suffragette in America @ Oxford Town Hall
May 30 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Published for the first time, this is Sylvia Pankhurst’s text about her two tours of North America in 1911 and 1912. An English militant suffragette, she was expected to appeal for support from progressive elites. Instead, Pankhurst identified with the marginalised and recorded their stories.

The result was a powerful indictment of American capitalism. Repulsed by the stark inequalities, Pankhurst was nevertheless inspired by the struggles for change. She vividly recalls a courageous strike of laundry workers in New York, the appalling conditions in the prison cells of Chicago, and the horrific racism she witnessed in Tennessee.

This exciting work reveals Pankhurst’s efforts to link the women’s movement to wider emancipatory struggles – efforts that would change the course of suffrage history.

Edited and introduced by Katherine Connelly who will be in conversation with Dana Mills, author of a forthcoming biography of Rosa Luxemburg. Chaired by Tracy Walsh, Programme Coordinator of the Oxford International Women’s Festival.

My Mother Runs in Zig Zags @ The North Wall Arts Centre
May 30 @ 7:30 pm – Jun 1 @ 9:30 pm
My Mother Runs in Zig Zags @ The North Wall Arts Centre

Coriander Theatre presents a new play ‘My Mother Runs in Zig-Zags’ at the North Wall Arts Centre, 30th May – 1st June 2019, 7:30pm, Saturday Matinee 2:30pm.

Sometimes, race and trauma are like leaky old pipes: you can’t even have a friend over for dinner without something spilling out everywhere and flooding your life in the most unexpected way.

A conversation between friends becomes a journey to the Lebanese and Nigerian civil wars. Half-remembered worlds of violent oral history invade the kitchen and layer themselves over everyday life, shining light on the laughter that heals intergenerational traumas, and celebrating the overflowings and excesses of a life shaped by migration.

With an original musical score, a chorus of performance poets and contemporary dancers, and stories passed on from a generation of migrants, My mother runs in zig-zags is a bold new tragicomedy, devised by the best of Oxford University’s BAME actors and performers.

Age Guidance: 12+

My mother runs in zig zags

Jun
4
Tue
Why wild bees matter – Roselle Chapman @ St Margaret's Institute
Jun 4 @ 8:00 pm – 9:15 pm
Why wild bees matter - Roselle Chapman @ St Margaret's Institute

Our wild bees and other pollinators are so important, but they are still the unsung heroes of the environment, gardens and countryside and continue to decline in number and range. The talk will identify what we can all do to help wild bees. Many of the actions we take to protect one pollinator species, such as flower rich habitat creation and reduction in pesticide use, will assist biodiversity as a whole.

Jun
6
Thu
“Changing technology, changing economics” with Prof Diane Coyle @ Oxford Martin School
Jun 6 @ 5:00 pm – 6:15 pm

Digital technologies are changing economics in two ways. The characteristics of an increasingly digital economy raise questions about economic analysis in domains ranging from competition policy to corporate finance, while new data sources and methodologies challenge economists to develop new empirical approaches.

Jun
11
Tue
Can spying be principled in this digital age? @ St Cross College
Jun 11 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

The question of how far a state should authorise the peacetime collection and use of intelligence gathered by secret agents and by interception of communications has long been a thorny issue of public policy. Today, new ethical and legal questions arise from the ability to access in bulk personal information from social media and from Internet use and to apply artificial intelligence trained algorithms to mine data for intelligence and law enforcement purposes. In his talk Sir David Omand, a former director of GCHQ, will lay out an ethical framework for thinking about these powerful developments in modern digital intelligence.

Speaker: Professor Sir David Omand GCB is a visiting professor in the War Studies Department, King’s College London and at PSIA, Sciences Po, Paris. He was previously UK Security and Intelligence Coordinator, Permanent Secretary of the Home Office and Director, GCHQ. He is the author of Securing the State (Hurst, 2020) and, with Professor Mark Phythian, Principled Spying: the Ethics of Secret Intelligence, (Oxford University Press, 2018).

Transnational Litigation, Big Pharma, and Billion Dollar Claims @ Wolfson College
Jun 11 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm
Transnational Litigation, Big Pharma, and Billion Dollar Claims @ Wolfson College

In this lecture, lawyer Mary Bartkus shares her firsthand experience of the international litigation of multibillion dollar claims against Big Pharma when a medication taken by millions of users worldwide is withdrawn.

She will address the impact of the withdrawal and United States litigation on regulators, legislators, and on cross-border litigation in common law and civil law jurisdictions across six continents.

When Merck & Co., Inc. withdrew the innovative painkiller Vioxx (Rofecoxib) from more than eighty countries following evidence that high-dosage use could cause an increased risk of heart attack and stroke, thousands of US citizens brought personal injury claims.

A Texas jury awarded more than $250 million to one individual claimant. Although that verdict was reduced and later overturned on appeal, and most US juries found for the company, with more than 26,000 US court claims yet to be tried and another 14,100 waiting to be filed, the company agreed to resolve the US personal injury claims for $4.85 billion, a deal said to be “favourable” to the company and “clearly at the low end of general expectations”.

Internationally, claims were brought in waves following developments in the US. These international cases would be heard and decided in jurisdictions with different traditions and conditions for litigants.

In Australia, a justice of the Federal Court dismissed all claims against Merck & Co., Inc. in class litigation, finding “Merck had done everything that might reasonably be expected of it in the discharge of its duty of care”. The Full Court overturned an award of damages to the individual representative claimant for failure to establish causation, and awarded full costs to the company; the High Court denied claimants leave to appeal. Claims of remaining group members then were resolved.

In England, claimants abandoned multi-party actions filed in the High Court. In Scotland, the parties litigated and resolved individual actions. In Canada, the parties litigated and resolved overlapping class and individual actions in ten provinces. Courts regularly dismissed cases in civil law jurisdictions.

The lecture considers this landmark international litigation alongside the challenges companies face when investing billions of dollars to develop innovative medications, and asks: Who won and who lost?

Mary E. Bartkus is Special Counsel at Hughes Hubbard & Reed LLP, a member of the Bars of New York and New Jersey; previously Executive Director & Senior Counsel, Merck & Co., Inc.

Jun
13
Thu
“The future of the corporation, economy and society” with Prof Colin Mayer & Sir Paul Collier @ Oxford Martin School
Jun 13 @ 5:15 pm – 6:30 pm

Professor Sir Paul Collier and Professor Colin Mayer CBE will share the latest thinking and research into the future of capitalism and the corporation to understand how business might be changed to make it work better for society. The speakers will bring together their new books, The Future of Capitalism: Facing The New Anxieties and Prosperity: Better Business Makes the Greater Good, alongside the British Academy’s Future of the Corporation programme research to pose serious questions of our economic system.

This talk will be followed by a drinks reception, book sale and signing, all welcome

Jun
20
Thu
“New economic and moral foundations for the Anthropocene” with Prof Eric Beinhocker @ Oxford Martin School
Jun 20 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

The biosphere and econosphere are deeply interlinked and both are in crisis. Industrial, fossil-fuel based capitalism delivered major increases in living standards from the mid-18th through late-20th centuries, but at the cost of widespread ecosystem destruction, planetary climate change, and a variety of economic injustices. Furthermore, over the past 40 years, the gains of growth have flowed almost exclusively to the top 10%, fuelling populist anger across many countries, endangering both democracy and global action on climate change.

This talk will argue that underlying the current dominant model of capitalism are a set of theories and ideologies that are outdated, unscientific, and morally unsound. New foundations can be built from modern understandings of human behaviour, complex systems science, and broad moral principles. By changing the ideologies, narratives, and memes that govern our economic system, we can create the political space required for the policies and actions required to rapidly transform to a sustainable and just economic system.

Jun
26
Wed
The secret diary of a health ethnographer – what’s it *really* like doing qualitative observation in operating rooms, ambulances, triage call centres and other health care settings? @ Rewley House
Jun 26 @ 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm
The secret diary of a health ethnographer - what's it *really* like doing qualitative observation in operating rooms, ambulances, triage call centres and other health care settings? @ Rewley House

This guest lecture draws on nearly thirty years’ experience of doing qualitative research in a variety of health settings that contain people, blood, injury, disease, emotions, and technologies. Prof Catherine Pope will describe some of the practical difficulties and everyday challenges of doing ethnography in these environments, and reflect on what it feels like to be an embodied researcher.

Catherine Pope is Professor of Medical Sociology, and, from July 2019, will be based at the Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford. She has championed the use of qualitative methods in health research, and played a leading role in developing qualitative evidence synthesis. Her research includes studies of NHS urgent and emergency care, evaluations of health service organisation and reconfiguration, and projects about everyday health care work.

This talk is being held as part of the Qualitative Research Methods course which is part of the Evidence-Based Health Care Programme. This is a free event and members of the public are welcome to attend.

Oct
1
Tue
Track and Sign – the naturalist’s forgotten skill – Bob Cowley @ St Margaret's Institute
Oct 1 @ 8:00 pm – 9:15 pm
Track and Sign - the naturalist's forgotten skill - Bob Cowley @ St Margaret's Institute

The ability to accurately identify and interpret Track and Sign rests on a body of traditional knowledge that previous generations of naturalists would have regarded as fundamental. Sadly, now it is largely unknown and untaught, but with the upsurge of Citizen Science, it is perhaps more relevant than ever.

Oct
17
Thu
Conflict and Identity: Confronting the past through education @ Lincoln College
Oct 17 @ 8:30 am – Oct 18 @ 5:00 pm
Conflict and Identity: Confronting the past through education @ Lincoln College

This two-day conference will explore the evolving relationship between conflict and identity, with a specific interest in the role of history education in pre-conflict, at-conflict, and post-conflict societies. It will focus on how teachers and lecturers present history; how such choices shape identity; and how history education can be used for the purposes of promoting or undermining peaceful societies.