Sep
23
Tue
Financing Africa’s future: infrastructure, investment & opportunity
Sep 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Low investment in infrastructure is a critical constraint on economic growth in Africa. Dr Kaberuka will assess the challenges and offer his views on the way forward.

Donald Kaberuka (@DonaldKaberuka) is the President of the African Development Bank (AfDB).

Paul Collier is a director of the International Growth Centre (IGC), professor of economics and public policy at the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University and co-director of the Centre for the Study of African Economies also at Oxford University.

This public lecture is part of Growth Week 2014 which takes place at LSE from 23-25 September organised by the International Growth Centre. There will be two further public events, one of the evening of 24 September (Ten Facts about Energy and Growth), the other on the evening of 25 September (Growth, Policy and Institutions: lessons from the Indian experience).

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #GrowthWeek

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

Media queries: please contact the Press Office if you would like to request a press seat or have a media query about this event, email LSE.Press.Events@lse.ac.uk. Please note that press seats are usually allocated at least 24 hours before each event.

South Africa’s Democracy – Mandela’s “Cherished Ideal”
Sep 23 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

Moeletsi Mbeki, political analyst, author and entrepreneur, will examine how close his country has come, in the two decades since its first free elections, to the “cherished ideal” of democracy envisaged by President Mandela and those, like Mr Mbeki’s father, who were jailed for life alongside him.

Moeletsi Mbeki is the author of Architects of Poverty: Why African Capitalism Needs Changing. He recently edited Advocates for Change: How to Overcome Africa’s Challenges. Both books have been translated into Chinese. He is Deputy Chairman of the South African Institute for International Affairs.

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #LSESA

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

Media queries: please contact the Press Office if you would like to request a press seat or have a media query about this event, email LSE.Press.Events@lse.ac.uk. Please note that press seats are usually allocated at least 24 hours before each event.

From cowardice to shellshock: medicine, psychiatry & the Great War
Sep 23 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Royal_Irish_Rifles_ration_party_Somme_July_1916World War I drove great advances in science and technology, but less known is the influence on medicine. Emily Mayhew will tell the story of the stretcher bearers of WW1 who were at the heart of this revolution. Then, Louis and Marc-Antoine Crocq will explore the evolution of the diagnostics and treatment of ’war neurosis’.

Women and War
Sep 23 @ 7:00 pm
Women and War @ National Liberal Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Elisa Segrave and Virginia Nicholson in discussion, chaired by Anne Sebba

During the two word wars, women of all classes worked who had never worked before entered the workforce for the first time, in many cases doing jobs hitherto done only by men. Young women who had been in domestic service left it, never to return, to do jobs in munitions factories, shops, as car mechanics, land girls, as drivers and also, in ENSA, entertaining the troops.

As a social historian, Virginia Nicholson has explored the impact of both wars on women’s lives. The slaughter of the First World War left a generation of two million ‘surplus women’ who had to reinvent themselves, economically and emotionally. The Second World War demonstrated that women of all ages – in the services and on the Home Front – were cleverer, more broad-minded and more complex that even they themselves had guessed.

Elisa Segrave focuses on her mother Anne’s war diaries, in which she found a very different person from the needy and helpless one she had known: a competent and responsible woman of whom she could be proud, who had worked in intelligence and at Bletchley Park. After she was demobbed in 1945, however, she never worked again – something that her diaries make clear she regretted.

The authors will discuss writing about women and war, and how being in two world wars radically affected women’s lives, often changing them irrevocably. The discussion will be chaired by Anne Sebba.

Sep
24
Wed
Curator’s Choice: Poussin
Sep 24 @ 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Lunchtime talks

Focus in on one painting with our talks in the Gallery, or explore wider themes in the collection at our in-depth theatre talks.

The Sun, our Nearest Star
Sep 24 @ 1:00 pm

speaker_carolincrawfordWithout our Sun, there would be no heat, no light and no life on Earth. An eleven-year cycle of magnetic activity modulates its appearance, and the occurrence of eruptive events such as flares and coronal mass ejections. I shall discuss how these, in turn, affect the Earth – and how the Sun currently does not seem to be behaving as expected.

No reservation required
You do not need to register for this free public event. It will be run on a “first come, first served” basis, so please feel free to arrive a little early to ensure that you can get a seat. Doors will be opened half an hour before the start of the event.

Psiche Hughes in Conversation
Sep 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

psiche-gennPsiche Hughes, Beryl Bainbridge’s closest friend, has been instrumental in the development of the exhibition Art & Life: The Paintings of Beryl Bainbridge. Her book Beryl Bainbridge: Artist, Writer, Friend (Thames & Hudson, 2012) introduces the reader to Bainbridge’s drawings and paintings, setting them in the context of their creator’s life. Hughes first met Bainbridge in 1963 when they were neighbours. They remained extremely close until Bainbridge’s death in 2010. In 2003 Beryl told the Guardian: ‘In 1965 having left my home town of Liverpool, and living in a top-floor Hampstead flat, I gave birth to a daughter, expelled in a thunder storm but with nothing suitable in which to wash her, until Philip and Psiche Hughes in the ground floor flat came up trumps and loaned their chicken casserole dish.’

After talking about her book and sharing her extensive knowledge of Bainbridge’s life and work, Hughes will be available to chat and offer further insights whilst guests look around the exhibition.

Psiche Hughes is a former lecturer in Latin American and comparative literature at the University of London. She has published several translations of prose and poetry.

The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain
Sep 24 @ 6:00 pm

speaker_roderickfloud02The fourth edition of The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Britain, edited by Sir Roderick Floud, Professor Jane Humphries and Professor Paul Johnson, has involved many leading economic historians in the UK, Europe and the USA, incorporating much new research.

The new edition will be launched at Gresham College, beginning with a short lecture by Sir Andrew Dilnot, followed up by two presentations by other authors (one from Vol. 1 covering 1700-1870 and one from Vol. 2 covering 1870-2010).

Followed by a drinks reception ending at 8pm, supported by the publishers, Cambridge University Press.

No reservation required

You do not need to register for this free public event. It will be run on a “first come, first served” basis, so please feel free to arrive a little early to ensure that you can get a seat. Doors will be opened half an hour before the start of the event.

Art in the age of perfect replication w/ @felixsalmon @izakaminska
Sep 24 @ 7:00 pm
The End of Authenticity— A discussion about art and...

What happens to notions of originality and uniqueness in artworks, as the advance of 3D printing brings us closer to an era of perfect replication? Will scarcity lose its salience? What has been the experience to date in digital art, where perfect reproduction is already possible? Does the blockchain technology used for Bitcoin provide a model for authenticating digital products?

To discuss these questions The Browser is proud to bring together two of our favourite writers, Felix Salmon and Izabella Kaminska, brilliant and unconventional thinkers fascinated by the interaction of finance, technology and culture. The discussion will last about an hour, followed by a free glass of wine (or two, or even three if you catch us at the right moment). Knowledge is pleasure.

With Felix Salmon (Fusion, ex-Reuters) and Izabella Kaminska (FT Alphaville)

From Al Qaeda to ISIS: Terrorists Tactics w/ @PeterRNeumann
Sep 24 @ 7:00 pm

xIraq-ISIS.jpg.pagespeed.ic.NBEJsRPNM6Thirteen years on from the 9/11 terrorist attack on the US by Al Qaeda, how has the organisation evolved around the world and what are its links with developing groups such a ISIS and al-Shabaab?

With sophisticated social media strategies and professional promotional videos, we will be looking at the tactics being deployed, both on the ground and online, and how they differ from what we have seen from Al Qaeda.

A panel of experts will be joining us to examine the tactics and strategies these affiliated groups have developed and what is being done to combat them.

The panel:

Peter Neumann is professor of security studies at the department of war studies, King’s College London, and serves as director of the International Centre for the Study of Radicalisation (ICSR), which he founded in early 2008.

Additional speakers to be confirmed.

Introduction to The Three Principles (with guest speaker Lila Turner)
Sep 24 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

During these introductory talks we share a new understanding of how we function psychologically and discuss the three fundamental principles that redefine human experience.

Understanding these help us to achieve more clarity, creativity, success, peace of mind and overall well-being without having ‘to do’ or ‘practice’ anything.

Ten Facts about Energy and Growth
Sep 24 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Economic growth depends critically on access to reliable energy. However, in much of the world, connectivity remains low, supply in connected areas is unreliable, and, at the same time, pollution and carbon emissions are on the rise. Professor Greenstone will explore some of the key trends that are shaping energy in the developing world and outline some solutions to their energy challenges.

Michael Greenstone is a Research Programme Director (Energy) at the International Growth Centre (IGC), the Milton Friedman Professor of Economics in the department of economics at the University of Chicago and director of the Energy Policy Institute at Chicago (EPIC).

This public lecture is part of Growth Week 2014 which takes place at LSE from 23-25 September organised by the International Growth Centre. There will be two further public events, one of the evening of 23 September (Financing Africa’s future: infrastructure, investment and opportunity), the other on the evening of 25 September (Growth, Policy and Institutions: lessons from the Indian experience).

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #GrowthWeek

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

Sep
25
Thu
Inequality and the 1% with @dannydorling
Sep 25 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

baby-with-rattleInequality in the UK is increasing. More and more people are being driven towards the poverty line, and this has deep cultural and social impacts.

Even before birth, being born outside the 1% will have dramatic effect on the rest of your life: reducing life expectancy, educational and work prospects, as well as mental health.

Leading social geographer Danny Dorling visits the RSA to unpack the latest research into how the lives and ideas of the 1 percent impact the remaining 99%, revealing that inequality is about much more than just economics.

Speaker: Danny Dorling, professor of geography, University of Oxford.

Growth, Policy and Institutions: lessons from the Indian experience
Sep 25 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

India has achieved remarkable progress over the last two decades, a process in which state institutions and reform has had a crucial role. Dr Ahluwalia will reflect on the Indian growth experience to distil his key lessons for growth and development.

Montek Singh Ahluwalia is the former Deputy Chairman of the Planning Commission of the Republic of India.

Tim Besley is a member of the International Growth Centre (IGC) steering group and School Professor of Economics and Political Science, LSE.

This public lecture is part of Growth Week 2014 which takes place at LSE from 23-25 September organised by the International Growth Centre. There will be two further public events, one of the evening of 23 September (Financing Africa’s future: infrastructure, investment and opportunity), the other on the evening of 24 September (Ten Facts about Energy and Growth).

Suggested hashtag for this event for Twitter users: #GrowthWeek

This event is free and open to all with no ticket or pre-registration required. Entry is on a first come, first served basis.

Media queries: please contact the Press Office if you would like to request a press seat or have a media query about this event, email LSE.Press.Events@lse.ac.uk. Please note that press seats are usually allocated at least 24 hours before each event.

Longitude: back and forth across the years
Sep 25 @ 6:30 pm – 7:30 pm

Harrison's H4 ClockThe search for an accurate measurement of longitude is a fascinating story that transformed seafaring navigation forever. Many designs were submitted after the passing of the Longitude Act in 1714. Two complimentary methods were developed that, ultimately, allowed the widespread adoption of the marine chronometer.

Was parliament’s decision to offer a reward essential to these innovations? Are there lessons to be drawn about how we support science and technology?” As the Royal Museum Greenwich open their exhibition Ships, Clocks & Stars about the quest for longitude, exhibition curator Rebekah Higgitt and Astronomer Royal Lord Martin Rees explore these and other questions whilst discussing the impacts of the Act over the last 300 years and what the future may bring from the discoveries of NESTA’s newly launched 2014 Longitude Prize.

This event will be followed by a late opening of Ships, Clocks & Stars.

The discussion will be chaired by UK Space Agency research Fellow, Dr. Lewis Dartnell.

Public event with Lord Martin Rees FRS and Rebekah Higgitt

Representing History
Sep 25 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

drjohnsoncat-gennBainbridge’s later work often focuses on the representation of historical events and figures. The sinking of the Titanic, Captain Scott’s failed mission to Antarctica and Dr Samuel Johnson are among the people and moments from the past that populate her pages and canvases. Bainbridge’s work invites us to ask: what is at stake in a fictional representation of history? A panel of Sarah Dunant, Louisa Young, Diana Wallace, Huw Marsh and Katharine Harris will consider the question.

Sarah Dunant is the author of a number of bestselling historical novels about Renaissance Italy. Her most recent novel Blood and Beauty (2013) focuses on the fifteenth century Borgia family. Sarah also teaches renaissance studies at Washington University in St Louis. She lives in London and Florence.

Louisa Young’s novel My Dear I Wanted to Tell You (2011), a historical novel set during the First World War, has been chosen as the London Cityread for 2014. Louisa studied history at Cambridge. Her published work includes short-stories, history, biography and historical fiction. Her book A Great Task of Happiness (1995) is a biography of her grandmother Kathleen Scott (wife of Captain Scott and the subject of one of Bainbridge’s paintings).

Professor Diana Wallace’s research focuses mainly on women’s writing, with a special interest in historical fiction. She is the author of The Woman’s Historical Novel: British Women Writers, 1900–2000 (2005) which includes explorations of Bainbridge’s historical works.

Katharine Harris is currently researching historical fiction at the University of Sussex. Her research focuses on the marginalisation of certain social groups from canonical historical narrative and the response to this in twenty-first century historical fiction.

Dr Huw Marsh teaches at Queen Mary University of London and is the author of Beryl Bainbridge (2014), forthcoming in the Northcote House series Writers and their Work. His research focuses mainly on post-war and contemporary fiction, with particular interests in the historical novel, gender, comedy, and the construction of the contemporary canon. He is currently working on a study of comedy in the contemporary British novel.

An evening with Peter Thiel
Sep 25 @ 7:00 pm

thielpeter1071webJoin Peter Thiel, technology entrepreneur and co-founder of PayPal, for a thought-provoking evening as he imparts lessons from his new book Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future. In conjunction with Wired magazine, Peter will discuss the contrarian and often overlooked principles that are fundamental to building valuable companies and doing new things in business.

Peter was one of first investors and directors at Facebook, and has provided early funding for LinkedIn, Yelp, and dozens of other successful technology startups, many run by former colleagues who have been dubbed the ‘PayPal Mafia’. He has been named The Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum and one of the 25 most influential people on the Web by BusinessWeek, both affirming his status as Silicon Valley icon.

Interpreting the Unusual with @PaoloViscardi
Sep 25 @ 7:45 pm

fortean talk paoloFrom aliens and monsters to ghostly paintings, we interpret the unusual in our world according to what we find familiar in our culture. Explore some examples and explanations of the weird and wonderful that may say more about our society and our brains than about the supernatural.

Paolo is a natural history curator at the fantastic Horniman Museum, responsible for the fossil and bone collections. There may well be bones.

Sep
26
Fri
How to Build the Future with Peter Thiel
Sep 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

Peter ThielIt’s easier to copy a model than to make something new. Adding more of something familiar takes the world from 1 to n. But every time we create something new, we go from 0 to 1. Today our challenge is to imagine and create new technologies to make the future more peaceful and prosperous.

Peter Thiel (@peterthiel), an entrepreneur and investor, co-founded PayPal and the data analytics firm Palantir Technologies. He made the first outside investment in Facebook, funded companies like SpaceX and LinkedIn, and started the Thiel Foundation, which nurtures tomorrow’s tech visionaries through programs such as the Thiel Fellowship and Breakout Labs.

This event marks the publication of Peter’s new book Zero to One: Notes on Start Ups, or How to Build the Future (@zerotoonebook).

Members of the public, LSE alumni, LSE students and LSE staff can request one ticket via the online ticket request form which will be live here from around 6pm on Thursday 18 September until at least 12noon on Friday 19 September. If at 12noon we have received more requests than there are tickets available, the line will be closed, and tickets will be allocated on a random basis to those requests received. If we have received fewer requests than tickets available, the ticket line will stay open until all tickets have been allocated.

A Skeptic’s Guide to Ghost Hunting w/ @Hayleystevens
Sep 26 @ 7:30 pm
A Skeptic's Guide to Ghost Hunting w/ @Hayleystevens @ Star and Garter | London | United Kingdom

‘A Skeptic’s Guide to Ghost Hunting’ will offer some unique insight into modern paranormal research. Hayley Stevens will introduce you to the bizarre world of modern ghost-hunting, explain how to spot sham ghost-hunting claims, and how all is not what is seems when it comes to things that go bump in the night…

Described as ‘ … the Scully end of the Mulder-Scully X-Files spectrum’ by The Times, Hayley Stevens is one of the UK’s most vocal skeptical paranormal researchers and has been investigating ghost cases for over a decade, ever since she was a teenager. Her writing can be found in Skeptical Inquirer, The Skeptic, Paranormal Magazine and more and she regularly speaks across Europe about investigating the paranormal as a non-believer.

Mysteries of matter at the LHC
Sep 26 @ 7:50 pm – 9:15 pm

ATLAS event CREDIT ATLAS collaboration CERNTwo years ago, the Higgs Boson was discovered by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. But how precisely does it fill its role as the last missing piece in the Standard Model of particle physics?
The Large Hadron Collider will restart in 2015 with almost double the collision energy to test just that. But even then, this theory only accounts for 5% of the Universe, and does not include gravity.

Can the LHC shed light on the origin of dark matter? Why is gravity so much weaker than the other forces? Dr Pippa Wells will explain how the LHC will explore these mysteries of matter.

Sep
27
Sat
Egyptian priests & priestesses of the last thousand years BC
Sep 27 @ 1:15 pm – 2:00 pm

A Gallery Talk.

Sep
29
Mon
Curators’ Choice: After Michelangelo
Sep 29 @ 1:00 pm – 1:30 pm

Lunchtime talks

Focus in on one painting with our talks in the Gallery, or explore wider themes in the collection at our in-depth theatre talks.

Sleepwalkers: How Europe Went to War in 1914
Sep 29 @ 6:00 pm

christopherclarkThis lecture explores new ways of understanding the crisis that brought war to Europe in the summer of 1914; reflects on some of the problems of interpretation that have dogged the debate over the war’s origins; and considers the contemporary resonance of a catastrophe that is now nearly a century old.

No reservation required
You do not need to register for this free public event. It will be run on a “first come, first served” basis, so please feel free to arrive a little early to ensure that you can get a seat. Doors will be opened half an hour before the start of the event.

What causes psychosis? w/ @Dr_JB_Kirkbride
Sep 29 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

psychosis-sitecorePsychosis is a broad and complex set of mental disorders, characterised by a loss of contact with reality. Ranging from short term hallucinations to severely disruptive disorders like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, the symptoms are wide-ranging and diverse. But how does our external environment affect the risk of experiencing a psychotic episode? And how can we study this within a population?

Dr James Kirkbride’s research seeks to answer these often complex and enigmatic questions. Join him for a discussion of the techniques that are helping to shape our understanding of psychosis and mental illness.

Dr James Kirkbride is a Sir Henry Dale Fellow based in the Division of Psychiatry at University College London.

Attending this event

This event is free to attend and open to all. No tickets are required. Doors open at 6pm and seats will be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis.

If you require British Sign Language (BSL) interpretation please contact the events team no later than 2 weeks prior to the event and we would be happy to arrange an interpreter.

Recorded audio of this event will be available on this page a few days afterwards.

Shelf Help: Julian Barnes in conversation with Hermione Lee
Sep 29 @ 8:00 pm

combowebIn a rare public appearance, Julian Barnes talks to Hermione Lee, Penelope Fitzgerald’s biographer, about the fear of death, not believing but missing god, nature and nurture.

julianbarnes.com | hermionelee.com

Sep
30
Tue
Science, society and the Royal Institution
Sep 30 @ 12:00 pm – 12:45 pm

Faraday Christmas Lectures 1855At a time of revolutionary politics and global conflict, the Royal Institution was set up as a site for communicating scientific knowledge to an aristocratic and upper class audience. Join Professor Frank James for this free illustrated talk in which he will discuss its origins and what has changed since.

Ming garden culture and its legacy
Sep 30 @ 1:15 pm – 2:00 pm

A gallery talk by Jan Stuart, British Museum.

U3A at the Ri w/ @RotwangsRobot @EssiViding @zoelaughlin
Sep 30 @ 3:00 pm – 6:00 pm

persian_ceiling_credit_fotopedia_1_2110a203685001aeThe University of the Third Age teams up with the Ri for an afternoon of fascinating science talks. Chemist Kathryn Harkup will look at poisons, Zoe Laughlin will investigate the world of materials and psychologist Essi Viding will delve into the mind of psychopaths.

About the speakers

Kathryn Harkup is a trained chemist who has turned her hand to science communication, delivering talks and workshops on the quirky side of science.

Essi Viding is Professor of Developmental Psychopathy at UCL, using cognitive experiments, brain imaging, and genotyping to study persistent antisocial behaviour.

Zoe Laughlin is co-founder/director of the Institute of Making and works on the interface of science, art, craft and design of materials. She does formal experiments with matter, materials consultancy and large-scale public exhibitions and events.

The Floating State
Sep 30 @ 5:30 pm – 6:30 pm

The floating state: Trade embargoes & the rise of the fiscal state (Venice)

After the fall of Acre in 1291 a phase in the history of Crusades came to a close while a series of trade embargoes and maritime crusading projects sought to continue and revive crusade in the Eastern Mediterranean. While these endeavours naturally clashed with Venetian interests in the transcontinental spice trade, the papacy enforced them rather rigorously, at least in Venice. The pope’s heavy-handed approach was thereby, perhaps, not only motivated by a genuine interest in the liberation of the Holy Sepulchre but also by more profane territorial claims on Ferrara, which had come under Venetian domination.

Venice was forced to comply – to an extent – with the embargoes and had to broker arrangements to continue Levant trade with papal blessing. This paper will focus on one element of this compromise in trade matters; the Venetian trade embargo of Ferrara compensating for the cessation of overlordship and in the context of the Serenissima’s wider attempts to control trade in the upper Adriatic.

This seminar will look at the complex relationship of military might and fiscal exploitation through the lens of Venetian embargo policies and the rise of the Venetian coast guard/’standing navy’ as a crucial element of Venetian statehood which was not only, but also, sea-born and sea-borne as the myth of Venice indeed maintained, although expressed in a different way.

Georg Christ received his PhD in Medieval History from the University of Basel in 2006 and afterwards completed a tour as UN military observer and deputy chief of a mission analysis centre in the Middle East. He has taught Late Medieval and Early Modern History at the University of Manchester since 2012. A specialist in the late medieval history of the Eastern Mediterranean, his recent publications include ‘The Venetian Consul and the Cosmopolitan Mercantile Community of Alexandria at the Beginning of the 15th century’, Al-Masaq: Studia Arabo-Islamica Mediterranea 26, no. 1 (April 2014) 62-77; ‘Did Greek wine become Port? Or why institutional interventions matter (c. 1350-1780)’, Quaderni Storici 143, no. 48, 2 (Aug 2013) 333-358; Trading Conflicts. Venetian Merchants and Mamluk Officials in Late Medieval Alexandria (Leiden: Brill, 2012), and ‘Eine Stadt wandert aus. Kollaps und Kontinuität im spätmittelalterlichen Alexandria’, Viator 42 (2011) 145-168. His current research focuses on trade embargoes in the Eastern Mediterranean and the realm of the Hansa in the 14th century, the Venetian diasporas in the Mamluk Empire, and the history of knowledge management.