Apr
26
Thu
The Child in the Family Court Room by Jo Delahunty QC (@JoDQC)
Apr 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Child in the Family Court Room by Jo Delahunty QC (@JoDQC) @ Barnard's Inn Hall | England | United Kingdom

What role do children play in the family trial? The case concerns their future: how is their voice heard? What happens if they hold the key to the issues before the court? Should they give evidence, hear evidence? Should they meet the judge deciding their futures? How does the court reduce the risk that the trial experience itself harms the child it is seeking to protect? In this lecture Jo Delahunty QC will explore whether the family court system is fit for purpose when it comes to dealing with the children at the heart of its deliberations.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Apr
27
Fri
Lost Lectures – BARN AGAIN
Apr 27 @ 7:00 pm – Apr 28 @ 2:00 am
Lost Lectures - BARN AGAIN

On Friday 27th April we welcome you to the great barn, in the heart of central London, where you’ll be treated to an mesmeric mix of world-class talks and performances, enjoyed from the comfort of your very own hay bale.

There will be an array of foody and drinky delights available throughout the evening. The night will end with a raucous hoe down, led by the finest musicians in the business, so bring your dancing shoes and join us for a long-overdue roll in the hay!

Barn doors open at 7pm * please swing them closed again on your way out.

Talks begin promptly at 7.30 and end around 10.30, music and dancing will continue through to the early hours (2am).

Tickets are priced at £30 each and can be found right here.

Speakers will be announced in the coming weeks, we can’t wait to share them with you.

Location will be revealed only to ticket holders a few days before the event.

See you soon Lostlings…

Lost Folk

The Modern Alice in Japan
Apr 27 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
The Modern Alice in Japan @ Art Workers Guild | England | United Kingdom

An exploration of Japanese adaptions of the Alice books -from the beautifully illustrated work of artist Kusama Yayoi to comics, film, animation, stationery and clothes.

Amanda Kennell is a scholar of modern Japanese literature and visual media. Her dissertation traced Japan’s reception of Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland novels from their arrival in 1899 until today through adaptations in a variety of media.

Apr
29
Sun
Wellcome Book Prize Special – 5×15
Apr 29 @ 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

On the eve of the prize announcement, the finalists of the Wellcome Book Prize 2018 gather to present their work in a spirit of friendly competition. Come listen and decide who to your mind should win the coveted prize!

Featuring: Sigrid Rausing on her memoir of loss and addiction, Lyndsey Fitzharris on her history of surgery ‘The Butchering Art’, Ayobami Adebayo on fertility, Kathryn Mannix on palliative care and Meredith Wadman on combatting killer viruses. Also shortlisted is Mark O’Connell for To Be A Machine.

The Wellcome Book Prize is awarded annually to celebrate the many ways in which literature can illuminate the breadth and depth of our relationship with health, medicine and illness.

Apr
30
Mon
What Really Happened at the First Moving-Picture Shows by Ian Christie (@ianchris)
Apr 30 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
What Really Happened at the First Moving-Picture Shows by Ian Christie (@ianchris) @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

The reception of moving pictures in 1894–96 has been much mythologised. Were spectators really frightened of an approaching train? Did they imagine seeing their departed relatives reanimated on screen? How much attention was actually paid to this new phenomenon among so many contemporary novelties and wonders? Moving pictures may not have been the innovation once claimed, but within a decade few could doubt that they had become a major force in changing the Edwardian world.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Myths of Life and the Afterlife in Plato’s dialogues: The Republic
Apr 30 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

The third of three Monday evening sessions on the theme of “Myths of Life and the Afterlife” tonight we look at the myth of Er which Plato presents us with in the last few pages of the Republic.

For the Platonic tradition, the soul is the self that makes choices, thinks, experiences, and directs the life we live: in the ‘myth of Er’ given at the end of the Republic, not only is the soul depicted as undergoing judgement and receiving due reward for the life it has led on Earth but also as making a choice of its next life before the throne of Necessity and the Fates. This, says, Socrates is why we must learn how to choose the right kind of life both here and in the next world – a good life being that which leads us to being just, and a bad life being one that commits us to injustice. We’ll look at the myth and consider the complex psychology enshrined in it. The Platonic tradition rests upon the affirmation that we are largely self-constituted creatures whose central task is to shape ourselves through a philosophical life.

If you missed our two previous sessions, don’t worry each evening is self-contained.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

May
1
Tue
The Cult of Celebrity (2/8) The Rise of the Divine Michelangelo
May 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Cult of Celebrity (2/8) The Rise of the Divine Michelangelo @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers exciting and innovative lectures in Art History, Literature, Opera and Music.

This course will explore the rise of celebrity in the art world and how this change in status not only affected the output of artists but also their lives and in some cases the individuals depicted by them. It will show that the impact of these changes is still with us and continues to govern the way we appreciate and value art. We will start by looking at very early un-autographed works before moving on to look at iconic artists such as Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Vermeer and others. The themes will be the rise of the signature work, the rise of the individual and thus creation of the idea of the artist, fame, adulation, riches and the celebrity endorsement.

The Rise of the Divine Michelangelo, Fame within his own Lifetime

Why did Michelangelo actively pursue fame and celebrity and how did he do it? We will see how he used his earliest pieces and celebrity endorsements to promote himself and his art. These aspects will be explored through some of his most iconic works placing them in their historical, social and political context.

In Search of the Medieval Outlaw: The Tales of Robin Hood by Professor Stephen Church (@SD_Church)
May 1 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
In Search of the Medieval Outlaw: The Tales of Robin Hood by Professor Stephen Church (@SD_Church) @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

The rulers of the medieval English kingdom discouraged resistance to authority by the widespread use of execution, outlawry, and exile. Yet medieval English society also applauded such resistance. Encapsulated in the tales of Robin Hood, the good outlaw is loyal, courageous, and clever; while the authorities he outwits are disloyal, cowardly, and stupid, using the cover of the law to behave corruptly. Examination of the outlaw in medieval literature tells us much about the mentality of the medieval English mind.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Risk over Risk plus Reward w/@jamesvogl
May 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Risk over Risk plus Reward w/@jamesvogl @ Mortimer House | England | United Kingdom

Cerebral Gym founder James Vogl will be leading an interactive, scenario-led class on how to approach every day problems using game theoretical, probabilistic and strategic underpinnings.

Currently writing a book called “Risk Over Risk Plus Reward”, James will share insight and analytical skills gained as a professional poker player and hedge fund market speculator, such as dealing with extreme pressure situations and knowing when to hold ‘em and when to fold ‘em.

About James

James Vogl, 37, is a former professional backgammon and poker player. He won a World Series of Poker bracelet at the age of 23 in 2004.

He went on to trade equities and credit at Goldman Sachs, before becoming a proprietary trader at Manro-Haydan commodities, then joining Moore Capital as a macro portfolio manager. He left to become a partner of Graham Capital LLP in May 2012 where he had sole responsibility running an over a billion-dollar portfolio.

In September 2017 he left to set-up Cerebral Gym full-time, an idea he first conceived of six years ago when he challenged his gym personal trainer to become conversational in Mandarin, rather than complete an iron-man the following year. James was delighted to lose the bet.

Timings

You are welcome to arrive from 6.30pm for drinks and mingling beforehand.
The class will be hosted from 7pm – 8.15pm, after which guests can stay on in the bar or move down to Mortimer House’s restaurant for a late bite.

May
2
Wed
Exhilarating Places 2/10 (Utopia)
May 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Exhilarating Places 2/10 (Utopia) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

How can we know, before we ever go there, that a new place will exhilarate us? Painting, photography, fiction, travel-writing, and poetry can put us on the plane with expectations, and pictures in our minds, and of course we then match what they promise against the realities that await us. Afterwards, art and writing intensify what we found, show us sights we missed, clothing our memories of them in the aura of legend as they had our hopes, so we may wonder if they exist when we are not there. Exhilarating Places visits charismatic cultural centres of our world and others we have dreamed of and invented. They catch our eye and instantly deliver both real and imagined destinations in great art and writing.

Utopia

“A map of the world which does not include Utopia is not even worth glancing at,” wrote Oscar Wilde in 1891. Utopia is gifted a geography by More, Campanella, China’s Peach Blossom Spring writers, Swift, Butler, Thoreau, Morris, Lawrence, Woolf, Wells, and is found in a landscape by Qiu Ying, Raphael, Lorrain, A. Lorenzetti, Piero, Brueghel, Capability Brown, German and Russian avant-gardes, Degas, Pissarro, Signac, Ruskin, Kandinsky, Corbusier, Fuller, Crane, Magritte and F M Brown.

Karl Marx – 200 Years On by Professor Gareth Stedman Jones
May 2 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Karl Marx – 200 Years On by Professor Gareth Stedman Jones @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

To mark the 200th anniversary of the birth of Karl Marx (5 May 1818) and 150 years since Das Kapital was published in 1867, the lecture will explore the possible affinity between Marx’s work in human history and Darwin’s in natural history. Enthusiasm for Darwin was shared by successive generations of Communists but Marx’s conception of a ‘natural human being’ was different. In the new political and intellectual climate, Marx viewed competition as a product, not of ‘the struggle for existence’, but of private property and commercial society.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Serial Killers w/@JenniferRees88
May 2 @ 7:30 pm

What differentiates a Serial Killer from Mass or Spree Killers? During this talk, you will discover how Serial Killers are classified, using case studies to illustrate, whilst debunking common serial killer myths along the way.

We will also explore how common homicidal fantasies are. Have you ever fantasised about killing someone? Jennifer will explore the research into the phenomenon.

Difference between male and female serial killers? What is the psychology underpinning the relationships of Killer Couples, exploring issues such as folie à deux (madness of two) and Hybristophilia – why do serial killers gain admirers, fan mail, and even spouses in light of their atrocious crimes?

This talk will be evidence-based throughout, citing the current research from the field in an accessible way.

Jennifer Rees is a Forensic Science Lecturer at West Herts College and the Programme Manager of the Extended Degree in Science Programme for the University of Hertfordshire’s Consortium. Previously, she has trained Policing recruits teaching on the Certificate in Knowledge of Policing (CKP) programme, on topics such as interviewing, as well as dealing with suspects, witnesses and victims.

In 2016, she was one of 50 Healthcare Professionals selected to write a Whitepaper recommendation for the NHS, and was appointed the Vice Chair of the Mental Wealth Initiative, a sub-committee of the Youth Health Parliament. Their proposals were presented in Parliament in December 2016, aimed to improve provision for ‘mid-level’ mental health problems.

May
5
Sat
Let my people go: Theologies of Liberation w/@AnthonyGReddie
May 5 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Let my people go: Theologies of Liberation w/@AnthonyGReddie @ St Paul's Cathedral | England | United Kingdom

Originating in the experience of life in South American and African countries, they ask searching questions about the nature of God’s liberating love and our responsibility and relationship to each other. Considered controversial because they advocate a preferential option for the marginalised and oppressed, what can they teach us about how to live in God’s light as 21st century Christians? In this participative study afternoon, we will explore how the church can be a place of liberation, and how we as individuals can be allies and agents of change.

Professor Anthony Reddie is a Learning and Development Officer for the Methodist Church and Professor Extraordinarius in Theological Ethics at the University of South Africa. He is the author of numerous books, including Black Theology (SCM Press) and Nobodies to Somebodies: A Practical Theology for Education and Liberation (Epworth Press).

May
8
Tue
The Cult of Celebrity 3/8 (From Unknown to Fame, Infamy and Ridicule)
May 8 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Cult of Celebrity 3/8 (From Unknown to Fame, Infamy and Ridicule) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers exciting and innovative lectures in Art History, Literature, Opera and Music.

This course will explore the rise of celebrity in the art world and how this change in status not only affected the output of artists but also their lives and in some cases the individuals depicted by them. It will show that the impact of these changes is still with us and continues to govern the way we appreciate and value art. We will start by looking at very early un-autographed works before moving on to look at iconic artists such as Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Rembrandt, Vermeer and others. The themes will be the rise of the signature work, the rise of the individual and thus creation of the idea of the artist, fame, adulation, riches and the celebrity endorsement.

From Unknown to Fame, to Infamy and Ridicule, Caravaggio and Bernini

Two of the most seminal artists of the Baroque period – Bernini and Caravaggio – will be contrasted in this lecture. Both rose to fame during their lifetimes but their reputations crashed and burned during those lifetimes. How did they rise so rapidly and how did they descend equally rapidly? What can this tell us about the nature of fame and celebrity? We will look at the motivation of their patrons as well as those of the artists and consider how these aspects affected their works.

Facts Matter, But They Aren’t Enough: Science, Faith and Meaning in Life w/@alisteremcgrath
May 8 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Facts Matter, But They Aren’t Enough: Science, Faith and Meaning in Life w/@alisteremcgrath @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

In our post-truth age, facts often don’t seem to meet the deepest human longings. So do we need to go against facts, or beyond them? What does the relatively new discipline of the cognitive science of religion, which suggests that human beings are naturally religious, have to say about our human future? And where does this instinct come from? Recent psychological research has looked at the importance of meaning to human beings, and how this works out in core questions about the relation of science and faith.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Lost in Time and Space: Unrolling Egypt’s Ancient Dead
May 8 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm

[Image: One of a series of eight drawings of Egyptian mummies, by William Home Clift, 1821. (c) the Royal College of Surgeons]

The frequent souvenir of wealthy travellers, the mummified cadavers of ancient Egyptians were not confined merely to museums but became an increasingly popular feature of salons and lecture theatres throughout London and, indeed, the Western world during the mid-nineteenth century.
The practice of publicly ‘unrolling’ mummies has been viewed as both a ghoulish spectacle for affluent sensation seekers and as an early scientific approach to the emerging discipline of Egyptology.
This lecture places the practice within its social, cultural, and historical contexts, as a fascinating example of forgotten London.

Speaker: John J. Johnston

This lecture is a joint event between the Royal College of Surgeons and the London Metropolitan Archives

FREE – Booking Essential via LMA Eventbrite page.

Shakespeare’s Fame by Sir Jonathan Bate (@provbate)
May 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Shakespeare’s Fame by Sir Jonathan Bate (@provbate) @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Ever since classical antiquity, poets and playwrights have written about famous heroes and anti-heroes, lovers and politicians. But they have also yearned for posthumous fame themselves. How do they achieve it? This final lecture will show how Shakespeare helped to immortalise the famous figures of ancient Greece and Rome, and how he in turn became famous after his death – as the classics were to Shakespeare, so Shakespeare became a classic. He is our classic.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Future crime: Detection and prevention
May 8 @ 7:00 pm – 8:15 pm
Future crime: Detection and prevention @ The Royal Institution of Great Britain | England | United Kingdom

Could AI predict a crime before it happens? Will we ever truly trust a machine? What new technology might be used against us in the future? All these questions and more will be explored by our expert panel of Gloria Laycock, founding Director of the Jill Dando institute of Crime Science at UCL, Mark Girolami, Director of the Lloyds Register Foundation – Turing Programme on Data Centric Engineering and Adrian Weller, senior research fellow in machine learning at the University of Cambridge.

May
9
Wed
The style, loves and art of Frida Kahlo
May 9 @ 9:45 am – 12:00 pm
The style, loves and art of Frida Kahlo @ Art Workers' Guild | England | United Kingdom

“Kahlo is variously enshrined in the popular imagination as a bohemian artist, a victim turned survivor, proto-feminist, sexual adventurer who challenged gender boundaries, and, with her mixed-race parentage, an embodiment of a hybrid, postcolonial world.” says the Tate.

She was also a style icon in the Americas, and had intense love affairs with Diego Rivera, Leon Trotsky, and painter Jacqueline Lamba (wife and muse of Surrealism founder André Breton).

With such a powerful cult of personality, no wonder Kahlo’s art has been eclipsed since her death in 1954. But she did produce over 200 works and is now revered by artists as diverse as Cindy Sherman, Kiki Smith and Madonna. Join us in May as art historian and writer Dr Marie-Anne Mancio explores the style, loves and art of the ‘Frida Phenomenon’.

Morning event with coffee and pastries.

Exhilarating Places 3/10 (St Petersburg)
May 9 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Exhilarating Places 3/10 (St Petersburg) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers exciting and innovative lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

How can we know, before we ever go there, that a new place will exhilarate us? Painting, photography, fiction, travel-writing, and poetry can put us on the plane with expectations, and pictures in our minds, and of course we then match what they promise against the realities that await us. Afterwards, art and writing intensify what we found, show us sights we missed, clothing our memories of them in the aura of legend as they had our hopes, so we may wonder if they exist when we are not there. Exhilarating Places visits charismatic cultural centres of our world and others we have dreamed of and invented. They catch our eye and instantly deliver both real and imagined destinations in great art and writing.

St. Petersburg

Pushkin’s dramatic poem, ‘The Bronze Horseman’, is a key witness, flanked by Dostoyevsky’s Raskolnikov, the stories of Gogol and Turgenev, poems by Blok, Akhmatova and Mandelstam, and the wordless brilliance of Alexeyev, Bakst, Brodsky, Collmann, Falconet, Franz, Nikolai Ge, Lanceray, Repin, Serov, Surikov, Vasilyev, Vasnetov, and epic metropolitan architecture, all of them testifying to Peter the Great’s delusions of grandeur in recklessly building this city on the sea.

Speechwriting: Creating Authenticity by Simon Lancaster @bespokespeeches
May 9 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Speechwriting: Creating Authenticity by Simon Lancaster @bespokespeeches @ Barnard's Inn Hall | England | United Kingdom

The image of the speechwriter in televised programmes (such as The Thick of It, The West Wing or Yes Minister) is assomething of a puppeteer, a sinister figure operating in the shadows, malevolently manipulating our political masters. Simon Lancaster believes that the successful speechwriter is less of a puppeteer and more of an impressionist. In his talk, he will share a number of stories and anecdotes from his time as speechwriter, setting out how he captures someone else’s authentic voice and what happens when it goes wrong.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

The Disunited States: Is the Trump Presidency causing irreparable damage to America?
May 9 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

America has never seen anything like this. Time and again, Donald Trump has attacked the very fabric of US democracy. He has called the press ‘the enemy of the American people’. He says that claims that Russia interfered in the US election are a hoax. And that the FBI – currently investigating his campaign – should be personally loyal to the president.

And it’s not just political institutions Trump is damaging, his opponents say: In America he has stoked racial tension, coddled Wall Street and given succour to the gun lobby. On the world stage, he’s alienated key allies, slapped $50 billion in tariffs on China that may spark off a trade war, and appointed the hawkish John Bolton, who has advocated regime change in Iran and North Korea, as national security adviser.

If Trump is a new kind of threat, the big question is whether the damage he is doing to America will be permanent. Will the country that survived two world wars, the Cold War and the attacks of 9/11 really be put off its stride by a reality show host who could be gone in less than three years’ time? Or is Trump dismantling the robust system that has kept America united and irreparably damaging its standing as the most powerful nation on earth?

But perhaps this is all liberal hand-wringing. Could Trump, in fact, be that rarest of things – a politician who delivers on his promises – and prove to be the reformer the American electorate voted for?

To examine the political health and standing of the United States at this crucial moment, Intelligence Squared are bringing together Ronan Farrow, journalist and former US government adviser; Mark Lilla, the American political scientist who hit the headlines last year with an article arguing that it is the left’s preoccupation with identity politics that opened the door to Trump’s victory; Lionel Shriver, award-winning novelist and commentator; and Brian Klaas, an expert on authoritarianism who claims that with every autocratic tweet Trump is edging America away from its democratic norms.

Speakers

Ronan Farrow

An investigative journalist who writes for the New Yorker and makes documentaries for HBO. He has been an anchor and reporter at MSNBC and NBC News, and his writing has appeared in publications including the Wall Street Journal and the Washington Post. He is the winner of a 2018 George Polk Award and has been nominated for the National Magazine Award, among other commendations. He is also a lawyer and former State Department official. His book War on Peace: The End of Diplomacy and the Decline of American Influence is published in April.

Brian Klaas

Fellow in Comparative Politics at the London School of Economics, where he focuses on democratisation and political violence. He is the author of The Despot’s Apprentice, in which he argues that Donald Trump poses a unique threat to to global democracy.

Mark Lilla

Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University. In a New York Times op-ed in November 2016, ‘The End of Identity Liberalism’, he argued that Trump’s victory in the presidential contest was a backlash against the American left’s obsession with identity politics. Lilla’s article was the NYT’s most read political op-ed of the year, and he has now expanded his argument into a book, The Once and Future Liberal: After Identity Politics.

Lionel Shriver

Author of twelve novels, including the bestsellers The Mandibles: A Family, 2029-2047 and the Orange-Prize winner We Need to Talk About Kevin (also a 2011 feature film). She won the 2014 BBC National Short Story Award, and her novella and story collection Property was published in spring 2018. She is a prolific journalist whose writing has appeared in the Guardian, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, amongst other publications.

Chair

Justin Webb

One of the presenters of Radio 4’s Today programme. He was the BBC’s North America Editor for 8 years, covering the 9/11 attacks and the election of President Obama.

Speakers subject to change

May
10
Thu
Entangled Lives in Georgian Portraits
May 10 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm

The Portrait of Dido Elizabeth Belle and Lady Elizabeth Murray (1770s-1780s, Scone Palace) pictures two cousins together, one Afro-Scottish and the other Scottish and Polish. Their depiction offers a contrast: Dido is shown in an exoticised fashion, whereas Lady Elizabeth is portrayed as an English rose. Dido’s mother was enslaved and her father was an officer in the Royal Navy. Their portrait was painted against the backdrop of the two major slavery cases in the eighteenth-century – the Somerset Case of 1772 and the Zong Trial of 1783-1783, both of which their guardian and great-uncle, Lord Mansfield, presided over. Dr. Jennifer Germann will address the complexity of the portrait in light of conflicted ideas about liberty and slavery across the Atlantic world.

May
13
Sun
Cerebral Gym Launch Day
May 13 @ 11:00 am – 11:00 pm
Cerebral Gym Launch Day @ House of St Barnabas | England | United Kingdom

Challenge your mind and engage with others at our launch event.

The day will showcase all of what Cerebral Gym will have to offer when we launch our first permanent full-time location next year: Hear from world class speakers, take part in classes, listen to a curated podcast whilst enjoying a massage and try something new… whether learning how to play bridge in an hour or meditating for the first time.

Meet new friends over brunch and dinner which are both included and enjoy our live show in the evening.

Format of the day

A ticket is all inclusive and will entitle you to take part in and enjoy in any/all of the following:

11am-2pm Brunch

12-8pm Talks, running in the main auditorium throughout the day

12-7pm Classes/ mediation room/ podcast/massage and chill room are running and will be repeated throughout the day in the various rooms spread over the house, so you will have an opportunity to try everything in your own time

12-9pm Games Room: take part in tournaments running throughout the day in bridge, backgammon, chess, gin rummy and connect four or just play with world class experts

7-9pm Dinner buffet served on the ground floor dining room

2pm – 11pm drinks and healthy snacks will be served at the refuel bar throughout the day

9-11pm Live show in the chapel: mentalist, live music, political stand-up comic

*Tickets are all-inclusive and allow you to come and go for any part of the day or night at your leisure.

The lineup:

We’ll be welcoming world-class speakers and teachers to engage and lead sessions. Just a few of these include:

Dominic O’Brien, 8 times World Memory Champion
Victoria Coren Mitchell, journalist and TV presenter
David Gold, England international bridge player
Paulo Pacifici, meditation pracititioner of the DeRose method
Katherine Mills, mentalist
Joumanna Bercetche, of CNBC
Emma Sinclair MBE, Unicef ambassador
Lucy Woodruff of Opera Unplugged
David Patrikarakos, author of ‘War in 140 Characters’
Visit cerebralgym.com for more information

About The House of St Barnabas

The House of St Barnabas is a private members’ club like no other. It is a charity pledging to break the cycle of homelessness and social exclusion in London through a not-for-profit members’ club, to help the people they support back into lasting paid work. Their Employment Academy offers accredited qualifications, on-site work experience, real job opportunities and mentoring. The House of St Barnabas are seeking to redefine the notion of a members’ club, to challenge stereotypes around the idea of exclusivity and to create a different kind of membership. The club is a creative, socially conscious and vibrant space.

Save Democracy – Abolish Voting
May 13 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Save Democracy – Abolish Voting @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Referendums have a popular appeal. They promise to put ordinary voters in control, and sideline the self-serving elites.

Save Democracy – Abolish Voting sets out to offer an alternative way of managing a democracy that will achieve both of these aims in much more effective, and incorruptible way. It is a proposal that takes the best aspects of representative government while also introducing a much more direct and fair link between the citizen and their own government.

It is more than just an attack on the crude binary referendums though. It takes a radical route out of the sterile debate around electoral reform, questioning everything that is popularly thought about how democratic decision-making should be done.

We have slipped into the comfortable error of confusing government by electoral politics with popular sovereignty. In a less sophisticated age, it may have been the least-worst version of democracy that was available, but in an age of sophisticated communication and feedback monitoring, this is no longer the case.

If anything, politics had gradually turned into a retardant, not an accelerant to democracy. Modern electoral systems evolved in a very uneven way in response to particular political pressures. They were rarely ever deliberately designed to apply any sophisticated democratic logic. Instead, the universal franchise often happened in some token way where, we could all join in the illusion of an equal say in our own governance.

That token is a ballot paper that gives us control over only a small part of the decision-making chain (e.g. “a parliament”, or only a part of it in the UK’s case) by choosing from a limited set of options that we think we may want – in advance.

It shares control over our government very unevenly and unfairly. If we wanted to design a system in a way that helps wealthy and charismatic people con everyone easily, we could barely design anything better.

The book, and this talk, attempts to offer a version of democracy that we would choose now if we were starting to create liberal democracy from scratch, knowing what we know about feedback loops and the democratic flaws that have grown more pronounced as electoral government has evolved.

Save Democracy – Abolish Voting is a meditation on the nature of democracy in the digital age. It concludes with a proposal – a better alternative to electoral democracy for choosing and directing our government fairly and well.

Paul Evans is a trade union official working in the TV and Motion Pictures industry.

Save Democracy – Abolish Voting, (2017) was his first book. It draws on a range of life experiences, including the creation of large-scale e-Democracy platforms and programmes, establishing a successful worker co-op software company, union organising and various consultancy roles addressing problems around democracy in the digital age.

He lives in London with a wife and two children.