Sep
23
Mon
Plato on Justice
Sep 23 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plato on Justice

A recurring theme in the dialogues of Plato is the profound relationship between the human self and justice: all ten books of the Republic are dedicated to the examination of this relationship, and although the speakers often turns aside to explore other issues, the central theme is never far away. Towards the end of the dialogue, Socrates says that the most important thing to study is the good life and that, having an eye to the nature of the self, we should comprehend “both the worse and the better life, pronouncing that to be the worse which shall lead the soul to become more unjust, and that to be the better life which shall lead it to become more just, and to dismiss every other consideration.” We notice that the point of focus here is the soul (psyche) – that invisible something that is understood to be the unific seat of selfhood, which gives life to the body, and which has the power to know and to make choices. It is on this understanding that all the important ethical principles of Platonic philosophy are based.

We’ll read an extract from the Gorgias which puts forward profoundly challenging consequences to this soul-centred view of life and its ethical dimensions, and discuss our understanding of the issues raised.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the text we will be starting with is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Sep
24
Tue
The Course/Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 1/10
Sep 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 1/10 @ The University Womens Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

 

Introduction and the Court Artist

Why the arts? What is a Prince? Were they all leaders of taste? We begin by exploring some of the key themes and figures of this series before moving on to examine the qualities, experience and identity of the “court artist”.

Sep
25
Wed
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 1/20
Sep 25 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 1/20 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera lectures.

In this series of paired lectures and walks will look at the ways in which particular groups, often professions, have shaped and been shaped by London. Each theme could provide a course of its own, so we will proceed through a series of snapshots at the activities of these groups and individuals at key moments in the formation of the city.

Lecture Immigrants

London is a city of incomers, and has been since its foundation by the Romans nearly two millennia ago. The way Londoners speak, eat, the trades they have practiced and the way they dress have been formed by the crucial additions to the population which have given the city its character.

2 October 2019
 

The week after the lecture, there will be a conducted walk in Spitalfields and nearby, home successively to Huguenots, Jews and Bangladeshis

CHILDREN OF MEN (2006) +TALK: People on the Move w/@steveballinger
Sep 25 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
CHILDREN OF MEN (2006) +TALK: People on the Move w/@steveballinger @ The Castle Cinema

In 2027, following 18 years of global human infertility, the world is a bleak and hostile place. Former activist Theo (Clive Owen) drifts through the violence-riven streets of London without hope or purpose. However, when he reluctantly agrees to help former lover Julian (Julianne Moore) smuggle a miraculously pregnant refugee out of the country, he is unwittingly thrust into the role of all that stands between the human race and its extinction. As the country descends into anarchy and the authorities close in, Theo must race against time to secure safe passage for the humanity’s only hope of salvation…

The film will be preceded by a talk from Steve Ballinger, Director of Communications at British Future – an independent thinktank and charity working on issues of integration, migration and identity – who will explore what the public really think about refugees and asylum.

Sep
26
Thu
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 1/10
Sep 26 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 1/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

Beginnings, Schooling And Influences

We will look at the unconventional circumstances surrounding the birth of Leonardo, his family background, his father’s profession and how that impacted on Leonardo’s early education. We will examine his early training in the Florentine workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio; look closely at the latter’s techniques and working practices, the students who passed through this workshop and what possible impact all this may have had on the future development of Leonardo’s art. We will end with his departure from the Verrocchio workshop.

Oct
1
Tue
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 2/10
Oct 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 2/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

The Glory of the Lagoon

Far from the romantic city of our imagination, Renaissance Venice was a superpower feared across the Italian peninsula. Its vast territories gave it unique contact with eastern and western culture which, from Jacopo Bellini to Titian, mingle in the art commissioned by those selected families who vied with each other to provide the next Doge.

Oct
2
Wed
Climate science in the Age of Unreason
Oct 2 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Climate Scientist Dr Ben McNeil, from the University of New South Wales, discusses misinformation and how to tackle it in the click-bait driven environment of social media and weaponised mistrust.

With a group of medical researchers and journalists, Ben set out to tackle the spread of online misinformation by founding Metafact.io in 2018. In this month’s talk, Ben discusses the important background issues and explains the evolution of Metafact as a source of evidence-based information to help individuals and societies in the so-called post-truth era.

Ben McNeil is an Oceanographer and Climate Scientist in the Climate Change Research Centre, UNSW, Sydney, with a Masters in Economics.  He has been a passionate science communicator for over 20 years and is the author of “The Clean Industrial Revolution” which makes the economic and scientific case for a low carbon economy.

Full details at https://pubsci.info/

Witchcraft and the Law in England (w/ Deborah Hyde @jourdemayne)
Oct 2 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

The legal approach to witchcraft in England changed considerably over the course of 700 years, reflecting the philosophy, power struggles and politics of each era. At first deprecated as an ignorant superstition, belief in the power of witchcraft eventually became established – even among the most educated.

Deborah Hyde has been Editor-in-Chief of The Skeptic Magazine for over five years. She speaks regularly at conventions, on podcasts and on international broadcast media about why people believe in the supernatural – especially the malign supernatural – using a combination of history and psychology. She thinks that superstition and religion are natural – albeit not ideal – ways of looking at the world.

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

 

Oct
3
Thu
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 2/10
Oct 3 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 2/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

Masters At Work: Techniques And Mediums

We will examine Leonardo’s decisions behind his choice of techniques and mediums, including his use of metal point, black chalk, red chalk, pen and ink and wash, and his early use of oil paint. We will look at exquisite examples of all these, asking what were their uses and how they would affect Leonardo’s choices.

In the archives: Social Biology and Eugenics at LSE
Oct 3 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

An exploration of why a social biology department was set up at LSE, the influence of and reaction to eugenic ideas through archive documents from the 1920s and 30s.

Curator Indy Bhullar and Learning Officer Debbie Challis will be on hand to explain the history of the documents, their context and hear thoughts on them.

This is part of Decolonising the LSE Week, which is organised by staff and students.

Versailles 1919: return of the dangerous women (film screening)
Oct 3 @ 6:00 pm – 6:45 pm

This documentary tells the story of the women who met to protest the terms of the Versailles Peace Treaty in 1919. Drawing from the international campaign to get the vote, they wanted to prevent all future wars. They became the Women’s International League of Peace and Freedom (WILPF) which is still working today.

Versailles 1919: Return of the Dangerous Women is a short documentary (20 minutes) directed by Charlotte Bill and made by Clapham Film Unit, a collective of filmmakers working with communities to tell stories not told elsewhere and funded by the European Commission. It was researched by and features volunteers from the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). The film will be introduced by the director followed by a question and answer with the director and volunteers.

Where Love Is The Way: The Jesus Movement Now w/@PB_Curry
Oct 3 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Where Love Is The Way: The Jesus Movement Now w/@PB_Curry @ St Paul's Cathedral

Jesus came to earth, Michael Curry says, to show us God’s dream for the world:  the dream of a world where no child suffers, no one goes to bed hungry, no one is abandoned and alone:  a world where love is the way.  He came to start a movement, not to found a religion, and the Jesus Movement has the power to turn the world upside down.

But how can we be a part of this movement, in a world where life for too many feels like a nightmare?  How can we make a world of integrity, justice and compassion, where every single person has dignity and freedom?   Michael Curry will explore his vision of God’s passionate dream for humanity and what can happen when we take the Jesus Movement seriously.

The Most Revd Michael Curry is the 27th Presiding Bishop of the Episcopalian Church.  He preached last year at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle and is the author of Following the Way of Jesus, The Power of Love, Crazy Christians: A Call to Follow Jesus and Songs My Grandma Sang (all Hodder Faith 2018-19).

The evening will be chaired by Dr Paula Gooder, Chancellor of St Paul’s Cathedral, and include plenty of time for questions and answers.

Oct
5
Sat
Stories of Hope: Seeking Change in an Unjust World w/@wsvarghese
Oct 5 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Stories of Hope: Seeking Change in an Unjust World w/@wsvarghese @ St Paul's Cathedral

In London, as in many cities, extreme wealth co-exists alongside extreme poverty. How do we as Christian communities and people of faith respond to the reality on our doorsteps, and how do we make a difference? And when the path seems too difficult, where do we draw our strength from?

In this workshop, Winnie Varghese will share some of her experience of working for justice amongst homeless people, the elderly and people with mental illnesses as a part of her ministry in New York City.  Using scripture, story-telling and poetry as well as drawing on our own lived experiences, she will help us together to frame a richly varied response for action in the world. And in doing so we will hope to unearth something of the beauty and power that lies within us, and which often emerges, surprisingly, through this counter-cultural struggle for justice.

The Revd Winnie Varghese is a priest on the Strategic Clergy Team at Trinity Church on Wall Street, New York City: a church located in a city of immense inequality, engaged in social justice with the poor and marginalised. She is a blogger and author of numerous articles on social justice and the church, and much in demand as a speaker about social justice all over the world.

Oct
6
Sun
We commend to you Phoebe: St Paul, Women and the Church [email protected]
Oct 6 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
We commend to you Phoebe: St Paul, Women and the Church w@paulargooder @ St Paul's Cathedral

Sometime around 56 AD, the apostle Paul wrote to the church in Rome.  The letter he sent was arguably his theological masterpiece, and has shaped Christianity ever since.

And he entrusted it to Phoebe, a deacon of the church. Paula Gooder’s new book imagines her journey to Rome and her encounter with the early church there, bringing their joyful, insecure, argumentative community vividly to life.  In doing so she offers new insights into how we might engage afresh with Paul’s theology and in particular how it has affected the role of women in the church.  She will explore why she thinks we’ve been wrong about Paul’s attitude to women, and how Phoebe might be a catalyst to new and liberating ways of engaging with the riches of his thought.

Dr Paula Gooder is Chancellor of St Paul’s Cathedral, the first layperson to hold the role.  One of the best-known New Testament scholars and teachers of our time, her latest book is Phoebe:  A Story (Hodder 2018) and her previous books include Heaven and Body:  Biblical Spirituality for the Whole Person (both SPCK).

Oct
7
Mon
A Platonic view of Homer’s Odyssey
Oct 7 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

A Platonic view of Homer’s Odyssey

Homer, that half-legendary, half-historical figure who links the oral story-telling age of mythology to the literate age of high Greek civilization is known for his two great epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey: the Platonic tradition mined both works for their profound insights into the human condition. Over two evening sessions we will concentrate on the Odyssey which is seen by Platonic philosophers as a representation of the soul’s re-ascent to her true home – the celestial “Ithica.” The tests that Odysseus undergoes as he makes his way from the shores of Troy, laden with treasure, to the cave upon Ithica’s shore in which the Goddess Athena appears before him can be considered as images of the various trials each of us must face as we cross the ocean of life before regaining the lost empire of the soul. We will draw upon the writings of the neoplatonists and on Thomas Taylor’s essay ‘On the Wanderings of Ulysses’ and consider what lessons the epic holds for us and our own wanderings.

This is the first of two sessions looking at this theme (the second session is on Monday 21st October).

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Oct
8
Tue
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 3/10
Oct 8 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 3/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

Splendour in the Marches

Federigo da Montefeltro, Duke of Urbino, was in many ways the ideal Renaissance ruler – courageous soldier, benevolent statesman and cultivated and lavish patron of the arts. We will concentrate on the paintings, architecture, manuscripts and sculpture associated with Federigo, but also cast a glance at his arch‐enemy Sigismondo Malatesta of Rimini, “more wild beast than man”.

Oct
9
Wed
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 3/10
Oct 9 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 3/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Established in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera lectures.

In this series of paired lectures and walks will look at the ways in which particular groups, often professions, have shaped and been shaped by London. Each theme could provide a course of its own, so we will proceed through a series of snapshots at the activities of these groups and individuals at key moments in the formation of the city.

Lecture Merchants

London is a city conceived for trade. Sited at the lowest easily bridgeable part of the Thames, a conduit leading to the Continent. From Roman times the Port of London was vital to the prosperity of the country at large, and at one stage the Port was the largest in the world. Other forms of trade have also flourished, with London established as a financial centre from the 13th century onwards.

Walk
The week after the lecture (16 Oct) there will be a walk in the City and close to the Thames
Oct
10
Thu
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: The Life of the Universal Man 3/10
Oct 10 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: The Life of the Universal Man 3/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

Sculpture And The World Of The Antique

Although no sculptures by Leonardo exist, we will examine his influences from the antique world, his sculptural design ideas and how they would play into the narrative of the Renaissance aesthetic. We will also consider the drawings that were made to demonstrate how he might have constructed these artworks.

Oct
15
Tue
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 4/10
Oct 15 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 4/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

Poets and Soldiers

The d’Este rulers of Ferrara created an environment of taste and magnificence, brick and marble, of the finest paintings, in a city which they made a model of early urban planning and is now a Unesco World Heritage site. Much of their collections is now dispersed, but we will consider their impact as well as that of the sculpture, architecture and painting which remain. In contrast, the Sforza of Milan were terrifying warlords but also commissioned some of Leonardo’s finest work during his 18 years at their court.

Oct
17
Thu
The Course / Leonard da Vinci: The Life of the Universal Man 4/10
Oct 17 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonard da Vinci: The Life of the Universal Man 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

The Art And The Meaning Of Portraiture

We will look at Leonardo’s interest in portraiture; his own image and what that might tell us about the man as well as portraits of ruling families, including La Giocondo or Lisa Gherardini, now known as the Mona Lisa. We will also examine his obsession with the Madonna and child grouping, his sources for these compositions and what he hoped to achieve with his constant revisiting of this subject.

In the Archives: Eduard Rosenbaum, emigre and librarian
Oct 17 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
In the Archives: Eduard Rosenbaum, emigre and librarian @ LSE Library

Graham Camfield, former LSE Librarian and historian, introduces Eduard Rosenbaum who was supported by the Academic Assistance Council to leave Nazi Germany. Rosenbaum spent his career at LSE Library and shaped its collections.

Eduard Rosenbaum was “an economist of standing and a scholar fully conversant with the economic and social literature of at least five European countries” and had been Director of the Library of the Hamburg Chamber of Commerce before he was forced out of his post.

Oct
19
Sat
Singing the Song of Creation: St Francis and the Canticle of the Creatures
Oct 19 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
Singing the Song of Creation: St Francis and the Canticle of the Creatures @ Royal Foundation of St Katherine

The Canticle of the Creatures is St Francis’ great song of love, praise and thanksgiving to God. Written late in his life when he was blind and following a period of deep despair, it is both an outpouring of joy in creation and the distillation of a lifetime’s hard-won wisdom.  In it he calls us to join with the sun, moon and stars in the praise of God, and also to praise God through our lives, forgiving each other and living together in peace.

Written in the 13th century, it is full of wisdom we urgently need today.  In a time when we often experience a lack of connection between ourselves, other people and the world around us, the Canticle can teach us to ground ourselves both in the beauty of the natural world and our place as a part of the family of creation.

In this reflective day we will explore the Canticle’s beauty and wisdom, its origins in St Francis’ own life, including his sense of himself as a ‘Troubadour of the Lord’ proclaiming a love song in praise of his Beloved, and how its beauty and wisdom illuminate his own thinking, faith and relationship with God.  We will also reflect on its profound ecological and psychological insights for us and our world today.

Br Sam SSF was until recently the Brother-in-Charge at Hilfield Friary in Dorset, and now lives in the Franciscan community in East London.  He is much in demand as a retreat leader and speaker, and is co-authoring a book about St Francis’ wisdom for our own times for Canterbury Press.

The day includes reflective worship, lunch and other refreshments and takes place at the Royal Foundation of St Katharine in Limehouse, East London (www.rfsk.org.uk).  We are very grateful to St Katharine’s for their hospitality in co-hosting our reflective days.

Oct
21
Mon
A Platonic view of Homer’s Odyssey – 2
Oct 21 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

A Platonic view of Homer’s Odyssey – 2

Homer, that half-legendary, half-historical figure who links the oral story-telling age of mythology to the literate age of high Greek civilization is known for his two great epics, the Iliad and the Odyssey: the Platonic tradition mined both works for their profound insights into the human condition. Over two evening sessions we will concentrate on the Odyssey which is seen by Platonic philosophers as a representation of the soul’s re-ascent to her true home – the celestial “Ithica.” The tests that Odysseus undergoes as he makes his way from the shores of Troy, laden with treasure, to the cave upon Ithica’s shore in which the Goddess Athena appears before him can be considered as images of the various trials each of us must face as we cross the ocean of life before regaining the lost empire of the soul. We will draw upon the writings of the neoplatonists and on Thomas Taylor’s essay ‘On the Wanderings of Ulysses’ and consider what lessons the epic holds for us and our own wanderings.

This is the second of two sessions looking at this theme (the first session is on Monday 7th October) – we will begin the evening with a summary of the main points from the first session.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Oct
22
Tue
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 5/10
Oct 22 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 5/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

Smoke and Mirrors

Mantua, small and muddy, was one of the least powerful of Italian city states but through extraordinary and judicious patronage of the arts, the Gonzaga dynasty presented itself as the equal of all contemporaries. Alberti in architecture, Pisanello and Mantegna in painting created an image of splendour which made the city the envy of its contemporaries.

Oct
24
Thu
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: The Life of the Universal Man 5/10
Oct 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: The Life of the Universal Man 5/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

Inside The Mind Of Man – Grotesques, Personality & Caricature

Leonardo’s mind and its supposed impact on physiognomy and ultimately personality will be the subject for this session. We will look at a wide variety of his drawings of physiological types and ask if these can tell us about the social mores of Leonardo’s times and ultimately how the explorations into the human psyche affected Leonardo’s finished works such as The Last Supper.