Oct
18
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Samurai Culture) 2/7
Oct 18 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Samurai Culture) 2/7 @ The Course at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Samurai Culture: martial arts & fine arts

Medieval society, Bushido, swords, painting & calligraphy
The artisan class, crafts & innovations.

State Torture by Professor Joanna Bourke
Oct 18 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
State Torture by Professor Joanna Bourke @ Barnard's Inn Hall | England | United Kingdom

Torture was officially outlawed in France in the 1780s and in Europe during the nineteenth century. In the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, it has returned as an instrument of state policy.

The defence of torture is no longer viewed with abhorrence. How have languages of patriotism, law and order, justice, the ‘civilizing mission’, and human rights been used to foster attitudes towards and practices of torture in Western societies? What should our responses be?

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
20
Sat
The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe Live
Oct 20 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm
The Skeptics’ Guide to the Universe Live @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Join the presenters of ‘The Skeptics Guide to the Universe’ podcast for their one-off London show. Steven Novella, along with ‘Skeptical Rogues’ Bob NovellaJay Novella and Evan Bernstein explain the tenets of skeptical thinking and debunk some of the biggest scientific myths, fallacies and conspiracy theories (anti-vaccines, homeopathy, UFO sightings, and many more.) They’ll help us try to make sense of what seems like an increasingly crazy world using powerful tools like science and philosophy.

In what promises to be a fascinating and entertaining evening, come and hear tips and tricks on how to see through the fake news and media manipulation in our increasingly confusing world.

‘A fantastic compendium of skeptical thinking and the perfect primer for anyone who wants to separate fact from fiction.’ Richard Wiseman, author of 59 Seconds

‘A terrific book for anyone who wants a better understanding about the world around them and an essential guide to navigating modern life. THE SKEPTICS’ GUIDE TO THE UNIVERSE will help readers recognize pitfalls in reasoning, combat bad arguments and avoid superstitious thinking.’ — Simon Singh, author of The Code Book and Fermat’s Last Theorem

‘Thorough, informative, and enlightening… If this book does not become required reading for us all, we may well see modern civilisation unravel before our eyes.’ Neil deGrasse Tyson, author of Astrophysics for People in a Hurry

Oct
22
Mon
The ‘Autism Advantage’ in the Workplace by Adam Feinstein
Oct 22 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The 'Autism Advantage' in the Workplace by Adam Feinstein @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Adam Feinstein will examine the strengths of many people on the autism spectrum which make them an untapped human resource in the workplace. Using case studies, he will analyse potential employment openings across the autism spectrum and demonstrate why employing autistic people makes sound economic sense. He will examine misleading stereotypes and assess the alternative option of self-employment.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
23
Tue
The Course / The History of German Art (Lucas Cranach the Elder) 4/9
Oct 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of German Art (Lucas Cranach the Elder) 4/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553)

Cranach was one of the leading German painters and printmakers of the early 16th century with an incredibly successful workshop. He was the Elector of Saxony’s court painter and the official portraitist of Martin Luther, as well as the Reformation’s chief artist. We will examine Cranach’s output, style of painting and how that style changed as he became more involved with the cause of the Reformation. His altarpieces, Lutheran subject pictures, portraits, as well as mythological works and nudes will all be studied. We will also investigate the success of Cranach among Humanist scholars, rulers, religious leaders and the controversy that still surrounds some of his works.

It from Bit: The Science of Information by Professor Richard Harvey
Oct 23 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
It from Bit: The Science of Information by Professor Richard Harvey @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Physicist John Wheeler asked the famous ‘It from bit?’ question: what if at its heart the universe is not a collection of particles, forces and fields but rather a collection of bits? If this is true, it leads us to new insights in compression, machine learning, artificial intelligence and maybe even the universe and life itself.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Hearing the Light: Skipping Pylons and the Strange Sound of Silent Motion
Oct 23 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Hearing the Light: Skipping Pylons and the Strange Sound of Silent Motion @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

When the viral ‘jumping pylon’ gif hit the internet recently, many people discovered they could ‘hear’ juddering or thudding sensations evoked by moving images.

Neuroscientist Elliot Freeman has had a head start researching this ‘visual-ear’ phenomenon, having experienced it most of his life. He will present his latest findings from internet surveys, brain stimulation experiments and neuroimaging, which reveal what kinds of people have a ‘visual ear’, and what their brains might be doing.

Dr Freeman is a Senior Lecturer and researcher in perceptual neuroscience at City, University of London, and has authored numerous articles on individual differences in perception. His work has featured in New Scientist, Guardian, Le Monde, Canada National Post, and New York Times.

Oct
24
Wed
Dark Matters by Professor Joseph Silk
Oct 24 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Dark Matters by Professor Joseph Silk @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

The dark side of the universe is pervasive. Most of the matter in the universe is dark, most of the energy in the universe is dark. Many searches are underway, on mountain peaks, in deep underground mines, and in space, to discover more about dark matters. Many new telescopes are being constructed on high mountain tops and in space to search for tracers of dark energy.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Mathematics in War and Peace by Professor David Aubin, Professor June Barrow-Green and Professor Tony Royle
Oct 24 @ 4:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Mathematics in War and Peace by Professor David Aubin, Professor June Barrow-Green and Professor Tony Royle @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

THE 2018 BRITISH SOCIETY FOR THE HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS / GRESHAM COLLEGE ANNUAL LECTURE

As a commemoration of the end of the First World War, the event will focus on the theme of mathematics in war and peacetime.

The main speaker, Professor David Aubin will speak on Science Leaders under Fire: Stories about Mathematicians Killed in World War I (6 pm), preceded by shorter presentations by Professor June Barrow-Green on Euler’s Work on Ballistics (4 pm) and by Professor Tony Royle on The Nature of Life for the Flying Mathematicians of the Royal Aircraft Factory During World War I (4.45 pm).

There will be a short break at 5.30 pm during which refreshments can be purchased from the Museum cafeteria. Ends at 7 pm.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
25
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art and Modern Culture (Architecture and Gardens) 3/7
Oct 25 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art and Modern Culture (Architecture and Gardens) 3/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Architecture & Gardens: villas, tea houses & modern Style

In this lecture, you will see how Japanese space & contemporary tea houses
Influenced Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Bauhaus

Haunted by Christ: Modern Writers and the Struggle for Faith by Lord Harries of Pentregarth with Professor Alec Ryrie
Oct 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Haunted by Christ: Modern Writers and the Struggle for Faith by Lord Harries of Pentregarth with Professor Alec Ryrie @ Barnard's Inn Hall | England | United Kingdom

In his new book, Haunted by Christ, Richard Harries explores the role of faith in the lives of twenty novelists and poets. Non-believers like Samuel Beckett and Philip Pullman as well as believers like T.S. Eliot and W.H. Auden all struggled with faith.

At a time when religions language is meaningless or feels stale for many, we can rediscover its freshness and force in the works of novelists and poets.

Lord Harries will be in conversation with Alec Ryrie, the new Gresham Professor of Divinity.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
28
Sun
The Ethical Stripper
Oct 28 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
The Ethical Stripper @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

How can a feminist also be a stripper? Is stripping sex work? What makes sex work “ethical”?

Forget everything you’ve heard about strippers: this talk is an antidote to stigma, shame and stereotyping. Stacey Clare has been part of the much maligned, misunderstood and misrepresented world of UK strip clubs since the age of 22. She opens-up about her work and experiences with this candid and critical perspective of the industry.

You already know the stereotypes. The strong, independent female who strips to support her own sumptuous lifestyle choices; the smart, sassy student who strips to pay her way through university, or the savvy immigrant who sends money to her family back home. Or what about the wayward party girl rebelling against her strict upbringing, or the single-mum raising her child with precious little in the way of resources?

What about the Buddhist, stripper-turned-activist and public speaker with a fine art degree, who works part-time as a care assistant and has a passion for theatre, feminism and human rights? Heard about her yet?

Stacey is one of the fierce, feisty, phenomenal co-founder of East London Strippers Collective. She has been stripping for more than a decade, and has mastered the art of sexual entertainment. Before stripping, Stacey was a political rebel fighting for social justice and experiencing protest/direct action as a performance (in costume or character). As a fine art student, her work concentrated on performance art and theatre, and she still involves herself in community theatre projects that deal with projects that are close to her heart, including Sex Workers’ Opera (https://www.sexworkersopera.com/)

Her book The Ethical Stripper is seeking crowd-funding on Unbound.

Oct
29
Mon
The Platonic tradition on the Providential Universe
Oct 29 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Fundamental to Plato’s philosophy was the affirmation that the whole of reality is an ordered unfolding of the first principle which he calls the Good. The manifested cosmos, he says (in the Timaeus) is made by a good maker who looks to the best paradigm from which to work, so that it is “the best of generated natures” and that the producing divinity “was willing that all things should be good, and that as much as possible nothing should be evil.” Plato’s universe is a far cry from modernity’s purposeless and chance-driven thing: from his standpoint, the ordered reality in which we live can be considered as a providential outpouring of goodness with each element of it receiving and giving its appropriate good.

But where does that leave our concepts of human free will? And our experience of evil? And how does this fit in with the workings of nature in which there is not only generation but decay and death?

We will read extracts from Plato’s dialogues, and from treatises from Plotinus and Proclus and discuss the ideas which they put forward as prompts for our own thoughts on the providential universe.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Oct
30
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Hans Holbein the Younger) 5/9
Oct 30 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Hans Holbein the Younger) 5/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Hans Holbein the Younger

Hans Holbein was born in c.1497-8 in Augsburg and was taught by his father, Hans Holbein the Elder. Recommended to the court of Henry VIII by the humanist Erasmus Deriderius, he spent two periods of his life in England (1526-8 and 1532-43), portraying the nobility of the Tudor court. We will look at his work including his most famous portraits, Henry VIII and “The Ambassadors”. The latter, an enigmatic full-length double portrait is a political statement as much as a record of two friends (Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve, the Bishop of Lavaur) at a time of turmoil and upheaval (1533) when Henry VIII was seeking to divorce Catherine of Aragon in order to re-marry Anne Boleyn.

Bribery and Corruption in the City by HHJ Nicholas Cooke QC
Oct 30 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Bribery and Corruption in the City by HHJ Nicholas Cooke QC @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Crime thrives in a social environment which is conductive to its commission, and it harms the society which spawns it most of all. That is as true of bribery and corruption as it is true of knife-armed postcode gangs. If the common ethical code that prevents the vast majority from offending in a particular way begins to break down, there is a serious problem.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
31
Wed
Performing Medicine, Performing Surgery by Professor Roger Kneebone
Oct 31 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Performing Medicine, Performing Surgery by Professor Roger Kneebone @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Medicine demands factual knowledge, physical skill and the ability to work with patients and colleagues. Most of the time clinicians learn from other clinicians, studying hard within a frame that discourages exploration outside medicine.

Focusing on the performance of medicine challenges this frame by connecting with actors, musicians, craftsmen, dancers and other experts. This lecture explores the idea of frames, using illustrations to ask what benefits may result from thinking widely and challenging longstanding assumptions.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Nov
1
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Costume & Textile) 4/7
Nov 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Costume & Textile) 4/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Costume & Textiles: development of kimono

In this lecture we will look at Theatre costumes, Crafting the Kimono
Modern day Kimono style

How the Reformation Trained Us To Be Sceptics by Professor Alec Ryrie
Nov 1 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
How the Reformation Trained Us To Be Sceptics by Professor Alec Ryrie @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

The Protestant Reformation confronted Europeans with a clamour of religious alternatives. Catholics and Protestants taught their people to doubt the other side’s religion (while still believing their own) and taught them to be incredulous while maintaining that faith is a virtue.

This lecture will trace how, as Europe’s religious landscape fractured, some people fell between the cracks. In long religious wars of attrition, it was all too easy to conclude that all religions were equally true, or equally false.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Nov
5
Mon
Parmenides On Nature – an initiation?
Nov 5 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Parmenides (perhaps 520-440 BCE) has been linked to the school of Pythagoras by some scholars: he was certainly an central figure in the Eleatic school of philosophy which flourished in Magna Graecia (Southern Italy) and which clearly influenced Plato. His poem On Nature (which survives in fragmentary form) is framed as an initiatory vision: it speaks of the oneness of being, and the path of knowledge; it also speaks of the ever-changing world which is the subject of opinion – an altogether less certain sphere of understanding. We’ll look at some of the fragments and endeavour to follow Parmenides through the “gates of the ways of Night and Day.”

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Nov
6
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Adam Elsheimer) 6/9
Nov 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Adam Elsheimer) 6/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Adam Elsheimer (1578-1610)

This painter is often left out of the historical canon of art history or when included is often difficult to place. Adam Elsheimer was born and trained in Frankfurt and almost exclusively worked on a small scale and painted in oil on copper. We will look at his visits to Munich, Venice and Rome and although his output was small, we will look at the influence of these works on more wellknown artists (Rubens, Rembrandt and Claude) and the influence of Renaissance Venetian artists on him (Tintoretto and Veronese). We will also concentrate on his landscapes, religious works and dynamic compositions as well as the spectacular lighting effects that he learned from the work of those Venetian artists

Making Information Personal: Companions by Professor Yorick Wilks
Nov 6 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Making Information Personal: Companions by Professor Yorick Wilks @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Professor Wilks will discuss the notion of an artificial Companion, a long-term software agent that could be present in any device: a screen, handbag or even a furry toy – and which understands the person it ‘lives’ with and whose memories and knowledge it comes to acquire and manage through conversation. One can think of a core function of Companion as living with an elderly person, lonely and wanting to revisit their memories and memorabilia, but needing assistance with information and agency.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Shakespeare’s Stages by Michael Pennington
Nov 6 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Shakespeare's Stages by Michael Pennington @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Leading actor and Shakespeare scholar Michael Pennington discusses the direct effect on the dramatist’s writing of the theatres he wrote for, so different from ours. From cinematic intimacy to heroic spaciousness, his plays reflect his actors’ technique and the social range of his audience, allowing him the means to look further and deeper into the human condition, its public and inner life, than any dramatist has achieved before or since.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Nov
7
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Moderns and Anti-Moderns) 4/10
Nov 7 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Moderns and Anti-Moderns) 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Moderns and Anti-Moderns

Perhaps because of its size, perhaps because of something conservative in the English character, London didn’t embrace very fully the art and architecture of the modern movement. Despite this, the Interwar period saw a flowering of arts, particularly literature, in the city, which reflected and contributed to wider currents elsewhere.

The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November by Professor David Stevenson
Nov 7 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The Ending of World War I: The Road to 11 November by Professor David Stevenson @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

This lecture will re-examine how the First World War ended, anticipating the centenary commemorations in 2018. It will discuss both why Germany requested a ceasefire, and why the Allies and America granted one. It will argue that the German army was near collapse, and that Germany was not defeated by a ‘stab in the back’ at home. None the less, the Allies had good reasons not to press on to Berlin.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Do no harm. But first, “nature.” – w/@NaturoDiaries
Nov 7 @ 7:30 pm

Naturopaths have defined their brand of medicine using a set of “healing” principles that sound pleasant, but really describe an archaic and sometimes twisted understanding of medicine. Having been a former naturopathic “doctor,” I can say that the overwhelming majority of naturopathic care relies extensively on dubious alternative therapies, rather than established protocols based on medical and scientific research. When it comes to naturopathy, “nature” always trumps the oath to do no harm. Join former naturopathic doctor Britt Hermes for a deconstruction of naturopathy’s defining principles and what to do about the growing trend of natural medicine.

Britt Hermes is a writer, scientist, and a former naturopathic doctor. She practiced as a licensed naturopath in the United States for three years and then left the profession after realizing naturopathy is a pseudoscientific ideology. Since this time, Britt has been working to understand and communicate how she was tricked by alternative medicine, so others do not repeat her mistake. She now writes to expose issues with naturopathy, the current rising profession in alternative medicine. Her work focuses on the deceptions naturopathic practitioners employ to scam patients and contrive legitimacy in political arenas. Britt’s writings can be found at Forbes, Science 2.0, KevinMD, and Science-Based Medicine. She hopes her stories will protect patients from the false beliefs and bogus treatments sold by alternative medicine practitioners.