Jan
23
Mon
The Rise and Fall of the Adelphi
Jan 23 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

The Adelphi was to be the Adam brothers’ most celebrated urban development – a vast, complex of roads, townhouses, shops and even a subterranean roadway. It was expected to bring them great wealth, and to immortalise their names on the streets of London. Instead, it took them to the edge of bankruptcy and tarnished their reputations forever.

Join Colin Thom, Senior Historian at the University College London’s Bartlett School of Architecture, for this evening talk on the Adelphi project, from its hopeful inception to its eventual demise. Guests will be able to enjoy a drink on arrival and a private view of the exhibition Robert Adam’s London.

An Evening w/@Cmdr_Hadfield
Jan 23 @ 7:30 pm
An Evening w/@Cmdr_Hadfield @ The New Wimbledon Theatre | United Kingdom

“Good morning, Earth!” That is how Colonel Chris Hadfield—writing on Twitter—woke up the world every day while living for five months aboard the International Space Station.

Through his 21-years as an astronaut, three spaceflights and 2600 orbits of Earth, Colonel Hadfield has become a worldwide sensation, harnessing the power of social media to make outer space accessible to millions and infusing a sense of wonder into our collective consciousness not felt since humanity first walked on the Moon. Called “the most famous astronaut since Neil Armstrong,” Colonel Hadfield continues to bring the marvels of science and space travel to everyone he encounters.

Colonel Hadfield is a pioneer of many historic “firsts”. In 1992, he was selected by the Canadian Space Agency as a NASA Mission Specialist—Canada’s first fully-qualified Space Shuttle crew member. Three years later, aboard Shuttle Atlantis, he was the first Canadian to operate the Canadarm in space, and the first Canadian to board a Russian spacecraft as he helped build space station “Mir.” In 2001, aboard Shuttle Endeavour, Colonel Hadfield performed two spacewalks—the first Canadian to do so—and, in 2013, he was Commander of the International Space Station—the first and only Canadian to ever command a spaceship—so far.

During his multi-faceted career, Colonel Hadfield has intercepted Soviet bombers in Canadian airspace, lived on the ocean floor, been NASA’s Director of Operations in Russia, and recorded science and music videos seen by hundreds of millions.

A heavily decorated astronaut, engineer, and pilot, Colonel Hadfield’s many awards include receiving the Order of Canada, the Meritorious Service Cross, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. He was named the Top Test Pilot in both the US Air Force and the US Navy, and has been inducted into Canada’s Aviation Hall of Fame.

Colonel Hadfield is the author of two internationally bestselling books, An Astronaut’s Guide to Life on Earth and You Are Here, and has been commemorated on Canadian postage stamps, Royal Canadian Mint coins, and on Canada’s newest five dollar bill (along with fellow astronauts Steve MacLean and Dave Williams)

Jan
24
Tue
The Course, The Arts of Christianity 3/10
Jan 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course, The Arts of Christianity 3/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this series of 10 lectures, Nicole Mezey will examine how no single theme has so preoccupied the western artist as has Christianity. It is the only one of the world’s great monotheistic faiths to allow, indeed to encourage, representation, and the history, narratives and practice of the Faith are richly reflected in its art. Cherubim and chasubles, Passion and pilgrimages, Samson and St. Lucy – this course explores a range of Christian themes, some of the devotional and other forms in which they were expressed, and the experiences and ideas which inspired them.

STORYTELLING 2 – NEW TESTAMENT

In the third lecture, we will look at how The New Testament provides the essential core of Christianity, the life of Christ and his early followers. Through the ages, the Church has emphasised different episodes to explore dominant theological issues, and we follow this in the arts from the restraint of medieval fonts to the baroque intensity of Rubens.

Creating paranormal drama for film and TV
Jan 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Creating paranormal drama for film and TV @ Lecture Theatre LG01, Professor Stuart Hall Building, Goldsmiths, University of London | England | United Kingdom

How does a childhood interest in ghost stories and horror grow into a fascination with the scientific study of the paranormal? And how does that in turn feed back into creating dramas about the supernatural? Stephen Volk is an avowed sceptic, yet repeatedly drawn to telling tales of the spooky and other-worldly, in books, on stage, on film and for the small screen, working both in Britain and in Hollywood. He will be talking about his reasons for writing in the genre and his attitude to his subject matter.

Biography
Stephen Volk is probably best known as the BAFTA-winning writer of ITV’s paranormal drama series Afterlife starring Lesley Sharp and Andrew Lincoln, and the notorious (some say legendary) BBC TV “Halloween hoax” Ghostwatch, which spooked the nation, hit the headlines, and caused questions to be raised in Parliament.

In 2015 he adapted Phil Rickman’s novel Midwinter of the Spirit as a 3-part miniseries for ITV, starring Anna Maxwell Martin and David Thelfall, while his last feature film was 2011’s The Awakening, a period ghost story starring Rebecca Hall, Dominic West and Imelda Staunton.

His most recent play The Chapel of Unrest premiered exclusively at The Bush Theatre, London, starring Jim Broadbent and Reece Shearsmith and his short story collection Monsters in the Heart won the British Fantasy Award for Best Collection in 2014, while his story Newspaper Heart won Best Novella in 2015.

His first produced screenplay was Ken Russell’s Gothic (1986), a trippy telling of the Mary Shelley/origin of Frankenstein story starring Gabriel Byrne, Natasha Richardson and Timothy Spall.

His other scripts since then include The Guardian, directed and co-written by William (The Exorcist) Friedkin; Superstition starring Mark Strong and Charlotte Rampling; and Octane starring Madeleine Stowe, Norman Reedus and Jonathan Rhys Meyers, as well as screenplays for Goldcrest, MGM, Sony/Columbia, Paramount, TriStar, Universal, BBC Films and StudioCanal.

Introduction to Nietzsche
Jan 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

GOD IS DEAD, screamed Friedrich Nietzsche in several of his works. But what did he mean?

If you’ve ever been interested in the works of the German philosopher, or nihilism in general, then this is the talk for you. Over the course of 45 minutes Matt Vere will introduce you to the core ideas of Nietzsche through an engaging lecture, with space for questions and discussion at the end. A great stepping stone for those who’ve always wanted to get into philosophy, but didn’t know where to start.

Bring an alert and open mind and get ready to learn!

This talk is suitable anyone over 12.

Free, with a suggested donation of £3-5. Please confirm you are attending through the Facebook event page. Tea and light refreshments will be available.

*Transition Heathrow is a grassroots movement which aims to bring the principles of transition towns to the area affected by Heathrow Airport and its proposed expansion. We are based at Grow Heathrow in the village Sipson, a reclaimed market garden which runs entirely off-grid.*

Jan
25
Wed
The Journey of Childhood Public health: From the Victorian Age to the present
Jan 25 @ 5:30 pm
The Journey of Childhood Public health: From the Victorian Age to the present @ Royal College of Nursing | England | United Kingdom

From inter-war malnutrition to Every Child Matters.

The health issues facing children in the UK have changed dramatically since the emphasis on child labour in Charles Kingsley’s The Water Babies (1863): Florence Nightingale’s personal copy of this text features in our exhibition. Dr Jane K. Seymour (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine) explores the role of public health doctors and their teams, which included school nurses and health visitors, in the inter-war period, while Professor Viv Bennett CBE (Chief Nurse, Public Health England) reflects on later developments in child health.

How do we ensure that every child gets the best start in life?

The Age of Aquarius and the future of humanity
Jan 25 @ 7:00 pm
The Age of Aquarius and the future of humanity @ New Acropolis Cultural Association | England | United Kingdom

In this lecture I will be describing the nature of the astrological ages of the past and how they have manifested and affected humanity throughout the years. I will also be looking at the current astrological age we are entering, which is the Age of Aquarius. What does this mean for us, how will it manifest for us as human beings, what does the future look like and how best can we work with it?

Israel Ajose

Jan
26
Thu
The Course, Ceramics – Masters and Makers 3/5
Jan 26 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course, Ceramics – Masters and Makers 3/5 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

Ceramics has been important in European culture for both utilitarian and artistic purposes. This 5 part series looks at materials and techniques over the last 500 years and explores some of the key aspects of production in the history of European culture – tin glazed wares produced in Italy during the C16th, the pioneering development of factories at Meissen, Sevres and Wedgwood and the explosion of production and creativity that occurred in C19th Britain.

Opportunities for collecting ceramic pieces will be highlighted

MASTERS OF C18TH EUROPEAN PORCELAIN 

In this lecture, we will see that the C18th was particularly important for the development of factory production. Meissen created Europe’s first true porcelain production, Sevres whose soft paste artificial porcelain was the envy of the western world and Wedgwood who developed new bodies using scientific research, employed top designers and developed modern business practices still being used today.

The Role of Context in Learning the Meanings of Words
Jan 26 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
The Role of Context in Learning the Meanings of Words @ RHB 110 (Cinema), Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths, University of London | England | United Kingdom

Vocabulary acquisition is an important milestone in early cognitive development. Although children appear to guess the meaning of a new word effortlessly, questions remain about how children commit word-meaning associations to memory for later retrieval. This talk will review several empirical studies demonstrating the initial naming context plays a critical role in how well children form robust memory representations of new name-object associations. We will explore word-learning contexts in terms of both the to-be-learned targets and the other objects that may be present and competing for children’s attention. This series of studies includes both traditional referent selection (process-of-elimination) tasks as well as teaching children words from reading storybooks. Overall, it’s not just what is named that matters — but the context in which the initial naming occurs.

Biography
Jessica S. Horst earned her Ph.D. at the University of Iowa in 2007 and has since been a faculty member at the University of Sussex. Her research focuses on how young children learn names for object categories using both real (toy) objects and storybooks. The research with storybooks has been effectively applied across several community intervention programmes designed to engage young children with books.

Jessica’s interest in child language grew after she moved to Germany as a child with little knowledge of the German language. After obtaining her Abitur from a German Gymnasium, she then attended Boston University where she majored in Philosophy and Psychology with a minor in German Language and Literature. In addition to various articles on child language acquisition, she is also the author of The Psychology Research Companion: From Student Project to Working Life.

The Spirits of Crossbones Graveyard
Jan 26 @ 7:45 pm
The Spirits of Crossbones Graveyard @ The Bell | England | United Kingdom

Every month, an iconoclastic group of Londoners gather at a site in Southwark known as Crossbones Graveyard to commemorate the souls of mediaeval prostitutes believed to be buried there – the “Winchester Geese”.

This is a pilgrimage site for self-identified misfits, nonconformists and contemporary sex workers who leave memorials to the outcast dead. The ritual interpretation of the history of the site has struck a chord with many who feel alienated in present-day London.

Oxford anthropologist Professor Sondra L Hausner looks at the historical practices of sex work, the relation of the Church to these professions, and their representation in the present, arguing that ritual is a way of creating the contemporary world by mobilising stories of the past.

Jan
28
Sat
Collecting in a Cold Climate
Jan 28 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Collecting in a Cold Climate @ Bethlem Museum of the Mind, Bethlem Royal Hospital | England | United Kingdom

Mary Spencer Jones of the Natural History Museum speaks on polar explorer and sometime Bethlem patient Denis Gascoigne Lillie (1884-1963) and the marine collections from the voyage of the Terra Nova.

Jan
31
Tue
The Course, The Arts of Christianity 4/10
Jan 31 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course, The Arts of Christianity 4/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this series of 10 lectures, Nicole Mezey will examine how no single theme has so preoccupied the western artist as has Christianity. It is the only one of the world’s great monotheistic faiths to allow, indeed to encourage, representation, and the history, narratives and practice of the Faith are richly reflected in its art. Cherubim and chasubles, Passion and pilgrimages, Samson and St. Lucy – this course explores a range of Christian themes, some of the devotional and other forms in which they were expressed, and the experiences and ideas which inspired them.

FOR ALL THE SAINTS …..

In this lecture, we will look at the saints of the Church beginning in the Bible itself, but many favourites have separate, later stories of their own. St George and St Katherine may still be familiar, but what about St Apollonia or St William of York? St Zita or Little St Hugh of Lincoln? Each has their unique tale and their importance to the lives of the faithful.

Feb
1
Wed
HOW LONDON BECAME THE GREATEST CITY ON EARTH ( 11/12)
Feb 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
HOW LONDON BECAME THE GREATEST CITY ON EARTH ( 11/12) @ The Course at the University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this series of 6 lectures and 6 accompanying walks, lecturer Harry Mount, will show HOW LONDON BECAME THE GREATEST CITY ON EARTH. More than any other country on the planet, Britain has pooled its constitutional, financial and cultural forces within its capital. This 6 part series of lectures and 6 accompanying walks will explore how, over 2,000 years, London has dealt with six of those forces: the monarchy; the law; religion; finance; entertainment; and education. The story of the Reformation, of constitutional monarchy, of Shakespearean theatre, of the public school, of the common law, the story of Britain…. They can all be told through London’s unique collection of buildings. 

EDUCATIONAL LONDON

This lecture (1 Feb 2017) and walk (* Feb 2017) will address the expansion of London education from church and private schools to state education and the growth of the capital’s university education as it caught up with the traditional Oxbridge ones. It will examine the origins of church schools as typified by the Grey Coat Hospital School in Westminster and how the earliest private schools were also religious foundations (St Paul’s and Westminster). The beginnings of government education with the 1870 Education Act led to the Board Schools, the vast, red-brick, arts and craft buildings, across the country. These were designed to be as light and airy as possible to counter the gloomy, unhealthy conditions of the workhouse – such as the surviving one in Fitzrovia, which inspired Dickens to write Oliver Twist. The City of London School was built in 1834, on the actual site of the old London Workhouse. Universities came late to London: from University College London (1826) to King’s College London (1829). UCL was expressly founded as a secular alternative to Oxbridge. The story of London University echoes the expansion of British universities in general. Over the years, London University has sprouted new extensions – including the Courtauld Institute, now in neo-classical Somerset House.

 

Feb
2
Thu
The Course, Ceramics – Masters and Makers 4/5
Feb 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course, Ceramics – Masters and Makers 4/5 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

Ceramics has been important in European culture for both utilitarian and artistic purposes. This 5 part series looks at materials and techniques over the last 500 years and explores some of the key aspects of production in the history of European culture – tin glazed wares produced in Italy during the C16th, the pioneering development of factories at Meissen, Sevres and Wedgwood and the explosion of production and creativity that occurred in C19th Britain.

Opportunities for collecting ceramic pieces will be highlighted

INNOVATION IN VICTORIAN CERAMICS                      

In this lecture, we will see how in C19th Britain, ceramic manufacture and entrepreneurship reached a peak with firms such as Spode, Minton and Copeland as well as the development of innovatory new materials, styles and techniques of production. (Majolica pottery, parianware, pate sur pate and encaustic)

 

Cognitive embodiment: how sensorimotor experience shapes perception
Feb 2 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Cognitive neuroscience and philosophy have attributed a special role to our own body and actions during visual perception. This phenomenon is called embodiment. In this talk, I will present different properties of embodiment (at the neural and cognitive levels) in a series of studies that explore (a) the impact of physical/motor expertise (e.g. dancers) in action observation, (b) the role of our own body in the recognition and memory of emotion and actions, (c) and the impact of embodiment on very specifically human ways of seeing (i.e. aesthetic perception).

Biography
Dr Beatriz Calvo-Merino is a cognitive neuroscientist working at the Psychology Department, City, University of London. She trained at University College London (UCL) and Universidad Complutense de Madrid (Spain). Her research has focussed on investigating the neurocognitive mechanisms involved in action observation, often working with sensorimotor experts (i.e. professional dancers). She employs neuroimaging methods such as fMRI, EEG or TMS. Current lines of research focus on how sensorimotor experience and embodiment mechanisms participate in other visual process such as emotion perception, visual encoding and memory of actions and aesthetic experience.

Understanding Chinese jade in a world context
Feb 2 @ 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm
Understanding Chinese jade in a world context @ The British Academy | England | United Kingdom

Jades were as desirable and treasured in the ancient past as they are valuable and sought after in today’s world. However, is our focus on ‘pure jades’ obscuring knowledge of differential valuations and uses of the many rocks and minerals historically functioning as jade? Is our denigration of these substances preventing a holistic approach to the mining, production, distribution and use of jade through time? There are solid Earth science reasons governing their source locations and why certain combinations of rocks and minerals occur in the archaeological record as jade.
Speaker: Professor Gina Barnes, SOAS, University of London
Chaired by: Professor Craig Clunas FBA, University of Oxford

About the speaker:
Professor Gina Barnes is the Founder of the Society for East Asian Archaeology and author of the textbook “Archaeology of East Asia: the rise of civilization in China, Korea and Japan” among 90 other works. She is retired from lecturing at Cambridge and Durham Universities.

FREE. Registration not required. Seats allocated on a first come, first served basis

Feb
3
Fri
Life By Design
Feb 3 @ 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
Life By Design @ Hogg Lecture Theatre, University of Westminster | England | United Kingdom

How did some of the most inspiring people in architecture and design get to where they are today?

Featuring:
– Frederick Cooper Llosa (CGGMS Architects)
– Sonia Watson (Stephen Lawrence Charitable Trust)
– Chaired by Razia Iqbal (BBC News)

In celebration of Royal Gold Medal Week 2017, new and existing RIBA International and Honorary Fellows will tell a series of personal stories with architecture in these Life By Design talks across the UK, sponsored by Ibstock.

In partnership with the University of Westminster, this Life by Design event in London will see a unique line-up of speakers introduce their work and careers, followed by an “in conversation” discussion between the group and an audience Q&A.

The speakers will discuss their work, their inspiration, and the paths their careers have taken. Join us to find out how architecture has shaped their lives, what motivates them and what advice they would give to the next generation of design professionals.

Love, sex and marriage…with a robot?
Feb 3 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Love, sex and marriage...with a robot? @ The British Academy | England | United Kingdom

Designers are producing robots that are increasingly human-like in appearance and actions. From sophisticated machines we can chat to, through to lifelike sex robots, these creations have the potential to change how humans date, have sex or fall in love. But do we really want – and need – artificial companionship? Join us for an evening of activities from talks to performances, as we explore the future of romantic relationships. Programme available from January 2017.

Suitable for over 18s

FREE. Registration required

Feb
4
Sat
Pets as Therapy
Feb 4 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Pets as Therapy @ Bethlem Museum of the Mind, Bethlem Royal Hospital | England | United Kingdom

Come and meet Tess, the Siberian husky, and find out about her work at Bethlem Royal Hospital. Kate McCormack of Bethlem’s Occupational Therapy Department discusses the benefits of pet therapy.

Feb
6
Mon
Aliens Among Us w/@JMBagniewska
Feb 6 @ 7:30 pm
Aliens Among Us w/@JMBagniewska @ The Monarch | England | United Kingdom

Aliens: supremely adaptable, successful and dangerous. A tagline for a sci-fi horror? No, it’s the reality around us. Invasive alien species – species that have come, or been brought, from one part of the world to another – can pose a huge threat to our health, finances and biodiversity.

However, we can also learn a lot from them. How do we study them? What do we know about them? Can we stop the invasions? Mink, crabs, hogweed, sea squirts, parakeets, algae, giant rhubarb – the list is growing all the time.

Dr Joanna Bagniewska is a zoologist at the University of Reading specialising in behavioural ecology. In her spare time she does science stand-up comedy. She comes from Poland and is married to Batman.

Feb
7
Tue
The Course, The Arts of Christianity 5/10
Feb 7 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course, The Arts of Christianity 5/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this series of 10 lectures, Nicole Mezey will examine how no single theme has so preoccupied the western artist as has Christianity. It is the only one of the world’s great monotheistic faiths to allow, indeed to encourage, representation, and the history, narratives and practice of the Faith are richly reflected in its art. Cherubim and chasubles, Passion and pilgrimages, Samson and St. Lucy – this course explores a range of Christian themes, some of the devotional and other forms in which they were expressed, and the experiences and ideas which inspired them.

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

In this lecture, we discuss the search for order in a chaotic world – one of the great themes of the medieval world. The arts express this through themes which link Old and New Testaments, past and present, and through a terrible, continuing fascination with the end of the world and the Apocalypse itself.

 

An extensive series of unlikely doubles w/@vaughanbell
Feb 7 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
An extensive series of unlikely doubles w/@vaughanbell @ Lecture Theatre LG01, Professor Stuart Hall Building, Goldsmiths, University of London | England | United Kingdom

An extensive series of unlikely doubles: a ‘big data’ approach to Capgras delusion

Capgras delusion, typically described as a belief that a family member or relative has been replaced by an identical looking imposter, is considered rare and the vast majority of cases have been reported as single cases in the literature. Using a large clinical records database of a South London mental health trust we used a high specificity search strategy and identified 84 cases of Capgras delusion and were able to profile demographics, symptom phenomenology, cognition and neuroimaging to varying degrees in the sample. As it presents clinically, Capgras delusion seems to be found across a large number of ethnic groups, does not clearly reflect right-hemisphere pathology as cited in the literature and has a diverse symptom phenomenology that is not reflected in typical definitions.

Biography
Dr Vaughan Bell is a Senior Clinical Lecturer at the UCL Division of Psychiatry and a clinical psychologist in the South London and Maudsley NHS Trust.

Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit Invited Speaker Series
http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/speakers/

Mariner: Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the Voyage of Faith
Feb 7 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Mariner: Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the Voyage of Faith @ St Paul's Cathedral | England | United Kingdom

Coleridge is, famously, one of the great Romantic poets, a group renowned for their wild lives and living outside respectable society. A brilliant and innovative poet, Coleridge was also, perhaps surprisingly, a man of profound faith and insight into the Christian life.

Malcolm Guite, poet, priest and academic, has written a new biography telling the life of the poet through the lens of his great poem The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. Written when Coleridge was just 25, it traces a journey which begins in high hopes and good spirits, leads to an intense encounter with human fallibility, fear and loneliness, before coming home to a renewal of faith and vocation. It is however much more than an individual’s story: it is a profound exploration of the human condition itself. Malcolm Guite will explore Coleridge’s life, faith, and poetry and bring him into fresh light as a subtle, surprising and profound theologian.

Malcolm Guite is a poet, theologian and song-writer. He teaches in the Divinity Faculty at the University of Cambridge and is Chaplain of Girton College,Cambridge. He also lectures widely in England and North American on theology and literature, has published poetry, theology and literary criticism and worked as a librettist. His latest book is Mariner: A Voyage with Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Hodder 2017).

Feb
9
Thu
The Course, Ceramics – Masters and Makers 5/5
Feb 9 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course, Ceramics – Masters and Makers 5/5 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

Ceramics has been important in European culture for both utilitarian and artistic purposes. This 5 part series looks at materials and techniques over the last 500 years and explores some of the key aspects of production in the history of European culture – tin glazed wares produced in Italy during the C16th, the pioneering development of factories at Meissen, Sevres and Wedgwood and the explosion of production and creativity that occurred in C19th Britain.

Opportunities for collecting ceramic pieces will be highlighted

ARTS & CRAFTS AND STUDIO POTTERY

In this lecture, the development of the arts and crafts movement in the second half of the 19th century will  be explored and its huge repercussions for ceramic making in Britain. It will also examine the development of the art pottery movement with reference to William de Morgan, William Moorcroft, Edmund Elton and Doulton & Company. It will also examine the development of the related 20th century studio pottery movement and its legacy.

 

 

Amygdala oscillations and Zygomaticus activations: What is it about music?
Feb 9 @ 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Amygdala oscillations and Zygomaticus activations: What is it about music? @ RHB 110 (Cinema), Richard Hoggart Building, Goldsmiths, University of London | England | United Kingdom

From goosebumps to tears to breaking into a smile, music has the remarkable ability to work on our emotions and give us pleasure. About 20 years worth of neuroimaging evidence confirms that the brain networks implicated in emotion and pleasure in several sensory domains are also observable when we listen to music. But a musical piece is not a fearful face or a delicious meal and the challenge remains to understand how sequences of auditory events with no immediately obvious adaptive value can have the effect they do.

In this talk, I will present work that uses depth electrode recordings to examine the neural mechanisms underlying the processing of some of music’s fundamental building blocks. I will then present data showing that music listening episodes tend to be punctuated by discrete moments of heightened physiological and emotional arousal in the listener. Finally, I will propose a framework for investigating “what it is about music” that builds on current understanding of the role of the dopaminergic mesolimbic system in both cognition and affect.

Biography
Diana Omigie studied Neuroscience at University College London before completing her MSc and PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London. Following her doctoral work she carried out research fellowships and postdocs in the USA and France and is currently a post-doctoral fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics in Frankfurt, Germany. Her current research activities revolve around investigations into music induced emotion and pleasure.