Jun
11
Mon
Summer in the medicinal garden: A series of afternoons exploring medical plants and herbal medicines
Jun 11 @ 1:30 pm – Sep 10 @ 6:00 pm
Summer in the medicinal garden: A series of afternoons exploring medical plants and herbal medicines @ Royal College of Physicians | England | United Kingdom

Join the Royal College of Physicians in their medicinal garden for a series of three afternoons exploring medical plants and herbal remedies past and present, celebrating the College’s 500th anniversary.

World renowned experts deliver talks on themes as diverse as plants in anaesthesia, the 400th birthday of one of Britain’s most influential book of medicines, poisons in the works of Agatha Christie, addictive herbs and modern food supplements.

With themed lectures, an expert-led garden tour and refreshments included each afternoon, there can be no better way to discover one of London’s most fascinating botanical gems this summer.

All events cost just £10 and are sure to sell out quickly. Reserve your place now using the links below.

Monday, 11 June 2018

A history of plants in anaesthesia by Dr David Wilkinson, former consultant anaesthetist, St Bartholomew’s Hospital and ‘Unicorn Horn and London Treacle’ a celebration of the 400th birthday of the publication of Pharmacopeia Londinensis by Tony Cartwright, retired pharmaceutical regulatory consultant.

Tickets for this event also include admission to the Poynter Lecture of the British Society for the History of Medicine at 6pm: ‘The Doctor as Collector’ by Dr Simon Chaplin, Director of Culture and Society at the Wellcome Trust. For details of the Poytner Lecture, click here

Click here for more information and to book your place for this event.

Monday, 16 July 2018

Plants poison in the works of Agatha Christie, by Dr Kathryn Harkup, author of ‘A is for Arsenic: the poisons of Agatha Christie’ and a study of addictive substances derived from plants, from alcohol to morphine and cocaine, by Professor Graham Foster, Royal College of Physicians Garden Fellow and Professor of Hepatology.

Click here for more information and to book your place for this event.

Monday, 10 September 2018

‘Neutraceuticals’, Professor Ruth Andrew of the University of Edinburgh examines plant-based supplements and fortified food, and ‘Oranges and Lemons’ the true story of citrus fruits in scurvy told by Dr Henry Oakeley, Royal College of Physicians Garden Fellow and retired consultant psychiatrist.

Click here for more information and to book your place for this event.

Programme

1.30pm    Registration with refreshments
2pm         First lecture
3pm         Tea and coffee with garden tours of relevant plants by Royal College Garden Fellows
4pm         Second lecture
5pm         Drinks reception
6pm         Event finishes

 

Jul
29
Sun
Turning The Tide On Plastic
Jul 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Turning The Tide On Plastic @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom
Sunday 29th July @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Event Navigation

 BOOK NOW

At the current rate pieces of plastic will outnumber fish in the ocean by 2050. That is the legacy we are leaving our children and grandchildren.

Plastic flows into our lives from every direction and most of it is not recycled. Instead it is incinerated or ends up in landfill, where it will sit for hundreds of years, or enters the world’s seas where it fragments into tiny pieces to become microplastics – the environmental scourge of our times.

Many of us had assumed that governments, brands and waste authorities were dealing with plastic on our behalf. But the impact of shows such as Blue Planet along with national beach cleans and high-profile campaigns have resulted in a collective wake-up call.

Journalist, broadcaster and eco lifestyle expert Lucy Siegle provides a powerful call to arms to end the plastic pandemic along with the tools we need to make decisive change. It is a clear-eyed, authoritative and accessible guide to help us to take decisive and effective personal action.

When it comes to single-use plastics, we are habitual users, reaching out for plastic water bottles, disposable coffee cups, plastic straws and carrier bags multiple times a day. If only 12 of us adopt Lucy’s ‘reduce, rethink, refill, refuse’ approach, we could potentially ditch 3K-15K single items of plastic in a year. When we consider our power as influencers – whether at school, the hairdressers, at work or on the bus – we suddenly become part of something significant.

So now is the time to speak up, take action and demand the change you want to see in the ocean, in the supermarket aisles and on the streets. It’s time to turn the tide on plastic, and this talk will help show you how.

Jul
30
Mon
Porphyry’s Letter to Marcella – a guide to the inner and outer life
Jul 30 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Porphyry’s philosophical letter to his wife Marcella is an extraordinary work which offers a range of profound and valuable reflections on living a philosophical life, as well as telling us much about women’s involvement in philosophy. Porphyry wrote this letter to his wife while he was away undertaking important business for the Greeks and, within the letter, he encourages her to be philosophically independent and self-sufficient. Porphyry also draws on Diotima’s speech (in Plato’s Symposium) to encourage Marcella to see philosophy as a path of ascent to the gods. He reflects on what we are as human beings and how we can live the best life possible, even under difficult or challenging circumstances. Exploring the relationship between the soul and the body, the roles of the virtues or excellences in human life, and the nature of reality itself, Porphyry offers Marcella – and his reader in a wider sense – intimate personal reflections and advice on living a philosophical way of life, including how to overcome and move beyond obstacles, distractions and difficulties. We will read an extract from the Letter to Marcella and consider the philosophical way of life encouraged and advised by Porphyry.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Aug
1
Wed
When prophecy fails… again
Aug 1 @ 7:30 pm

The End of the World is announced almost monthly. We remember the dire warnings at the Millennium, and the Mayan calendar of 2012, while the Second Coming of Jesus has been a regular event for centuries. The Maitreya was meant to appear in the East End of London, and our Space Brothers were coming to save the elect in their flying saucers…

These prophecies all have one thing in common. Alternative religions author Dr David V Barrett looks at prophecies of the end of the world and at how prophets cover their embarrassment when nothing happens… again.

Sep
5
Wed
The psychology of conspiracy theories
Sep 5 @ 7:30 pm

Was 9/11 an inside job?  Is climate change a hoax?  Was Princess Diana murdered?  Millions of people appear to think so, disbelieving official explanations for significant events in favour of alternative accounts that are often called ‘conspiracy theories’.  In recent years, psychologists have begun to investigate what makes conspiracy theories appealing to so many people.  In this talk, I will broadly overview what psychologists have found out so far, and will discuss some of my own findings on the causes and consequences of conspiracy theory belief.

Karen Douglas is a Professor in Social Psychology at the University of Kent.  In addition to conducting work on the psychology of conspiracy theories, she is involved in projects examining sexism in language, the influence of sexist ideology on attitudes toward pregnant women, and the psychology of internet behaviour.

Sep
11
Tue
After Man: A Zoology of the Future
Sep 11 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
After Man: A Zoology of the Future @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

What would life on earth look like in 50 million years; long after the extinction of humanity?

Join Dougal Dixon, palaeontologist, geologist and author, in conversation with vertebrate palaeontologist and science writer Darren Naish to mark the return of Dixon’s astonishing speculative-evolution book ‘After Man: A Zoology of the Future’.

Dougal imagined and beautifully illustrated this new world and its creatures in his 1981 book ‘After Man’ and brought to life the wondrous predatory mole-beasts the Desert Sharks, the mega-penguin Vortex, rodent wolf Falanx and the flightless and terrifying bat descendant the Night Stalker.

Setting his scenario in the distant future, about 50 million years from now, he has given the members of his new animal kingdom time to undergo dramatic changes in structure and behaviour. But in doing this he has never allowed himself to become too outlandish in his invention. He has created his fauna of the future so painstakingly that each kind of animal teaches us an important lesson about the known processes of past evolution. By introducing us to fictitious examples of these factual processes, his book is not only great fun to read, but also has real scientific value
From the introduction by Desmond Morris

Dougal Dixon graduated Bachelor of Science in geology from The University of St Andrews in 1970 and Master of Science in 1972. He is a full-time writer and book editor specializing in the earth sciences including After Man: a zoology of the future, The New Dinosaurs, in which he described the zoogeography of the world by describing what life might be like today had the dinosaurs not become extinct and Greenworld in which human impact on natural ecosystems is examined by following the history of human colonization of a lush and habitable alien planet.

Darren Naish is a British vertebrate palaeontologist and science writer. He obtained a geology degree at the University of Southampton and studied vertebrate palaeontology under British palaeontologist David Martill at the University of Portsmouth. He is founder of the blog Tetrapod Zoology, created in 2006.

Copies of ‘After Man: A Zoology of the Future’ will be on sale on the night via the publisher Breakdown Press.

Sep
19
Wed
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Imperial London) 1/10
Sep 19 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Imperial London) 1/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Imperial London

 

In this lecture we will see how at the turn of the 20th Century, London was capital to the world’s largest Empire. This Imperial self-confidence, soon to be dented by the Great War, manifested itself most fully in the Jubilee for Queen Victoria and a ceremonial refashioning of key areas of central London.

Sep
20
Thu
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Dress in Shakespeare’s Time) 1/3
Sep 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Dress in Shakespeare's Time) 1/3 @ The Course at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 3 part series, you will from shimmering silks and sumptuous satins, glittering gold brocade to sheer muslin gowns,  how artists through the ages have revelled in depicting details of dress.  Whether clinging to every contour or concealing the shape of the wearer, clothing can create dynamism and drama – stories that contemporaries could read. Through the words of key dramatists and writers, and portraits in paint and print, this course will investigate how character can be created through clothing.

“Pins and Poking Sticks”: Dress in Shakespeare’s Time

“God has given you one face and you make yourself another” says Hamlet – condemning the use of make-up, and the fine line between “art” and “artifice”.  With a focus on the heavily “painted” face of Elizabeth 1 (whom Spenser termed the “Faerie Queene”) we will consider the words of moralists, playwrights, painters and poets as they created impossible images of ageless.

Sep
24
Mon
The Course / History of German Art (Tilman Riemenschneider) 1/9
Sep 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Tilman Riemenschneider) 1/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Tilman Riemenschneider (c. 1460 – 1531)

The first lecture will look at Tilman Riemenschneider whose precise record is not known but he was probably born around 1460 at Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld in present-day Thuringia. Principally a wood carver, we will look at the materials he used and how he came to the trade of sculpting and woodcarving, examine his arrival in Würzburg (at 18) and his itinerant lifestyle. There is scant evidence of this life but we will look at the likely contact and influence of another German artist on his work – Martin Schöngauer, on whose copper engravings he later based his wood carvings.

Sep
27
Thu
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Jane Austen’s World) 2/3
Sep 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Jane Austen's World) 2/3 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 3 part series, you will from shimmering silks and sumptuous satins, glittering gold brocade to sheer muslin gowns,  how artists through the ages have revelled in depicting details of dress.  Whether clinging to every contour or concealing the shape of the wearer, clothing can create dynamism and drama – stories that contemporaries could read. Through the words of key dramatists and writers, and portraits in paint and print, this course will investigate how character can be created through clothing.

Men in Black, Women in White?  Jane Austen’s World

In the BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy certainly made a “splash” in his crisp linen shirt (who could forget the scene as he emerged from the lake)?  In an earlier era, Lawrence Olivier cut a dash with Greer Garson on the silver screen.  To what extent did these adaptations really reflect the clothing and culture of Jane Austen’s world, or merely the worlds in which they were made?

Oct
2
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Martin Schöngauer) 2/9
Oct 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Martin Schöngauer) 2/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Martin Schöngauer (active 1469; died 1491)

The second lecture in this series will look at Martin Schöngauer who like many Italian Renaissance artists had a background in the goldsmith trade, influenced by his father the goldsmith Caspar Schöngauer. Although there is no precise recording of when he was born it is believed to be in Colmar in 1469. He was known as an engraver and we will look at his most famous works along with his paintings and those of his workshop, examining the dissemination of these and their wider impact on German art.

Oct
3
Wed
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Philanthropy) 2/10
Oct 3 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Philanthropy) 2/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Philanthropy

Paradoxically, the Imperial city was also home to a huge impoverished population, one which caused both concern and fear among the ruling classes. The Philanthropic movements, beginning in the late 19th century, sought to bring a healthier life both morally and physically, to the population of the city, and their activities were re-focused and expanded by the newly formed London County Council.

Hypnosis: the state of the science
Oct 3 @ 7:30 pm

Hypnosis is a valuable method for studying different facets of conscious awareness yet it continues to be one of the most misrepresented and misunderstood phenomena in psychology. Here I will dispel widespread myths and misconceptions about hypnosis and describe what psychologists, neuroscientists, and clinicians have learned about this fascinating phenomenon.

Devin Terhune is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London where he studies conscious awareness and its top-down regulation. His primary interests concern the neurocognitive basis of time perception and individual differences in hypnotic suggestibility.

Oct
4
Thu
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (The Age of Dickens) 3/3
Oct 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (The Age of Dickens) 3/3 @ The Course at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this three part series, you will see from shimmering silks and sumptuous satins, glittering gold brocade to sheer muslin gowns, how artists through the ages have revelled in depicting details of dress.  Whether clinging to every contour or concealing the shape of the wearer, clothing can create dynamism and drama – stories that contemporaries could read. Through the words of key dramatists and writers, and portraits in paint and print, this course will investigate how character can be created through clothing.

Corsets & Crinolines:  The Age of Dickens

In the Victorian age the line between “gentleman” and “gent” was finely drawn (Charles Dickens was the latter – as could be discerned from his rather flash waistcoats).  The language of clothing was vital to Dickens and his readers to denote his varied characters who could “splash the cash” or be “ever so humble”.  His contemporary Thomas Hardy, and painters Frith, Rossetti, Millais (and many more) will help us to shed light on the colourful, crinoline era.

Oct
11
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (The Art of the Court) 1/7
Oct 11 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (The Art of the Court) 1/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

The Art of the Court: palaces, temples & shrines

Heian Culture, Buddhism and Shinto Arts
Festivals and observances.

Oct
16
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Albrecht Dürer) 3/9
Oct 16 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Albrecht Dürer) 3/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528)

Here we will explore the early life and works of this precocious youth who was born in Nuremberg in 1471 and examine the enduring influence he had on the Italian Renaissance, not to mention what the Italian Renaissance had on him. The map of Europe was determined by the Holy Roman Empire and the countries we know today were groups of city states which shared aspects of language and culture. Trade between them allowed the spread of goods and ideas to flourish. He was one of the very first artists to write about himself and left a vast body of autobiographical writings, convinced that posterity would be interested in him. He wrote extensively on art practice including treatises on measurement and human proportion in order to educate future German artists because he was determined to counter the view that Germans were “a race of savage drunkards from a wild country with a poor climate, responsible for the destruction of ancient Rome”.

Oct
17
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Interwar Anxiety and Development) 3/10
Oct 17 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Interwar Anxiety and Development) 3/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Interwar Anxiety and Development

The period between the wars saw the city and the country confronted with a series of problems, partly addressed through new institutions or the reformulation of older ones. It was the period of the “Homes for Heroes”, of the development of the BBC and of the London Underground.

Oct
18
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Samurai Culture) 2/7
Oct 18 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Samurai Culture) 2/7 @ The Course at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Samurai Culture: martial arts & fine arts

Medieval society, Bushido, swords, painting & calligraphy
The artisan class, crafts & innovations.

Oct
23
Tue
The Course / The History of German Art (Lucas Cranach the Elder) 4/9
Oct 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of German Art (Lucas Cranach the Elder) 4/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553)

Cranach was one of the leading German painters and printmakers of the early 16th century with an incredibly successful workshop. He was the Elector of Saxony’s court painter and the official portraitist of Martin Luther, as well as the Reformation’s chief artist. We will examine Cranach’s output, style of painting and how that style changed as he became more involved with the cause of the Reformation. His altarpieces, Lutheran subject pictures, portraits, as well as mythological works and nudes will all be studied. We will also investigate the success of Cranach among Humanist scholars, rulers, religious leaders and the controversy that still surrounds some of his works.

Oct
25
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art and Modern Culture (Architecture and Gardens) 3/7
Oct 25 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art and Modern Culture (Architecture and Gardens) 3/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Architecture & Gardens: villas, tea houses & modern Style

In this lecture, you will see how Japanese space & contemporary tea houses
Influenced Frank Lloyd Wright, Le Corbusier, Bauhaus

Oct
30
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Hans Holbein the Younger) 5/9
Oct 30 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Hans Holbein the Younger) 5/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Hans Holbein the Younger

Hans Holbein was born in c.1497-8 in Augsburg and was taught by his father, Hans Holbein the Elder. Recommended to the court of Henry VIII by the humanist Erasmus Deriderius, he spent two periods of his life in England (1526-8 and 1532-43), portraying the nobility of the Tudor court. We will look at his work including his most famous portraits, Henry VIII and “The Ambassadors”. The latter, an enigmatic full-length double portrait is a political statement as much as a record of two friends (Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve, the Bishop of Lavaur) at a time of turmoil and upheaval (1533) when Henry VIII was seeking to divorce Catherine of Aragon in order to re-marry Anne Boleyn.

Nov
1
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Costume & Textile) 4/7
Nov 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (Costume & Textile) 4/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Costume & Textiles: development of kimono

In this lecture we will look at Theatre costumes, Crafting the Kimono
Modern day Kimono style

Nov
6
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Adam Elsheimer) 6/9
Nov 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Adam Elsheimer) 6/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Adam Elsheimer (1578-1610)

This painter is often left out of the historical canon of art history or when included is often difficult to place. Adam Elsheimer was born and trained in Frankfurt and almost exclusively worked on a small scale and painted in oil on copper. We will look at his visits to Munich, Venice and Rome and although his output was small, we will look at the influence of these works on more wellknown artists (Rubens, Rembrandt and Claude) and the influence of Renaissance Venetian artists on him (Tintoretto and Veronese). We will also concentrate on his landscapes, religious works and dynamic compositions as well as the spectacular lighting effects that he learned from the work of those Venetian artists

Nov
7
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Moderns and Anti-Moderns) 4/10
Nov 7 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Moderns and Anti-Moderns) 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Moderns and Anti-Moderns

Perhaps because of its size, perhaps because of something conservative in the English character, London didn’t embrace very fully the art and architecture of the modern movement. Despite this, the Interwar period saw a flowering of arts, particularly literature, in the city, which reflected and contributed to wider currents elsewhere.

Do no harm. But first, “nature.” – w/@NaturoDiaries
Nov 7 @ 7:30 pm

Naturopaths have defined their brand of medicine using a set of “healing” principles that sound pleasant, but really describe an archaic and sometimes twisted understanding of medicine. Having been a former naturopathic “doctor,” I can say that the overwhelming majority of naturopathic care relies extensively on dubious alternative therapies, rather than established protocols based on medical and scientific research. When it comes to naturopathy, “nature” always trumps the oath to do no harm. Join former naturopathic doctor Britt Hermes for a deconstruction of naturopathy’s defining principles and what to do about the growing trend of natural medicine.

Britt Hermes is a writer, scientist, and a former naturopathic doctor. She practiced as a licensed naturopath in the United States for three years and then left the profession after realizing naturopathy is a pseudoscientific ideology. Since this time, Britt has been working to understand and communicate how she was tricked by alternative medicine, so others do not repeat her mistake. She now writes to expose issues with naturopathy, the current rising profession in alternative medicine. Her work focuses on the deceptions naturopathic practitioners employ to scam patients and contrive legitimacy in political arenas. Britt’s writings can be found at Forbes, Science 2.0, KevinMD, and Science-Based Medicine. She hopes her stories will protect patients from the false beliefs and bogus treatments sold by alternative medicine practitioners.