May
29
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 5/10
May 29 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

The Work-life Balance Tips towards Destiny and Departure (iv)

The menace of Rumour is abroad. Jupiter sends Mercury to tell Aeneas his duty is to leave Carthage for Italy. Aeneas braces himself to break the news to Dido, whose nightmares now resolve her to die. Mercury visits Aeneas in a dream: he must go now to save his life and those of his companions. Claude is at the scene, as are Dossi, Giacquinto, Manetti, Reni, Tiepolo and Turner.

May
30
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Yellow) 5/10
May 30 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Yellow) 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Richard le Gallienne

“till one comes to think of it, one hardly realizes how important and pleasant things in life are yellow”

Yellow is associated with peace and knowledge in India. But how did it go from being the Imperial colour for the Chinese to a symbol of notoriety in late C19th Europe? Discover the range of yellows from the Indian yellow made from the urine of cows fed only on mango leaves and water to the chrome of Van Gogh’s sunflowers. And learn why Kandinsky included it in his key colours and one of today’s most influential installation artists, Olafur Eliasson, uses it in his practice.

Jun
2
Sun
Thinking on Sunday: Who Owns England?
Jun 2 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Thinking on Sunday: Who Owns England? @ Conway Hall

How we lost our green and pleasant land, and how to take it back.

For centuries, England’s elite have covered up how they got their hands on millions of acres of our land, by constructing walls, burying surveys and more recently, sheltering behind offshore shell companies. But with the dawn of digital mapping and the Freedom of Information Act, it’s becoming increasingly difficult for them to hide.

Trespassing through tightly-guarded country estates, ecologically ravaged grouse moors and empty Mayfair mansions, writer and activist Guy Shrubsole has uncovered a wealth of never-before-seen information about the people who own our land, to create the most comprehensive map of ownership in England that has ever been made public.

From secret military islands to tunnels deep beneath London, Shrubsole unearths truths concealed since the Domesday Book about who is really in charge of this country – at a time when Brexit is meant to be returning sovereignty to the people. Melding history, politics and polemic, he vividly demonstrates how taking control of land ownership is key to tackling everything from the housing crisis to climate change – and even halting the erosion of our very democracy.

An inspiring manifesto for how to open up our countryside once more, it is time expose the truth and take back our green and pleasant land.

Guy Shrubsole works as a campaigner for Friends of the Earth and has written for numerous publications including the Guardian and New Statesman. In 2016 he started his blog Who Owns England.

Jun
3
Mon
Plotinus on Beauty 2nd of 2 evening sessions
Jun 3 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plotinus, one of the sages of the Platonic tradition wrote two treatises that explored Beauty (Ennead I, 6 – On Beauty & Ennead V, 8 – On the Intelligible Beauty). This is the second of two evenings (20th May and 3rd June – we will begin this second one with a summary of the main points of the first one) where we plan to look at passages from these treatises, and explore some of Plotinus’ questions and themes – What is Beauty? What is the relation of beauty to virtue? How are we to participate in it? How does beauty manifest at different levels? The god-like contemplation of the inner Beauty of the Intelligible world.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

 

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

“No eye ever saw the sun without becoming sun-like, nor can a soul see beauty without becoming beautiful.”

Jun
4
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vasari and Michelangelo) 4/8
Jun 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vasari and Michelangelo) 4/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Giorgio Vasari and ‘The Divine Michelangelo’

The Signature Projects and their critical reception (1494-1564)

In his time, Michelangelo was the most written about artist and also the first to have literature published about him in his own lifetime. We will look at the uneasy relationship between Michelangelo, the artist and Giorgio Vasari, the art historian, as well as others who wrote about him. How did such adulation affect him and his work? We will also look at the development of the man through his most iconic works and evaluate their criticism through writing that survives and is still in publication.

Jun
5
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 6/10
Jun 5 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 6/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

As the Fleet Sails, so Dido’s Pyre is set alight (iv; v)

Dido immolates herself. At sea, Aeneas and his crew look back, see the fire, but do not realize why it is burning. A storm drives them to Sicily, where they visit the tomb of Aeneas’s father Anchises and stage memorial games: sea-racing, athletics, boxing, archery, horsemanship. Trojan women fire the ships. Bourdon, Cayot, Coypel, Fuseli, Guercino, Reynolds, Robson, Rubens, Sacchi, Tiepolo.

…Quack quack here: Pseudoscience in veterinary practice (w/ Dr. Danny Chambers @DannyVet)
Jun 5 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

You may be surprised to hear that the anti-vaccination movement is not restricted to human medicine – animal owners are increasingly turning their back on conventional medicine and seeking out unproven alternatives such as homeopathy or chiropractic – often at the detriment of their animal’s health. You might be even more surprised to learn about the myriad other forms of pseudoscience animals are subjected to, including the common practice of ‘horse psychics’. Danny Chambers will discuss the use of pseudoscience encountered in veterinary practice, and the implications this has on both animal and human health and wellbeing.

Danny grew up on a farm in Devon, graduated from Liverpool Vet School, and has written about and campaigned against the use of pseudoscience in veterinary practice for several years. He was described as the ‘veterinary Ben Goldacre’ at two different conferences recently.

Danny has a particular interest in the concept of ‘One Health’ – the recognition that human and animal health is interlinked, and as a result he has worked on veterinary projects that benefit both human and animal health in India, Iraq, Morocco and The Gambia.

He enjoys mountain biking (badly) and playing the guitar (badly).

Danny occasionally writes for New Scientist magazine.

Twitter – @DannyVet

Instagram – @danny_the_vet

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Jun
6
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (White) 6/10
Jun 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (White) 6/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

White Kandinsky

“White has the appeal of the nothingness that is before birth of the world in the ice age”

We may not consider white a colour now, but it wasn’t always so. The Ancient Romans had two words for it: albus and candidus. Trace the history of lead, zinc, and lime whites, and consider their changing symbolism. How did it come to be associated with authority? Why were polychromed Greek sculptures scrubbed in the C18th? Who were the C19th ‘white painters’? From unicorns to Korean porcelain to Whistler’s women to Agnes Martin’s minimalism to the French performance artist who covered an apartment in toothpaste, discover the enduring appeal of white.

Jun
11
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Caravaggio and Bernini) 5/8
Jun 11 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Caravaggio and Bernini) 5/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

The Rise and Fall in Critical Favour of Caravaggio and Bernini

Taste and the invention of Baroque/An Age of Conspicuous Consumption (1577 – 1680)

What is Baroque and why did it fall so heavily out of favour; a position from which it has, arguably, never recovered? This session will look at Baroque through the prism of two of the most influential Italian artists – Caravaggio and Bernini. It will also look at their most iconic works, their lives and how their works were received within their lifetime and in the decades following their deaths.

Jun
12
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 7/10
Jun 12 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 7/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Aeneas and the Sibyl: Destination Underworld (v; vi)

Aeneas’s beloved helmsman Palinurus is drowned by the god Sleep. They land at Cumae, Aeneas consults the Sibyl, is guided to the golden bough, finds the door to the Underworld, crosses the River Styx, and meets Palinurus’s ghost and the three-headed dog Cerberus. Burne-jones, Crespi, Domenichino, Guercino, Hollar, Houbraken, Michelangelo, Rubens, Testa, Turner, van Swanenburg, Edder.

Jun
13
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Purple) 7/10
Jun 13 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Purple) 7/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Purple Monet

“I have finally discovered the true colour of the atmosphere. It’s violet. Fresh air is violet”

So expensive, it was a subject of sumptuary laws and mostly restricted to imperial or royal families, purple has a history that stretches back to Antiquity. Plato mentioned it in his Symposium as the greatest hue of all. The 1890s were called ‘the mauve decade’ when the first synthetic dye was made. But many purples were mixed from reds and blues and, often, faded reds have left only blue paint behind. Discover the true purples in works by Gossaert and Renoir; see how fashion changed forever; and why Monet (and Elizabeth Taylor) fell in love with violet.

20
Jun
2019
Jun
17
Mon
The experience of self in Plato’s Phaedrus – a reading and discussion
Jun 17 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

What is a human being?

To understand the nature of anything there are some basic questions which should be explored:

What are its causes? What is its history? What drives its activities? What potential does it possess? What is its ultimate goal?

So the opening line of Plato’s Phaedrus, “Where are you going, my dear Phaedrus, and from whence came you?” is a strong hint that the dialogue is going to offer the reader a chance to examine some fundamental issues of selfhood. And so it turns out: its sixty or so pages not only present us with the widest possible frame in which to view our human nature and experience, but it is packed with extraordinary subtle insights. We will read some extracts from the dialogue and explore some of these fundamental questions.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £2-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Jun
18
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vermeer) 6/8
Jun 18 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vermeer) 6/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Fame, Bankruptcy and Critical Revival

Vermeer the Sphinx of Delft (1632 – 1675)

For an artist who died bankrupt in 1675 leaving enormous debts, Vermeer has become one of the most highly prized artists in the world. This lecture will look at his rise as an artist in the Dutch town of Delft, his training and influences, how and why he made his pictures and what they might mean. Could these factors have an impact on why he was described in his lifetime as “the excellent and famous Vermeer”? The story of Vermeer will take us right into the 20th century to help us understand the enduring appeal of this artist.

Jun
19
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 8/10
Jun 19 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 8/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Even More Momentous Ghosts Now Cross his Path (vi)

In Limbo, Aeneas sees and speaks to Dido. She walks away wordlessly. He meets his comrade-in-arms Deiphobus; is shown the terrors of Tartarus but cannot enter; comes to idyllic Elysium, where his father Anchises prophesies Rome’s future. Then, out through the gate, he returns to the world. Jan Breughel the Elder and Younger, Croce, Dantan, Manfredi and The Master of the Aeneid.

Jun
20
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Orange) 8/10
Jun 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Orange) 8/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Orange Vincent Van Gogh

“There is no blue without yellow and without orange”

A special colour in Buddhist art, till the C16th, orange was referred to as ‘yellow-red’ or ‘saffron.’ But a deep orange chromium from a Siberian mineral was discovered in the C18th. Before that, orange the colour was popular with the sophisticated Ferrara Renaissance painters such as Garofalo and Dosso Dossi. Explore how orange became a fashionable colour from princely orangeries through Frederic Leighton’s Flaming June, Winslow Homer’s and Toulouse-Lautrec’s works.

Jun
25
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Hogarth) 7/8
Jun 25 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Hogarth) 7/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Hogarth and the Art of the Conversation Piece and Social Commentary

The impact of Criticism on the work of William Hogarth (1697-1764)

Hogarth is rightly acknowledged to be one of the best loved British artists, but in his day, this was not the case. We will look at the impact of criticism on Hogarth’s work through the pictures which Hogarth referred to as conversation pieces. The lecture will highlight both the positives and negatives which were seen by many as a social commentary while also looking at Hogarth’s own prejudices and how they impacted on his work.

Jun
26
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 9/10
Jun 26 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 9/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

The Landing in Italy, a Latin War, and a Shield from Vulcan (vii, viii, ix)

They pass Circe’s island, reach the Tiber’s mouth, and send an embassy to King Latinus, who offers Aeneas his daughter Lavinia in marriage. Juno and the Fury Allecto goad the Latins, led by Turnus, to war with the Trojans. Aeneas is divinely inspired to seek allies. The Trojan camp is invaded. Bourgeois, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Claude, de Lairesse, del Po, Desprez, Regnault, Serrur, Solimena.

Jun
27
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Black) 9/10
Jun 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Black) 9/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Black Hans Arp

“The black grows deeper and deeper darker and darker before me. It menaces me like a black gullet. I can bear it no longer. It is monstrous. It is unfathomable”

One of the most difficult colours to paint with, see how masters such as Frans Hals, Caravaggio, Degas, Goya, Manet, Robert Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, and more succeeded in using black. What did Malevich mean by his iconic ‘Black Square’? How is bone black made? From the drawings of Aubrey Beardsley to the fashions of Coco Chanel, to Picasso’s ‘Guernica,’ and the innovations of Anish Kapoor, see this colour in all its manifestations.

Jul
1
Mon
Platonic Education in the Phaedrus – reading and discussion
Jul 1 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plato’s understanding of the nature of education is one of the truly liberating doctrines of the ancient world – and one which is largely neglected in modern times to detriment of the individual and global society. “All learning is reminiscence” is its keynote – and Plato explores this starting point as the necessary outcome of conceiving the self to be a soul which has descended into its present embodied form full of innate reasons or ideas. For him and those philosophers who followed the Platonic path, our experiences in the material world are reminders of the great eternal ideas upon which the whole of manifested reality is based; education is the process by which the latent ideas within the self are drawn out into full consciousness and thence into creative activity. We will explore this understanding using passages from the Phaedrus as our starting point. 

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £2-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Jul
2
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis 8/8
Jul 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis 8/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

A Catalyst for Change in Art Appreciation

From Pre-Raphaelitism & Ruskin to Impressionism, Modernity & Roger Fry (1848 – 1910)

Revolutionary iconoclasts or traditionalist in disguise? The artists in this final session seem hell-bent on causing offence and to be deliberately counter-culture just for the sake of it. Was this in reality their modus operandi or was there more to it? This session looks at two different approaches to modernity from both sides of the Chanel which changed the course of art history forever. In England, we will look at the Pre-Raphaelites and their relationship with John Ruskin and on the French side of the Chanel, the Impressionists and their critical reception. In both cases, the role of the critic, be it supportive or not, was crucial in establishing the reputation of these groups of artists. This session will also explore the tensions between artists and critics in what would become known as modern painting.

Jul
3
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 10/10
Jul 3 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 10/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Aeneas Breaks a Siege and Faces Single Combat (x, xi, xii; the Aeneid’s legacy)

On the battlefield, Evander’s son Pallas is lost to Turnus’s spear. Aeneas kills several Latin chiefs. A truce allows the dead to be buried. Then, in renewed fighting, the Latins lose ground. Aeneas and Turnus meet face to face. Aeneas triumphs. The Aeneid is complete. But what is its legacy to poetry and art? Bazin, Cugnot, Dimier, Falguiere, Giordano, Perrin, and surprise ‘guests’.

Maths, murder, and malaria (w/ Dr. Steven Le Comber @le_comber)
Jul 3 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Geographic profiling (GP) is a statistical technique originally developed in criminology to prioritise large lists of suspects – often in the tens or hundreds of thousands – in cases of serial murder. GP uses the spatial locations of crime sites to make inferences about the location of the offender’s ‘anchor point’ (usually a home, but sometimes a workplace). The success of GP in criminology has led recently to its application to biology, notably animal foraging (where it can be used to find animal nests or roosts using the locations of foraging sites as input), epidemiology (identifying disease sources from the addresses of infected individuals) and invasive species biology (using current locations to identify source populations). In a talk spanning mathematics, Jack the Ripper and great white sharks, Steve will explain how he used geographic profiling to investigate the identity of the artist Banksy and reanalysed a Gestapo case from the 1940s that formed the basis of a famous novel – and how GP can be used to control outbreaks of diseases such as malaria.

Steven Le Comber is a senior lecturer in the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary University of London. His work covers a wide range of subjects within evolutionary biology, including mathematical and computer models of molecular evolution and studies of spatial patterns in biology. Steve’s work on the mathematics of spatial patterns ranges from the fractal geometry of African mole-rat burrows to epidemiology.

Steve is passionate about science communication, and has given major talks at the Cheltenham Science Festival in the UK, at the Internet Festival in Pisa, Italy and at Ratio in Bulgaria. He has appeared on the BBC and his research has been covered around the world.

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

 

Jul
4
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Brown) 10/10
Jul 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Brown) 10/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Brown Georgia O’Keeffe (Visit to the National Gallery)

“All the earth colours of the painter’s palette are out there in the many miles of badlands”

The earth pigments are some of the oldest to be used in art, evident in the Cave painters. There are many natural (raw umber, raw sienna) and human-made (burnt umber, burnt sienna) variations. Their versatility, stability, and affordability mean we can enjoy them in the great landscape painters, Dutch and Flemish genre painters like Joachim Beuckelaer, Velázquez, Van Dyck, and masters like Rembrandt who eschewed more expensive pigments in their search for truth. This gallery visit will also be an opportunity to revise our other colours by comparing them ‘in the flesh.’

Jul
10
Wed
A Deadly Potion: John Snow and the Fight Against Cholera
Jul 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Cholera outbreak report 1855

Cholera outbreak report 1855

A Royal College of Surgeons event at the London Metropolitan Archives.

When cholera arrived in London in 1831 it spread fast. Doctor John Snow, member of the Royal College of Surgeons and pioneer of anaesthetics, worked out how to stop the disease but his ideas proved too revolutionary for the times.

Speaker: Sandra Hempel

Jul
24
Wed
The Politics of American Conspiracy Theories (w/ Prof. Joe Uscinski)
Jul 24 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

NB: Please be aware that this Greenwich Skeptics in the Pub talk is not held at its usual time of the first Wednesday of the month.

Particularly since 2016, conspiracy theories became a mainstay of American political debate. Not only did conspiracy theories affect major political decisions (i.e., the election of Trump), but conspiracy theories have become the currency of mainstream political debate. Why has this happened, and what are the measurable effects? What are the dangers of this turn toward dark and disturbing narratives? Professor Uscinski will bring to bear a wealth of polling data from the US to explain how, when, and why conspiracy theories will affect political debate and decision-making. The surprising findings address the following questions: Who believes in conspiracy theories and why? Why are some conspiracy theories more popular than others? What are the dangers of conspiracy theories? Are conspiracy theorists prone to violence? How did conspiracy theories affect the 2016 and 2018 elections? What can conspiracy theories in the United States tell us about conspiracy theories in the United Kingdom?

Joseph Uscinski is associate professor of political science at University of Miami in Coral Gables, FL. He is co-author of American Conspiracy Theories (Oxford, 2014) and editor of Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them (Oxford, 2018).

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/