Nov
21
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (War & Destruction) 5/10
Nov 21 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (War & Destruction) 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

 

War and Destruction

An enduring image of the Second World War is the dome of St Paul’s Cathedral shrouded in smoke: London Can Take It. However, the war was traumatic and the effect on London’s citizens and buildings has been somewhat hidden behind an image of the Dunkirk spirit. It did, however, produce a number of visionary schemes to re-shape the city to better suit the modern world.

Nov
22
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art and Culture (Japan’s Post-Modernist Style) 7/7
Nov 22 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art and Culture (Japan's Post-Modernist Style) 7/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

Japan’s Post-Modernist Style

In this lecture,  you will explore Fashion, Film, Manga, and Cosplay
and the new culture of “Hyper-Japan”

Nov
27
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Adolph Menzel) 9/9
Nov 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Adolph Menzel) 9/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Adolph Menzel (1815 – 1905)

In this final lecture, we move into the late 19th century with the life and work of Adolph Menzel, a leading German artist. Born in 1815, he was first active as a printmaker, and then a draftsman, before eventually turning to oil painting after the age of 30. Nevertheless, he went on to have a prolific career. His technical virtuosity and skill at capturing the effects of real life with an almost photographic accuracy would pre-empt the work of the French Impressionism by 30 years. He would ultimately visit Paris and meet Edgar Degas, and become known as the unparalleled chronicler of Berlin life.

How to increase the value of eyewitness evidence (w/ Prof. Laura Mickes)
Nov 27 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

To inform a criminal investigation, police may ask an eyewitness to that crime to try to identify the perpetrator from a lineup. Eyewitnesses, however, have a bad reputation for being unreliable. That reputation is due to, in part, the fact that eyewitness researchers once viewed the relationship between the accuracy of an eyewitness’s initial identification and the confidence expressed in that identification as weak. Lab-based and field studies alike show that identifications made with high confidence are highly accurate whereas identifications made with low confidence are much less so. Confidence expressed during the initial procedure is therefore diagnostic of accuracy. In fact, it is by far the best predictor of accuracy. And when taken into account, the data challenge the longstanding notion that eyewitnesses are unreliable. The data also provide a way for the criminal justice system to improve the probative value of eyewitness evidence.

Laura Mickes is a Professor in the Department of Psychology at Royal Holloway, University of London. Her research interests mainly involve the theoretical understanding of memory and decision-making and applied aspects of memory and decision-making (e.g., investigating and improving eyewitness identifications). More details can be found at her lab website http://www.mickeslab.com.

This event is jointly hosted with Goldsmiths’ Forensic Psychology Unit.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Dec
1
Sat
Strange December Book Fair: UFOs, Ghosts, Zombies and Much More
Dec 1 @ 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Strange December Book Fair: UFOs, Ghosts, Zombies and Much More @ Backyard Bar and Kitchen | England | United Kingdom

Christmas should be stranger. Join London Fortean Society for an afternoon of talks on ghosts, UFO art, voodoo, the world’s first amphibious baby and much more. There will be book sales, stalls pizza and beer to mark the darkening days before Yule.

Speakers include:

David Clarke – In the Eye of the Beholder: UFO Artwork
Richard MacLean Smith of the Unexplained Podcast
Susan Owens – The Appearance of Ghosts
John Cussans – Bond’s Black Ops: Graham Greene, Papa Doc and Loa OS 22
Thomas Morris – The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth and Other Curiosities

Stall to be confirmed

Dr David Clarke – In the Eye of the Beholder: UFO Artwork

Dr David Clarke from Sheffield Hallam University’s Centre for Contemporary Legend will talk about his book UFO Drawings at The National Archives. He will look at the myriad ways in which people have depicted strange phenomena in the sky, from the earliest times to the drawings, paintings and other artwork that was submitted to the former Ministry of Defence UFO desk that closed in 2009.

Richard MacLean Smith of the Unexplained Podcast

Part Scottish, part English and proud citizen of nowhere, Richard Maclean Smith researches, writes and produces the podcast Unexplained, described by the Guardian as the ‘spookiest podcast ever.’
An international success, Unexplained has been #2 in the US, UK and Canadian iTunes chart. Unexplained is The Examined Life meets The X Files. He has a new book out on 25th October.

Dr. Susan Owens – The Appearance of Ghosts: shrouds, sheets or see-through?

The idea that the dead can return to haunt the living is deeply rooted in the British imagination, and ghosts are central to countless plays and paintings, stories and ballads, photographs and films. But why has the appearance and behaviour of ghosts in art and literature altered over time? When did they stop wearing shrouds and put on white sheets or become see-through? And what do these changes reveal about them – and us?

Dr. Susan Owens, former Curator of Paintings at the Victoria and Albert Museum, is the author of The Ghost: A Cultural History.

Bond’s Black Ops – Graham Greene, Papa Doc and Loa OS 22

John Cussans, author of ‘Undead Uprising: Haiti, Horror and the Zombie Complex’ examines the story of Papa Doc, François Duvalier: President of Haiti from 1957 to 1971, emulated the Vodou loa of the dead Baron Samedi, a tale first promoted by Graham Greene that finds an uncanny precedent in Ian Flemming’s 1954 novel Live and Let Die.

Thomas Morris – Diagnosis: Unexplained
Early medical journals contain numerous cases which appear inexplicable to modern science. One Victorian patient apparently had an entire family of slugs living in her stomach; another started to emit urine from her eyes, ears and even her navel. Thomas Morris examines some of the strangest tales ever reported in the medical literature, from exploding teeth to the world’s first amphibious baby.

Dec
4
Tue
How the world thinks (w/ Dr. Julian Baggini @microphilosophy)
Dec 4 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

In his latest book, Dr Julian Baggini explores key concepts in the world’s philosophical tradition. In this talk, he will argue that a lot of apparently outdated, pre-scientific metaphysics actually provides useful and insightful ways of understanding the world. Ideas concerning time, qi, yin yang, emptiness and such can be understood as tools of phenomenological metaphysics, not proto-science.

Dr Julian Baggini is the author, co-author or editor of over 20 books including The Virtues of the Table, The Ego TrickFreedom Regained and, most recently, How The World Thinks (all Granta). He was the founding editor of The Philosophers’ Magazine and has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, as well as for the think tanks The Institute of Public Policy Research, Demos and Counterpoint. He has also appeared as a character in two Alexander McCall-Smith novels. His website is www.microphilosophy.net.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Dec
5
Wed
Game AI Unleashed! QMUL Computer Science Christmas Lecture
Dec 5 @ 5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

 

 

 

 

 

Game AI Unleashed! Wed 5 Dec 2018
with Simon Colton, Raluca Gaina, Simon Lucas, Vanessa Volz
FREE (attendance is free but please register in advance)
5-7.30pm
Doors: 5pm, lecture 5:30-6:30pm, drinks and mince pies afterwards
The Great Hall (People’s Palace, map), QMUL
Transport: Stepney Green tube, 25/205 buses stop nearby
What3Words: trio.exit.stars
More info and tickets: http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/gameai
Flyer (PDF): IET-QMUL Christmas Lecture 2018

Games have always pushed the boundaries of AI since the dawn of the field in the 50s and 60s.

For many decades the main challenge was to make AI that would be super-human at even the most demanding games. The initial focus was on classic games like Chess and Go, but AI researchers are now tackling something even tougher: Video Games like StarCraft and DOTA 2, and making more general AI that can learn to play any game. We’re also making AI that creates new games and new game content, and then hands over to some AI friends to test them!

Join us to learn more about this fascinating field and also play some new games we guarantee you will not have played before.

Will they be any good? Come and decide for yourselves.

Doors open at 5pm for a 5:30pm start.
Ends 6:30pm followed by drinks and mince pies.
Attendance is free, but please register in advance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speakers

Simon Colton
I’m a professor of Computational Creativity at Queen Mary University of London and Monash University in Australia. I look at what it means for software to be genuinely creative in arts and science projects, and what benefits for society this could bring. I’ve been involved in projects where AI systems have made mathematical discoveries; painted pictures for international exhibitions; invented ideas for a West-end musical; and generated whole new videogames.We’ve used these creative AI systems to help us understand the philosophical nature of creativity itself and to enable and empower people to be creative, for instance by democratising game design – so that anyone and everyone can make videogames, with a bit of help from an AI co-creator!

Raluca Gaina
I am a research student in Game AI at Queen Mary University of London and part of the Intelligent Games and Games Intelligence (IGGI) programme, having recently completed an internship at Microsoft Research. My work is focused on developing AI based on evolutionary methods, that is capable of better planning and decision making in any games, even those it hasn’t seen before and knows nothing about. This allows for easy and flexible game testing, as well as smarter opponents for interesting gameplay.

Simon Lucas
I am a professor of AI at Queen Mary University of London and also the director of the Game AI Research Group. My research involves developing powerful AI that learns to play new games, providing a diverse supply of AI opponents and tireless play-testers. Real-world problems can also be modelled as games, and we can then use this general AI to help solve them or at least provide fresh insights, and help to make the world a better place.

Vanessa Volz
I am a research associate at Queen Mary University of London and working in the area of Game AI. I have developed an algorithm that is able to optimise a problem, even though the outcome of its solutions are uncertain. This is important for game-related problems, as most games contain random elements. Additionally, players change their behaviour and seldom make the same mistakes twice. I have used this algorithm to help generate decks in card games as well as levels for platformers, for instance.

The target audience is mainly family’s with secondary children but all are welcome and we will have an exhibition following the talk along with refreshments. This is a great opportunity to learn about Game AI and see some demonstrations.

More info and tickets: http://www.eecs.qmul.ac.uk/gameai

 

How cartoons somehow or other get drawn – w/@Banxcartoons
Dec 5 @ 7:30 pm

Jeremy Banx, an award winning cartoonist, will talk about his work – and some of his original cartoons will be available for purchase at very reasonable prices (just in time for Christmas!).

He has contributed to newspapers, magazines and comics including Private Eye, Wall Street Journal, Punch, New Statesman, Vice.uk, Oink!, Toxic, etc. For the past twenty-five years he has been the pocket cartoonist for the Financial Times. He is the cartoon editor for The Reaper at www.thereaper.rip

His books include ‘Cubes’, ‘The Many Deaths of Norman Spittal’, ‘Big Fat Sleepy Cat’, ‘The Dewsburys’ and ‘Frankenthing’. More than 150 short animated films were based on his character Norman Spittal.

For ten years he contributed designs for floats to the Nice Carnival.

He lives and works in Greenwich, London, with his wife Elaine and has four children.

The Derby winning thoroughbred racehorse, Dr Devious, was named after one of his characters.

Dec
11
Tue
Risky Business: Why the Parole Board Releases Bad People (w/ Emma McClure)
Dec 11 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

The Parole Board turned 50 in 2017 but it has recently found itself the subject of high profile stories about what appear to be dangerous and risky decisions to release high profile prisoners convicted of the most serious of crimes. Is this a new issue? How are these decisions made and how on earth can murderers, robbers or rapists ever be safely released to the community? What are the tools to achieve this and how much can Parole assessments be relied upon to predict risk?

In this talk prison lawyer Emma lays out how the Parole Board operates in practice; the way risk assessments are conducted and the problems that exist in the current system in trying to make evidence-based decisions and the management of society’s most dangerous people within a problem-ridden criminal justice system.

Emma is a solicitor specialising in representing prisoners and mental health patients. She regularly appears before the Parole Board and Mental Health Tribunal. She is also a public speaker interested in the intersection between the pursuit of justice and critical thinking. (Photo credit: Richard Cooper)

This event is jointly hosted with Goldsmiths’ Forensic Psychology Unit.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Dec
17
Mon
Dec 17 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plato’s Republic is an extend meditation on Justice and our relation to it: for Plato the good life is the just life. As Socrates says at the end of the dialogue, we should consider how life is arranged and “having an eye to the nature of the soul, to comprehend both the worse and the better life, pronouncing that to be the worse which shall lead the soul to become more unjust, and that to be the better life which shall lead it to become more just, and to dismiss every other consideration.”

Is this emphatic emphasis on justice reasonable? And, if so, how can we recognize justice, and cultivate it within ourselves?

We’ll read passages from the Republic and other dialogues where the issue is explored and discuss the validity of this view, and its implications.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Jan
8
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Introduction and the Middle Ages) 1/10
Jan 8 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Introduction and the Middle Ages) 1/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this series of 10, we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

Introduction and the Middle Ages

“An Englishman’s home is his castle” but some “castles” are rather finer and more comfortable than others. We begin with an overview of our theme, exploring how the evolution of our domestic spaces serves changing life-styles before considering the castles, monasteries, halls and huts of the Middle Ages.

Jan
9
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (The Festival Style) 6/10
Jan 9 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (The Festival Style) 6/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Building a Better Tomorrow: The Festival Style

The shock of the second war had repercussions in a variety of ways: it brought the end of Empire, the beginning of mass immigration and optimistic new social institutions, such as the NHS. This optimism, nurtured in a time of rationing, is best summarised by the 1951 Festival of Britain.

What every parent needs to know about Steiner schools – w/@lecanardnoir
Jan 9 @ 7:30 pm

The last decade has seen several ‘new religious movements’ create publicly funded Free Schools. Maharishi and Steiner Schools are perhaps the most prominent. It is timely to look closely at the origins and beliefs of Rudolf Steiner, the founder of the occult movement of Anthroposophy. Steiner was a mystic who believed he had direct clairvoyant access to cosmic knowledge. As such he developed an esoteric belief system based on karma, reincarnation, astrology, homeopathy and gnomes. His visions gave insights into architecture, art, dance, agriculture, medicine, education, science and diet. His racial hierarchy of spiritual development resonated in Germany in the early 20th Century turning a personal belief into a worldwide movement. Today we find hundreds of anthroposophically inspired organisations in the UK alone: everything from Steiner Schools, Biodynamic farms to banks, pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies, charities and cheese makers.

Andy Lewis has been trying to lift the veil on the inner secrets of the movement and will discuss how this secretive movement has direct impact on public life.

 

Jan
10
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Introduction 1/8
Jan 10 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Introduction 1/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

Introduction to the Decorative Arts

The word “decorative” is usually associated with functional objects like tea pots; but if such objects are functional, how can they be purely “decorative”? Is not a painting, which has no other function than to decorate a room, more “decorative” than an object that is used? The first lecture in this series will look at the background to the development of the notions of “fine”, “decorative” and “applied” art.

Jan
15
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Exile and Splendour) 2/10
Jan 15 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Exile and Splendour) 2/10 @ The COurse at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this series of 10, we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

Exile and Splendour

The triumphant return of the Tudors in 1485 brought with it the Renaissance. We look at the Continental buildings that court and monarchy aspired to emulate and how and why this changed expectations at home. And why are staircases so significant?

Justice delayed or justice denied? Investigating non-recent sexual allegations (w/ Gary Pankhurst)
Jan 15 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

Sexual crime remains a matter of deep public concern and has received considerable scrutiny over the years. A pivotal event was the unprecedented reporting of sexual allegations that followed a TV documentary in October 2012 about the late Jimmy Savile leading to the Metropolitan Police forming Operation Yewtree. This talk seeks to place these events in context, to understand the factors that can impact upon the investigation and how it continues to shape the police approach to allegations reported sometimes years after the events. These types of allegation will always raise strong opinions among commentators. Some believe that such a serious crime as child abuse should always go before the courts regardless of time passed. There are others who state it is an affront to natural justice and that such prosecutions are unsafe. We will explore whether delays in reporting can secure safe and ethical prosecutions or inevitably lead to justice denied for the accused or the complainant.

Gary is currently a PhD Candidate at Newcastle University, having recently retired (2015) after completing a 30-year career with the Metropolitan Police. He worked as a Detective on major and complex crime investigations both within the UK and overseas. He has specific expertise in the investigation of sexual offences and offences against children. He worked on many high profile investigations including the Jimmy Savile Enquiry (Operation Yewtree) working as the interview adviser and case officer for a number of the widely reported cases.

He has an operational and academic interest in the structure and conduct of investigative interviews with witnesses and suspects. He is a member of the International Investigative Interviewing Research Group (iIIRG) and is researching the elicitation of information in interviews with suspected sex offenders.

This event is jointly hosted with Goldsmiths’ Forensic Psychology Unit.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Jan
17
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500 – 2000) Renaissance 2/8
Jan 17 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500 - 2000) Renaissance 2/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

The Decorative Arts in the Renaissance

The Renaissance is famous for its painters and sculptors but its craftsmen are often forgotten. This lecture will focus on the masterpieces of furniture, metalwork and tapestry that furnished the rooms of Renaissance princes and nobles, exploring the contexts that gave them meaning as well as the materials and techniques that gave them form.

Jan
22
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Fixtures and Fittings) 3/10
Jan 22 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Fixtures and Fittings) 3/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this series of 10, we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

Fixtures and Fittings

The later 16th century saw a real improvement in living standards across the country. We see not only the houses of the wealthy but the changing expectations of the merchant class, and the objects and furniture with which they adorned their homes. Outdoors, for the first time, we see the birth of interest in gardens, highly controlled and in tune with the indoor style of the age.

Jan
23
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Designs for Living) 7/10
Jan 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Designs for Living) 7/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.Designs for Living

In the longer post-war period a tougher future emerged. Britain confronted the loss of its historic pre-eminence by trying to embrace the ‘White Heat of Technology’ (London was briefly swinging) before the 1970s brought a new sense of realism about the city’s place in the world.

Jan
24
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Baroque 3/8
Jan 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Baroque 3/8 @ The Coure at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

Furniture in the Baroque Age

Furniture came into its own in the seventeenth century when the tradition of cabinetmaking got underway. New types of object reflect dramatically changing life styles; the furnishing of private rooms, for instance, was unprecedented. And exotic materials, such as ebony and turtleshell, reflect Europeans ambitions with regard to the New World.

Jan
29
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Dynasties in Transition) 4/10
Jan 29 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Dynasties in Transition) 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

In this series of 10, we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.Dynasties in Transition

Dynasties in Transition

Elizabeth I cannily spent much of her time as house guest of her greatest nobles and it was therefore these, rather than the monarch, who were responsible for the most sumptuous buildings of her reign. Before a Civil War put it all under threat, new comforts and sophistication become apparent in silver furniture, the work of foreign artists such as Anthony van Dyck and the plant collections and garden designs of two generations of John Tradescants.

Pseudoscience, public health and the justice system (w/ Pamela Radcliffe)
Jan 29 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

This talk presents an overview of pseudoscience within therapeutic contexts in the twenty-first century, juxtaposed with the risks posed to public health and the criminal justice system. It identifies the adverse outcomes that may arise from specific psychotherapeutic treatments and popular pseudo-scientific beliefs. The justice response and published cases are briefly explored. This talk concludes by advancing the case for increased therapeutic regulation and justice safeguards.

Pamela Radcliffe is a senior barrister, Lead Editor of Witness Testimony in Sexual Cases: Evidential, Investigative, and Scientific Perspectives, OUP (2016), and Visiting Research Fellow at Portsmouth University, Psychology Department.

Called to the Bar in 1979, Pamela’s legal practice has spanned all aspects of family and criminal law (defending). She conducts independent case reviews and has assisted university innocence networks where miscarriages of justice are alleged or suspected. Pamela’s academic interest lies in the interdisciplinary nature of the law, and the nexus between medicine, psychology and law, especially the justice challenges posed by non-recent sexual complaints and controversial psychotherapeutic treatments. Pamela delivers lectures and workshops to universities and to justice and health professionals on witness testimony related issues.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Jan
31
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Silver 4/8
Jan 31 @ 12:45 pm – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Silver 4/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

The Art and Craft of the Silversmith

Because the very materials of gold and silver were used as currency for much of their history, the status of goldsmiths was always high and their products were often splendid. But precisely because silver objects were often regarded as a form of money, they were frequently melted down in times of need. The legacy of goldsmiths throughout the ages is intertwined with the history of aristocratic taste and patronage.

Feb
5
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Privacy and Palladianism) 5/10
Feb 5 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Privacy and Palladianism) 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this series of 10, when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

 

Privacy and Palladianism

The great Palladian houses of the 18th century represent a revolution in lifestyle as much as in architecture. Graceful and essentially rural, they combine elegance with the possibility of intimacy, comfort with a managed offer of sophisticated activities. Against a background of upheaval in France and the agricultural revolution in England, the revolution in gardening is no less profound – from geometry to the “natural” landscapes of Capability Brown.

Torture – Does it work and can it ever be justified? (w/ Jo Kenrick)
Feb 5 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

What if there was a dirty bomb hidden somewhere in the UK and you had to get a suspect to tell you where it was and how to disable it, what lengths would you go to? Recent revelations in the media about the UK government’s role in cooperating with the CIA torture programme have re-opened the debate on what is and is not acceptable when innocent lives are at stake. The President of the United States has declared that torture ‘absolutely works’ but the CIA’s own reports state that torture techniques “do not produce intelligence” and “will probably result in false answers”. This talk examines the ethical arguments for and against torture and reviews the science behind what techniques do and don’t work in eliciting information in high-pressure situations.

Jo Kenrick is a member of the Forensic Psychology Unit and an Associate Lecturer at Goldsmiths where she is researching the development of deceptive skill for her PhD. She has a wide range of research interests as you can see by her previous dissertation topics  –“Let the traffic policeman wear black cotton gloves”: Why traditional rituals of death matter to modern people (BA, Religious Studies), One born every minute: A target selection hypothesis of deception abilities in Machiavellian personalities (BSc, Psychology) and The influence of information channels on attributions for Domestic Violence against Women in Sweden, Bulgaria and the UK (MSc, Research Methods).

This event is jointly hosted with Goldsmiths’ Forensic Psychology Unit.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/