Sep
19
Wed
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Imperial London) 1/10
Sep 19 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Imperial London) 1/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Imperial London

 

In this lecture we will see how at the turn of the 20th Century, London was capital to the world’s largest Empire. This Imperial self-confidence, soon to be dented by the Great War, manifested itself most fully in the Jubilee for Queen Victoria and a ceremonial refashioning of key areas of central London.

Painting, Patronage and Politics under the Tudors by Professor Simon Thurley
Sep 19 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Painting, Patronage and Politics under the Tudors by Professor Simon Thurley @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Tudor England was a dangerous place for the wealthy and powerful. Art and architecture was a sign of connoisseurship but also political ambition. The cultural ambitions of the Tudor elite open a window into contemporary attitudes to religion, international relations and politics and illuminate the rise and fall of the century’s great patrons.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Sep
20
Thu
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Dress in Shakespeare’s Time) 1/3
Sep 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Dress in Shakespeare's Time) 1/3 @ The Course at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 3 part series, you will from shimmering silks and sumptuous satins, glittering gold brocade to sheer muslin gowns,  how artists through the ages have revelled in depicting details of dress.  Whether clinging to every contour or concealing the shape of the wearer, clothing can create dynamism and drama – stories that contemporaries could read. Through the words of key dramatists and writers, and portraits in paint and print, this course will investigate how character can be created through clothing.

“Pins and Poking Sticks”: Dress in Shakespeare’s Time

“God has given you one face and you make yourself another” says Hamlet – condemning the use of make-up, and the fine line between “art” and “artifice”.  With a focus on the heavily “painted” face of Elizabeth 1 (whom Spenser termed the “Faerie Queene”) we will consider the words of moralists, playwrights, painters and poets as they created impossible images of ageless.

Sep
24
Mon
The Course / History of German Art (Tilman Riemenschneider) 1/9
Sep 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Tilman Riemenschneider) 1/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Tilman Riemenschneider (c. 1460 – 1531)

The first lecture will look at Tilman Riemenschneider whose precise record is not known but he was probably born around 1460 at Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld in present-day Thuringia. Principally a wood carver, we will look at the materials he used and how he came to the trade of sculpting and woodcarving, examine his arrival in Würzburg (at 18) and his itinerant lifestyle. There is scant evidence of this life but we will look at the likely contact and influence of another German artist on his work – Martin Schöngauer, on whose copper engravings he later based his wood carvings.

Gothic London: Recreating the Ancient City on Screen by Professor Ian Christie
Sep 24 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Gothic London: Recreating the Ancient City on Screen by Professor Ian Christie @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

The earliest London-made films showed the Victorian city doing everyday business, before its fictional screen image became increasingly shadowy and sinister. Gothic or ‘gaslight’ visions of London have remained popular with cinema audiences, providing a fictional and often eerie counterpoint to the growth of the modern city.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Sep
25
Tue
Antibiotic Resistance: Calling on Citizens to Help Tackle the Problem by Professor Jacqueline McGlade
Sep 25 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Antibiotic Resistance: Calling on Citizens to Help Tackle the Problem by Professor Jacqueline McGlade @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Antibiotic resistance has emerged as an issue that threatens public health around the world. Even simple operations may no longer be possible due to the risk of lethal infection. What is less well-known is the role of environmental components in amplifying resistance. Heads of State have pledged to tackle the problem but current policies are proving inadequate. A shift in thinking is needed with citizen scientists getting involved and prevention the best cure.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Sep
27
Thu
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Jane Austen’s World) 2/3
Sep 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (Jane Austen's World) 2/3 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 3 part series, you will from shimmering silks and sumptuous satins, glittering gold brocade to sheer muslin gowns,  how artists through the ages have revelled in depicting details of dress.  Whether clinging to every contour or concealing the shape of the wearer, clothing can create dynamism and drama – stories that contemporaries could read. Through the words of key dramatists and writers, and portraits in paint and print, this course will investigate how character can be created through clothing.

Men in Black, Women in White?  Jane Austen’s World

In the BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy certainly made a “splash” in his crisp linen shirt (who could forget the scene as he emerged from the lake)?  In an earlier era, Lawrence Olivier cut a dash with Greer Garson on the silver screen.  To what extent did these adaptations really reflect the clothing and culture of Jane Austen’s world, or merely the worlds in which they were made?

How to be an Atheist in Medieval Europe by Professor Alec Ryrie
Sep 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
How to be an Atheist in Medieval Europe by Professor Alec Ryrie @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

There was no intellectually sophisticated or articulate ‘atheism’ in the Middle Ages, but there was plenty of raw scepticism and incredulity. Church courts regularly heard blasphemy cases which went as far as outright denial of God.

This lecture will take a tour of medieval unbelief, showing how and why some medieval people defied the powerful orthodoxies of their day: fired not by intellectual or philosophical doubts but by suspicion that ‘God’ was being used to swindle and manipulate them.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Founding Bloomsbury Publishing: The Inside Story
Sep 27 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Founding Bloomsbury Publishing: The Inside Story @ Bloomsbury Publishing | England | United Kingdom

Step inside Bloomsbury Publishing as we reveal the origins of a publishing company.

Join us on Thursday, September 27th as we go all the way back to the beginning with three of the four original members of Bloomsbury to learn how it all began and discover what aspiring publishers today could learn from their experiences (if anything!).

We’re delighted to present an evening at Bloomsbury with Nigel Newton, David Reynolds and Liz Calder as they talk about those earliest days at Bloomsbury, the highest highs to the deepest lows and back again, with Daily Telegraph columnist and Bloomsbury author, Mick Brown, who was there at the beginning too.

In 1986, Nigel Newton had the idea to start Bloomsbury. He gathered three literary pioneers, first David Reynolds and then Liz Calder and Alan Wherry, to start Bloomsbury Publishing together with a notion to publish outstanding literary fiction and non-fiction for wide audiences.

Fast forward thirty-two years to 2018 and Bloomsbury is a thriving independent publishing house which publishes 2,500 titles annually and is the home of some of the world’s most exciting authors, acclaimed digital resources and the best academic writing. It has nearly 700 staff, annual sales of £163,000,000 and offices in London, New York, Oxford, Haywards Heath, Sydney and New Delhi.

Leading the way in publishing innovation, excellence and entrepreneurialism, Bloomsbury has made its name over the past three decades as a dynamic company, owned by the public, including its own readers, authors and staff, through pension funds with its shares listed on the London Stock Exchange.

But how did it all begin? If they were to start up in 2018, what would Bloomsbury Publishing look like? Should others follow a similar path?

Oct
1
Mon
The Gods of the Platonic Tradition – 2
Oct 1 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

The second of three evenings exploring the nature of the Gods as understood by the Platonists of the ancient world.

The Platonic tradition (which properly speaking should be seen as predating Plato himself) is an identifiable set of general ideas and practices which were handed on from one generation to the next for well over a thousand years, and which only ceased as the primary western philosophic teaching when the Christian Church established itself in a position of enforceable dominance in the late Roman Empire. The tradition was rooted in a pagan veneration of polytheistic Gods, while at the same time it recognized a singular First Principle – a transcending First God. How are we to understand this theological framework, so strange to the modern mind? Is a recognition of the Gods an optional extra in Platonic philosophy – an element we can eliminate without damage to its metaphysical and ethical structures? In what way do the mythological tales of Gods and heroes both reveal and obscure the part played by the Gods in Platonic philosophy? Can we look behind the vivid and beautiful stories and find the truths which so inspired the sages of the ancient tradition?

In a series of three linked evenings we will look at number of passages from the writings of some of the finest thinkers of the tradition with a view to seeing again the world with their eyes – perhaps to the point at which we can say with them “all things are full of the Gods.” Each of the three evenings will begin with a short introduction to an aspect of the subject and then move on to the extracts to be read: we should have at least an hour to discuss the ideas arising from these passages.

In this second evening we’ll look at the depiction of the Gods in the myths of ancient Greece and explore the relationship between the metaphysics and mythology of the Gods. We will begin with a brief summary of the main points of the previous session’s explorations.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Oct
2
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Martin Schöngauer) 2/9
Oct 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Martin Schöngauer) 2/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Martin Schöngauer (active 1469; died 1491)

The second lecture in this series will look at Martin Schöngauer who like many Italian Renaissance artists had a background in the goldsmith trade, influenced by his father the goldsmith Caspar Schöngauer. Although there is no precise recording of when he was born it is believed to be in Colmar in 1469. He was known as an engraver and we will look at his most famous works along with his paintings and those of his workshop, examining the dissemination of these and their wider impact on German art.

The Age of Unreason: Index on Censorship autumn magazine launch
Oct 2 @ 6:30 pm – 9:00 pm
The Age of Unreason: Index on Censorship autumn magazine launch @ The Royal Institution | England | United Kingdom

Join Index, BBC Radio 4’s FutureProofing series presenter Timandra Harkness and special guests to take on these questions at The Royal Institution.

We will be asking what happens when powerful people like President Trump and Philippines President Duterte embrace falsehoods and decry facts as lies. Are we now living in a world where reason is being trumped by emotion and where scientific research is dismissed because it doesn’t fit with the public’s gut feelings? Or do we just need to argue differently and learn how to persuade?

Using footage of real-life debates in the past and present day, Timandra Harkness and the team will run a short workshop with the audience on how to have better arguments in an age of unreason. There will also be a short panel discussion afterwards exploring science and censorship in the current global climate with an opportunity for audience Q&A.

With thanks to The Royal Institution and SAGE Publishing.

Seeking the Almas and Other Unknown Animals
Oct 2 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm
Seeking the Almas and Other Unknown Animals @ The Miller | England | United Kingdom

Richard Freeman is the Zoological Director of the Centre for Fortean Zoology. A working cryptozoologist he has hunted creatures such as the Tasmanian wolf, the yeti, the giant anaconda, the orang-pendek, the Mongolian death worm and the almasty.

In this talk he will introducing the study of mystery animals and speaking about his latest expedition, tracking the almasty: relic hominins in the mountains of Tajikistan.

The 7-foot door of the room was open an inch or two and starlight from the clear night was pouring in. At around 2.30 in the morning Adam and I heard a deep, guttural vocalisation; the nearest phonetically that I can write this is ‘bub-ub-bub-bub.’

“Did you hear that?” I whispered.

Adam nodded solemnly. Shortly after, something passed by the door, blocking out the light momentarily. Whatever it was, it stood on two legs and was large enough put the 7-foot door in the shade. It seemed to be walking along the veranda.

“Did you see that?” I asked

“Something is on the veranda,” said Adam.

Richard Freeman writing on his previous almasty expedition

Oct
3
Wed
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Philanthropy) 2/10
Oct 3 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Philanthropy) 2/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Philanthropy

Paradoxically, the Imperial city was also home to a huge impoverished population, one which caused both concern and fear among the ruling classes. The Philanthropic movements, beginning in the late 19th century, sought to bring a healthier life both morally and physically, to the population of the city, and their activities were re-focused and expanded by the newly formed London County Council.

Ultra-Compact Objects: Astronomy with Gravitational Waves by Professor Joseph Silk
Oct 3 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Ultra-Compact Objects: Astronomy with Gravitational Waves by Professor Joseph Silk @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

The most compact objects that shine in the universe are neutron stars. Black holes are even more compact objects that we view indirectly as matter accretes and heats up around them.

Professor Silk will describe the state of our knowledge of neutron stars and black holes, and how new observations of gravity waves are poised to revolutionise this field.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Purposeful Business: The Evidence and the Implementation by Professor Alex Edmans
Oct 3 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Purposeful Business: The Evidence and the Implementation by Professor Alex Edmans @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Do businesses exist to make profits, or to serve a purpose? This talk will present rigorous evidence showing there need be no trade-off between purpose and profit, contrary to conventional wisdom. It will then turn to the practical ‘so what?’. How can we embed purpose in the heart of business so that it extends far beyond a mission statement.

The talk will highlight how change cannot be piecemeal but involves holistic reform across many dimensions of a company.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Hypnosis: the state of the science
Oct 3 @ 7:30 pm

Hypnosis is a valuable method for studying different facets of conscious awareness yet it continues to be one of the most misrepresented and misunderstood phenomena in psychology. Here I will dispel widespread myths and misconceptions about hypnosis and describe what psychologists, neuroscientists, and clinicians have learned about this fascinating phenomenon.

Devin Terhune is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London where he studies conscious awareness and its top-down regulation. His primary interests concern the neurocognitive basis of time perception and individual differences in hypnotic suggestibility.

Oct
4
Thu
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (The Age of Dickens) 3/3
Oct 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Art of Dress in Literature, and Life (The Age of Dickens) 3/3 @ The Course at the University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this three part series, you will see from shimmering silks and sumptuous satins, glittering gold brocade to sheer muslin gowns, how artists through the ages have revelled in depicting details of dress.  Whether clinging to every contour or concealing the shape of the wearer, clothing can create dynamism and drama – stories that contemporaries could read. Through the words of key dramatists and writers, and portraits in paint and print, this course will investigate how character can be created through clothing.

Corsets & Crinolines:  The Age of Dickens

In the Victorian age the line between “gentleman” and “gent” was finely drawn (Charles Dickens was the latter – as could be discerned from his rather flash waistcoats).  The language of clothing was vital to Dickens and his readers to denote his varied characters who could “splash the cash” or be “ever so humble”.  His contemporary Thomas Hardy, and painters Frith, Rossetti, Millais (and many more) will help us to shed light on the colourful, crinoline era.

Ethics In and Out of the Court Room by Professor Jo Delahunty QC
Oct 4 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Ethics In and Out of the Court Room by Professor Jo Delahunty QC @ Barnard's Inn Hall | England | United Kingdom

If you are a barrister you will be asked ‘how can you act for someone who is guilty?’. This is just one of the ethical questions the Bar has to confront. Barristers have a Code of Ethics that governs the working relationship with the client, the court and colleagues but ethical dilemmas in practice are rarely straightforward.

Do we make value judgements about our client’s culpability? Does that affect how hard we fight their case? Why the answer to those questions should emphatically be ‘no’.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
8
Mon
No Listening, No Music: Why Listening Matters by Professor Tom Service
Oct 8 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
No Listening, No Music: Why Listening Matters by Professor Tom Service @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

What does it mean to listen to music? How might the concepts and practices of ‘listening’ and ‘music-making’ have first emerged in the story of human development?

We journey back in time, to the origins of human society – in the company of research like Steven Mithin’s book The Singing Neanderthals – and to the origins of our hearing, to the mechanisms of how our bodies and auditory systems are designed to receive and interpret sound waves. Our music and our listening have been in a symbiotic round-dance ever since.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
9
Tue
Can Maths Predict the Future? The Maths Behind Chaos Theory and Sudden Change by Professor Chris Budd
Oct 9 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Can Maths Predict the Future? The Maths Behind Chaos Theory and Sudden Change by Professor Chris Budd @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Since Newton, we are used to science making confident predictions about the future. For example, the motion of the planets and the times of the tides. However, some things seem very hard to predict, such as the stock market, or the weather in six months’ time.

Is this a fault in the way we model these systems, or is there a genuine limit to how far we can predict the future? One explanation comes from the theory of chaos, which illustrates why small changes now can lead to large uncertainty in the future.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Brexit: Recovery of Sovereignty or Loss of Rights? by Sir Geoffrey Nice QC
Oct 9 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Brexit: Recovery of Sovereignty or Loss of Rights? by Sir Geoffrey Nice QC @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Was Brexit (the 2016 referendum) argued on the basis of accurate information fairly presented? Slogans were, and may always be, better at gathering votes. With the reality of Brexit a few months away, a sober look at what we actually gain or lose is needed in two areas: What is sovereignty of an island like our own?

Could we draw a line round the coast line (and the Irish border) and contain and control all that is inside? And what of rights within that line? Can they all be home grown and nationally defined? Are we indeed an island?

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
10
Wed
Epidemics, Pandemics and How to Control Them by Professor Chris Whitty
Oct 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Epidemics, Pandemics and How to Control Them by Professor Chris Whitty @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Some infections come in repeated epidemic waves. Others are new and suddenly spread unexpectedly in a human population. This can be very dangerous, and is always very alarming; for example, this is the centenary of the 1918/19 influenza pandemic which killed more people than the war.

A known human threat such influenza may mutate or a new infection jump the species barrier from animals to become transmissible between humans: examples include HIV, SARS and Ebola, and the great historical example of plague. What happens then depends on the route of transmission, the infecting organism and the medical countermeasures available.

Our methods for tacking an airborne pandemic like influenza are very different from those for touch (Ebola), insect vector (Zika), water (cholera) or sexual transmission (HIV). This lecture will consider epidemics and how to tackle them.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.
Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture

Oct
11
Thu
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (The Art of the Court) 1/7
Oct 11 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Japanese Art & Modern Culture (The Art of the Court) 1/7 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

The aim of this course is to provide a contextual background to Japan’s traditional arts and crafts and to show how they have influenced Western art and developed into contemporary culture in various fields, including architecture and design, painting and printmaking, textiles, fashion and social youth culture.

The Art of the Court: palaces, temples & shrines

Heian Culture, Buddhism and Shinto Arts
Festivals and observances.

Oct
14
Sun
Undercover – The True Story of Britain’s Secret Police
Oct 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Undercover – The True Story of Britain’s Secret Police @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Investigative journalist Rob Evans discusses the secret group of police spies and the uncovering of forty years of state espionage monitoring British protest groups. They used sex, intimate relationships and drugs to build their credibility. They betrayed friends, deceived lovers, even fathered children. And their operations continue today.

This was an undercover operation so secret that some of our most senior police officers had no idea it existed. The job of the clandestine unit was to monitor British ‘subversives’ – environmental activists, anti-racist groups, animal rights campaigners.

Police stole the identities of dead people to create fake passports, driving licences and bank accounts. They then went deep undercover for years, inventing whole new lives so that they could live incognito among the people they were spying on.

They used sex, intimate relationships and drugs to build their credibility. They betrayed friends, deceived lovers, even fathered children. And their operations continue today.

Undercover reveals the truth about secret police operations – the emotional turmoil, the psychological challenges and the human cost of a lifetime of deception – and asks whether such tactics can ever be justified.

Rob Evans has been a reporter for the Guardian since 1999. With a colleague Paul Lewis, he wrote a book, Undercover, about the infiltration of undercover police officers into political groups over the past 40 years.  He is also the author of Gassed: British chemical warfare experiments on humans at Porton Down (House of Stratus, 2000). Undercover will be available on day from Newham Bookshop.