Feb
21
Wed
Asthma and Chronic Airways Disease by Christopher Whitty
Feb 21 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Asthma and Chronic Airways Disease by Christopher Whitty @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Asthma, an intermittent disease, is the commonest lung disease in the UK. The second is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), now the 4th leading cause of death globally. In both a combination of environmental and genetic factors are important, although for COPD smoking is the biggest risk factor. This lecture will consider trends and advances in these two diseases, and the chronic genetic lung disease cystic fibrosis.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Knowing me knowing you: Insight in psychiatry and medicine
Feb 21 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Knowing me knowing you: Insight in psychiatry and medicine @ Wolfson Lecture Theatre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience  | England | United Kingdom

Knowing me knowing you: Insight in psychiatry and medicine

Insight and self-awareness is Homo Sapiens’ greatest achievement. Professor David attempts to relate this to awareness and “denial” spanning general medicine, neurology and psychiatry. Is facing up to reality always better? Drawing on approaches as diverse as management theory, ethics and functional neuroimaging, this lectures illustrates psychiatry at the intersection of science and the humanities.

This prestigious lecture series will be inaugurated in February 2018 and will be held annually. A distinguished speaker will address a major theme in modern society in three integrated lectures.

Anthony David is Professor of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, NIHR Senior Investigator and Vice Dean Academic Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology & Neuroscience (IoPPN) at King’s.

Professor David qualified in medicine at Glasgow University and worked as a registrar in Neurology before taking up psychiatry training at the Maudsley Hospital in 1984.

He has been a consultant psychiatrist in the NHS since 1990. His research contributions span from schizophrenia to hysteria. He has published over 550 scientific papers and co-edited 13 books.

Professor David is a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences and the Royal Colleges of Physicians and of Psychiatrists.

Feb
22
Thu
The future of sex and sexuality in business w/@Curatorofsex
Feb 22 @ 8:00 am – 9:00 am
The future of sex and sexuality in business w/@Curatorofsex @ ?What If! Innovation Partners | England | United Kingdom

“The Curator of Sex: Why an understanding of sex and sexuality is critial for success”

Most people have little real depth of understanding when it comes to sex, sexuality and gender; yet as it becomes more and more unacceptable to not know how to speak in appropriate terms, particularly in a business setting, where should we go to ensure we are on the right side of history?

Theses topics are deeply sensitive and inherently political; engagement needs to come from within communities; therefore we all have a responsibility to occupy the role of ‘ally’, as individuals and businesses.

Join Rising Minds London and the Curator of Sex, Sarah Forbes, to delve into why an understanding of sex, sexuality and identity are so critical for the success of cultural institutions and businesses alike.

@curatorofsex
www.curatorofsex.com

Please arrive from 7:45 for breakfast and coffee – talk starts 8:15. Limited free tickets realeased 15th February 9am.

Opera (Verismo and Beyond)
Feb 22 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Opera (Verismo and Beyond) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this course we will examine the impact that Verdi and Wagner had on the opera world and the composers who attempted to emulate or follow them and lay the foundations for modern opera. We will start by looking at Verdi and Wagner’s work, examining some of the operas in detail and we will follow the continued rise in popularity of Wagner’s Ring Cycle after the composer’s death. Wagner was followed by his own son, Siegfried Wagner, who composed 18 operas most of which are unperformed today, and by Engelbert Humperdinck whose opera Hansel and Gretel remains a popular cornerstone of the repertoire. But the most successful post-Wagner composer in Germany was Richard Strauss who created a remarkable body of work moving away from Wagner. In Italy, the search for a successor to Verdi took in the Verismo operas of Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, as well as composers such as Cilea, and Giordano some of whose works still keep a toehold in the repertoire. But it was Puccini who forged his own path, writing some of the most popular operas today. There is one composer who is essential to this narrative, Debussy, and we will look at how Debussy developed his own ‘third way’.

Each lecture will concentrate on just one or two composers, and we will spend half the lecture listening to and discussing the music from one or two key operas.

Verismo and Beyond

Musical styles in Italy after Verdi were far wider than just Verismo, and a number of composers were loosely grouped together in the giovane scuola. None would achieve lasting fame except the Cilea’s Adriana Lecouvreur and Giordano’s Andrea Chenier both of which have retained a place in the repertoire.

Cryptozoology – On the track of Unknown Animals
Feb 22 @ 7:45 pm – 9:30 pm
arf!

The last thylacine?

Richard Freeman, Zoological Director of the Centre for Fortean Zoology, is one of the few professional cryptozoologists in the world, studying unknown or anomalous animals. A former zookeeper, he has worked with over 400 species of animal. He has taken expeditions across the globe in search of beasts like the orang-pedek, the Tasmanian wolf, the yeti, the giant anaconda, the Mongolian deathworm and the almasty.

Tonight he introduces the science of cryptozoology and looks at some of the unknown animals or “cryptids” with which it is concerned, focusing on his three trips to Tasmania in search of the flesh-eating marsupial known as the thylacine or Tasmanian wolf.

 

Feb
23
Fri
The Jabberwocky Puzzle
Feb 23 @ 7:00 pm

The Witzend Puzzle Collective, an international group of top puzzle designers under the leadership of Stephen Miller, have created the Jabberwocky Puzzle. The team of 15 have designed and produced sets of 13 different puzzle boxes and puzzle locks all mounted in a large puzzle chest and all themed to different elements from the Alice stories. Stephen, with a Jabberwocky Puzzle in tow, will talk about the project, its themes and tribulations

Postcards from Saturn
Feb 23 @ 7:20 pm – 8:45 pm
Postcards from Saturn @ The Royal Institution  | England | United Kingdom

Last September, the NASA/ESA Cassini-Huygens spacecraft mission ended its 20 years in space by burning up in Saturn’s atmosphere (on purpose). Hear from Michele Dougherty, one of the mission’s lead scientists, as she describes some surprising discoveries made during the orbital tour at Saturn, including water vapor plumes at the small moon Enceladus and implications this has for potential habitability.

Feb
26
Mon
The 19th Century Craze for Stereoscopic Photography by Ian Christie (@ianchris)
Feb 26 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
The 19th Century Craze for Stereoscopic Photography by Ian Christie (@ianchris) @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Stereoscopic photography rapidly became a worldwide craze after the Great Exhibition of 1851. Cheap viewers and mass-produced stereographs brought startlingly vivid images within reach of a mass audience, making this the form in which most people first encountered photography – a fact largely ignored in conventional photographic history. Like the commercial suppliers of Magic Lantern slides, stereograph publishers offered systematic coverage of many subjects, even claiming that to ‘visit’ remote countries by stereo was better than risking the journey.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

“Diotima’s path of Love in Plato’s Symposium”
Feb 26 @ 8:00 pm – 9:30 pm

In his dialogue the Symposium, Plato places one of his most important accounts of the nature of philosophy into the mouth of a woman called Diotima (whose teaching Socrates relates in his speech), who is characterised as a prophetess and priestess as well as a philosopher. Socrates relates that Diotima describes philosophy as a path of love and cognitive ascent. In this session we will consider Diotima’s speech and its implications for philosophy. Why does Diotima connect philosophy with love, desire and beauty? How does her speech relate philosophy and the search for wisdom to our relationship with other human beings and the world around us? Why does Socrates relate Diotima’s teaching rather than making his own speech on the nature of love (or erōs)? How significant is it that Plato places this teaching on the nature of philosophy in the mouth of a woman and a prophetess-priestess?

We’ll begin the evening with a short introduction to the dialogue and its themes, and then read extracts from it. We aim to have an hour after this for the group to discuss and explore the ideas which the dialogue has thrown up.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Feb
27
Tue
Inside, Outside – The World of the Artist (Ernest Meissonier)
Feb 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Inside, Outside - The World of the Artist (Ernest Meissonier) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In INSIDE, OUTSIDE, The World of the Art, Nicole Mezey will look at how creativity reflects the personal and professional experience of the artist. This series focuses on a different artist each week, looking first at the life behind their creations – the mental asylum in which Richard Dadd produced some of his greatest works, the pressure of eight children on the output of Frans Hals – before moving on to explore their work and the way it reflects that experience.

Ernest Meissonier (1815 – 1891), The Incontestable Master of our Age

Although almost forgotten today, Ernest Meissonier defies all our expectations of artistic poverty and struggle. In return for the majestic history paintings so beloved of Parisian high society, Meissonier received unprecedented prices which enabled him to live like a prince, celebrated by Napoleon III, Delacroix and Alexandre Dumas, among others, and become the epitome of celebrity and worldly success.

Shakespeare’s Politics by Sir Jonathan Bate (@provbate)
Feb 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Shakespeare’s Politics by Sir Jonathan Bate (@provbate) @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

It is well known that Shakespeare lived in an age of monarchy and wrote powerfully in his English history plays about the duties of the sovereign. In this lecture, Jonathan Bate will tell another, forgotten story: of how Shakespeare was also fascinated by Roman political models, especially the theory of civic duties expounded by Cicero, who appears as a character in Julius Caesar. He will also show how Shakespeare looked to Horace for a model of the public role of the writer.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

The restless ghost of Wroclow (w/ @jourdemayne)
Feb 27 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

In September 1591, a prosperous Wroclaw shoemaker killed himself by cutting his own throat. To avoid the shame associated with suicide and to ensure he received a religious burial, his family concealed the damning evidence.

But the shoemaker did not rest in his grave. The whole town was disturbed by his ghost which made noises, appeared to some, and oppressed others. The Council was convened and the man’s corpse was exhumed and examined; what they found shocked the whole community.

In this talk, we will conduct an historical paranormal investigation to look at the many factors which have led to perfectly sane, intelligent people coming to believe that there was a mischievous and dangerous ghost in their midst, including:

– The history of the Wroclaw and its many historical and cultural infuences

– The context of sixteenth century religious and folkloric belief

– The historic understanding of biology and bodily decay

– The social psychology of scapegoating behaviour and ritual

– The similarity between many varieties of supernatural revenant folklore across Europe, some of which persists to this day.

Deborah Hyde has been Editor-in-Chief of The Skeptic Magazine for over five years. She speaks regularly at conventions, on podcasts and on international broadcast media about why people believe in the supernatural – especially the malign supernatural – using a combination of history and psychology. She thinks that superstition and religion are natural – albeit not ideal – ways of looking at the world.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Does it matter who funds science? w/@DrAseemMalhotra @SheuliPorkess
Feb 27 @ 6:30 pm – 9:30 pm
Does it matter who funds science? w/@DrAseemMalhotra @SheuliPorkess @ Lilian Baylis Studio, Sadler's Wells Theatre | England | United Kingdom

Join us for the final event of our latest round of Future Debates, followed by networking drinks.

Two-thirds of funding UK for research comes from private companies, but only 60% of us trust scientists working for industry to follow regulations.

Many of our foods, gadgets and medicines wouldn’t exist without research funded by private companies. But controversies around secrecy in the pharmaceutical industry and health research funded by sugar companies, all leave a sour taste in the mouth.

How can we deal with these issues?

What would our world look like if businesses didn’t fund research?

Does it matter to you who pays for it?

Find out more in our animation.

Speakers:

  • Aseem Malhotra, Academy of Medical Royal Colleges
  • Tracey Brown, Sense about Science
  • Sheuli Porkess, Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry
Everything you know about genetics is wrong w/@Kat_Arney
Feb 27 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Everything you know about genetics is wrong w/@Kat_Arney @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Many of us learn about genetics in school starting with Mendel and his pea plants. We learn that one gene is linked to one trait, and one gene fault causes one disease. But the recent revolution in DNA sequencing is revealing that it’s much more complicated. People are not peas – and even peas are not peas! From strange patterns of inheritance to real life genetic superheroes living amongst us, whose DNA provides them with resilience against serious illnesses, science writer and broadcaster Dr Kat Arney explains what we do and don’t know about how our genes work.

Dr Kat Arney is an award-winning science writer, broadcaster and author. As a writer, her work has featured in the Daily Mail, the Times Educational Supplement, BBC Focus Magazine, Wired, Little Atoms, BBC Online, Guardian Online, Mosaic, the New Scientist and more. She has fronted several BBC Radio 4 science documentaries, and wrote and presented the comedy factual Radio 4 series Did the Victorians Ruin the World? with her sister, science comedian Helen Arney. Kat has written two books about genetics for the public – Herding Hemingway’s Cats: Understanding how our genes work (Bloomsbury Sigma, 2016) and How to Code a Human (Andre Deutsch, 2017).

Feb
28
Wed
Elementary Particles and Their Interactions by Joseph Silk
Feb 28 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Elementary Particles and Their Interactions by Joseph Silk @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Matter consists of a mêlée of elementary particles. There are protons and neutrons, made up of quarks, and many other short-lived massive particles. All atoms consist of protons, neutrons and an accompanying cloud of electrons – then there are electrons, muons and neutrinos, as well as the massless particles – photons. The very early universe is a unique laboratory for studying the rarest of particles. We see the faded brilliance of the fiery past, and can assemble clues that enable us to trace out the particle content of the beginning of the universe. One hope is to discover particles of dark matter, but this has so far eluded our best efforts.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Military Training in Violence, 1914 to the Present by Joanna Bourke (@bourke_joanna)
Feb 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Military Training in Violence, 1914 to the Present by Joanna Bourke (@bourke_joanna) @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

How have the British and American armed forces been taught to fight and kill in conflicts from 1914 to the present? What role have psychology and technology played in military training? How do combatants contribute to, and endure, harsh military drills? Social and cultural life in the barracks will be explored, including ‘rites of passage’ in preparing soldiers for battle.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Mar
1
Thu
Opera (Richard Strauss)
Mar 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Opera (Richard Strauss) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this course we will examine the impact that Verdi and Wagner had on the opera world and the composers who attempted to emulate or follow them and lay the foundations for modern opera. We will start by looking at Verdi and Wagner’s work, examining some of the operas in detail and we will follow the continued rise in popularity of Wagner’s Ring Cycle after the composer’s death. Wagner was followed by his own son, Siegfried Wagner, who composed 18 operas most of which are unperformed today, and by Engelbert Humperdinck whose opera Hansel and Gretel remains a popular cornerstone of the repertoire. But the most successful post-Wagner composer in Germany was Richard Strauss who created a remarkable body of work moving away from Wagner. In Italy, the search for a successor to Verdi took in the Verismo operas of Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci, as well as composers such as Cilea, and Giordano some of whose works still keep a toehold in the repertoire. But it was Puccini who forged his own path, writing some of the most popular operas today. There is one composer who is essential to this narrative, Debussy, and we will look at how Debussy developed his own ‘third way’.

Each lecture will concentrate on just one or two composers, and we will spend half the lecture listening to and discussing the music from one or two key operas.

Richard Strauss

The son of the principal horn at the Munich Court Opera, Richard Strauss heard his first Wagner operas at the age of 10. Starting out as an orchestral composer, he would develop into Germany’s leading opera composer in the early 20th century forging a strong relationship with his librettist Hugo von Hoffmanstal. We will look in detail at a pair of Strauss’s operas, Salome and Der Rosenkavalier.

Dealing with Sex Abuse: How Does the Family Court Assess Risk? – Jo Delahunty QC (@JoDQC)
Mar 1 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Dealing with Sex Abuse: How Does the Family Court Assess Risk? - Jo Delahunty QC (@JoDQC) @ Barnard's Inn Hall | England | United Kingdom

Sexual abuse is always an abuse of power. It can be opportunistic or premeditated; furtive intra-familial abuse or acts shared online. It can be multigenerational and inter-sex: grandmother to grandson; father to daughter; sibling to sibling. The victim may become an abuser. What can break the cycle? What effect do these cases have on the professionals involved? How does the family justice system confront these emotive and complex cases?

This lecture contains details that some may find distressing

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis.

Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Mar
2
Fri
The origin of life
Mar 2 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
The origin of life @ The Royal Institution  | England | United Kingdom

Dr Frankenstein aimed to create new life from inanimate parts. But how did life first arise on Earth? Phil Ball, Nick Lane and a panel of experts will discuss the latest ideas, from warm ponds to space rocks and hydrothermal vents.

Mar
3
Sat
Climate change and us: more feet, more heat?
Mar 3 @ 2:00 pm – 4:30 pm

 

Population Matters is pleased to host a timely and important public conference examining a critically neglected contributor to global warming: global population growth.

With global temperatures looking set to breach the 1.5 degree target set in the Paris Agreement, urgent action is required to minimise emissions as soon as possible. Global population is expected to rise by 2 billion people by 2050, putting nearly 30% more human carbon emitters on the planet.

Today, a UK citizen produces 70 times more CO2 than someone from Niger. Meanwhile, increasing affluence in India and China, the world’s two most populous nations, is driving their emissions upwards. Can we find sustainable solutions to climate change without tackling population growth across the globe?

Climate change and us: more feet, more heat? is an opportunity to examine the issues and consider the solutions. Join an international panel including former Guardian environment editor John Vidal, environment campaigner Sara Parkin OBE and Farah Kabir, director of Action Aid Bangladesh.

The speakers

Population Matters is bringing together a range of international experts and campaigners to discuss this vital issue and the solutions available to us.

Adrian Hayes – Record-breaking British adventurer, author, speaker, documentary presenter and sustainability campaigner.
Farah Kabir – Country director, Action Aid Bangladesh
Judy Ling Wong – President of the Black Environmental Network and Ambassador for the Women’s Environmental Network
Robin Maynard – Director of Population Matters
Sara Parkin – Principal Associate at The Sustainability Literacy Project
John Vidal – Journalist, commentator and former environment editor of The Guardian
Prof Peter Wadhams – Emeritus Professor of Ocean Physics, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge
Mar
5
Mon
Grasping Shadows: The Dark Side in Painting by Professor William Sharpe
Mar 5 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Grasping Shadows: The Dark Side in Painting by Professor William Sharpe @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

FULBRIGHT LECTURE What’s in a shadow? Danger and death? Or the vital life-force of whatever object casts it? Are shadows seductive nothings or truth-telling images of repressed sexuality and violence? Starting with literary examples from Dickens, this lecture will untangle the complexity of shadowmeaning by exploring how artists have used shadows since ancient times. Works by Van Eyck, Masaccio, Leonardo, Munch, Picasso, Sargent, Hopper, and many others will be discussed.

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

Sex On The Brain
Mar 5 @ 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Professor Sophie Scott will be addressing sense and nonsense and human brains, and what we think we should be looking for in the study of sex differences.

“My experience of science is that your threshold for accepting data can be really low if you say you’re looking at sex differences. Gender is the outcome of the way that we treat human beings from the minute they’re born and people are interested in knowing if they’re boys or girls,” she says. “We then start constructing a world round them.”

Sophie Scott is a research scientist who investigates human communication and the human brain, with a particular emphasis on the neurobiological basis of vocal communication and how this can go wrong. She is particularly interested in addressing both verbal and non-verbal aspects of vocal communication and has pioneered the study of the neuroscience of laughter. At night, she attempts to turn theory into practice by performing stand-up comedy. Sophie was the Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer in 2017.

£3 to cover expenses

Please note that our next meeting will be on April 16. The one after that will be May 8 to avoid the Bank Holiday (the Monarch hosts events on holiday weekends).

Mar
6
Tue
Inside, Outside – The World of the Artist (Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec)
Mar 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Inside, Outside - The World of the Artist (Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In INSIDE, OUTSIDE, The World of the Art, Nicole Mezey will look at how creativity reflects the personal and professional experience of the artist. This series focuses on a different artist each week, looking first at the life behind their creations – the mental asylum in which Richard Dadd produced some of his greatest works, the pressure of eight children on the output of Frans Hals – before moving on to explore their work and the way it reflects that experience.

Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864 – 1901), Moral Penury

Count Henri Marie Raymond de Toulouse-Lautrec-Monfa may have been born an aristocrat, but exiled from his class, he passed his life in the bars, brothels and cabarets of Montmartre. There he found companionship and not only captured the personalities and decadent spirit of the “fin de siècle”, but developed lithography into a medium for the diffusion of high art.

Nationalist Parties by Vernon Bogdanor
Mar 6 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm
Nationalist Parties by Vernon Bogdanor @ Museum of London | England | United Kingdom

Between 1886 and 1914, British politics was dominated by the Irish Question, and the Irish nationalist party exerted considerable pressure on British governments. Since 1974, the rise of the SNP has brought the Scottish Question into the forefront of British politics, and in 1998, legislation provided for devolution to the non-English parts of the United Kingdom. There remain, nevertheless, strong pressures for Scottish independence, and in Wales there is a lively nationalist party, Plaid Cymru. How is the rise of nationalist parties to be explained?

No reservations are required for this lecture. It will be run on a ‘first come, first served’ basis. Doors will open 30 minutes before the start of the lecture.

The Self and the Selfie
Mar 6 @ 6:45 pm – 11:45 pm
The Self and the Selfie @ The Store | England | United Kingdom

The Self and the Selfie is the second in a series of IAI Events coming to London in spring 2018.

Join us for a unique evening of debate and discussion as our renowned speakers explore the thin lines between narcissism and genius in the Digital Age. With more data stored from one day’s selfies than all the world’s books, many have dismissed Generation Selfie as superficial and vain. Yet creative genius has often been linked to narcissism – Dali once quipped there was no greater joy than waking up as himself. Could focussing on ourselves rather than others be a route to happiness and success? Or is an obsession with ourselves damaging to social cohesion and a likely route to personal misery?