Sep
26
Mon
Dreaming with Vishnu – Comparative Mythology
Sep 26 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Dreaming with Vishnu - Comparative Mythology @ The Bhavan, London | London | England | United Kingdom

‘Dreaming with Vishnu’ is a unique lecture series on Hindu Mythology comparing world mythology. Led by visiting lecturer from India, Dr. Vidya Kamat, the course will be a real eye-opener to persons interested to learn the similarities and differences between cultural norms and the myths that shape them. The course runs from September 26-30 from 6.30pm- 8.30pm all weekdays.

The link below has the lecture and venue details as well as a promotional video about the contents of the course.

http://bhavan.net/events/forthcoming-events/event/487-dreaming-with-Vishnu

Lecture details: http://bhavan.net/images/pdf/DreamingWithVishnu.pdf

Yes we Canzuk: A post-Brexit possibility w/@andrew_lilico
Sep 26 @ 6:30 pm

In a basic vocabulary lesson, new PM Theresa May recently confirmed that “Brexit” actually means “Brexit”.

However, after a summer of political madness, the real question for many of us is: “Now what?”

For one man, Change.org petitions for “Londo-pendence” and desperate applications for Irish passports are not the answer.

Dr Andrew Lilico is pitching for CANZUK – an exciting new union between Britain, Canada, New Zealand and Australia.

Dr Lilico is the executive director of Europe Economics as well as a fellow of the Institute of Economic Affairs – and he has big plans for CANZUK.

Combined, these economic greats would hold $6.5 trillion in combined GDP and 18 million square kilometres of controlled land – that’s 1m square km more than Russia.

At this latest Political City event, he will argue that common values shared between countries, as well as similar levels of income, could make CANZUK a glittering success.

Trade, defence and perhaps most importantly, power, will all be covered in Dr Lilico’s original and insightful pitch.

Whatever side of the fence you are on, or have since jumped over to, please do come along to what promises to be a thought-provoking evening.

No ticket needed – just turn up!

Gattaca (1997) + TALK: Genetic Modification – The Sky’s the Limit?
Sep 26 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm
Gattaca (1997) + TALK: Genetic Modification – The Sky’s the Limit? @ The Victoria | London | England | United Kingdom

Vincent (Ethan Hawke) dreams of becoming a space pilot, but in the world in which he lives only those people with prime genetic material can attain the top jobs. Determined to succeed, he makes a deal with the genetically-perfect Jerome (Jude Law) which will provide him with fresh daily samples of Jerome’s urine, skin and hair, thus allowing him to fake his identity and find a place on the Gattaca space program. The plan starts off working perfectly, but when one of the company’s directors is murdered and Vincent becomes the main suspect, it can only be a matter of time before his secret is revealed.

The screening will be preceded by a talk from Sarah Norcross, Director of the charity Progress Educational Trust (www.progress.org.uk), who will discuss the scientific limits of genetic modification in humans and ask what limits society should place on the use of these technologies. Should a genetic test limit your ambition?

Sep
27
Tue
THE ICONOGRAPHY OF MYTHOLOGY & SYMBOLISM IN ART: Secrets of the Old Masters Revealed (1/10)
Sep 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
THE ICONOGRAPHY OF MYTHOLOGY & SYMBOLISM IN ART:  Secrets of the Old Masters Revealed (1/10) @ The Course at the University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this series of 10 lectures, Leslie Primo will ask what do all the signs and symbols in paintings mean, if indeed they are there, and why is there an enduring fascination with Greek mythology in the visual arts? It can all seem somewhat impenetrable. This course will delve into what these hidden meanings really are. You will see how the iconography of mythology can reveal the hidden codes and identify the seemingly mysterious figures in great works of art. It aims to look at the stories which are often re-told in secular Italian and Northern Renaissance painting around, 1400-1600, and also in French Baroque painting. Most often the stories came from antique literary sources which have survived through the middle ages and were the preserve of the rich and cultured.

THE OLYMPIANS

In the first lecture, the story of the 12 Olympians, their attributions and identifications will be explored through the works of Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Rubens, Tintoretto, Titian, Poussin and more.

GrowUp Urban Farms
Sep 27 @ 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm

GrowUp Urban Farms run the only commercial indoor aquaponic urban farm in a warehouse in East London. Aquaponics combines aquaculture (farming fish) and hydroponics (growing plants in a nutrient solution instead of soil). The farm in Beckton, called Unit 84, is a completely controlled environment growing space, using LED lighting over 10 vertically stacked growing layers, and a Recirculating Aquaculture System (RAS).

There is a growing importance to think more sustainably about food production in light of our growing population and making the most for our resources. This project is in response to that and demonstrates how engineering can be a gateway to greater sustainability in farming.

Organised by the IMechE Food & Drink committee, this lecture is a unique opportunity to hear how engineering innovations have contributed to establishing a sustainable farming environment in an urban setting, including fully-controlled LED lighting and water temperature systems.

Brainwashing: Fears, fantasies and facts about mind control in the Cold War
Sep 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Brainwashing: Fears, fantasies and facts about mind control in the Cold War @ Goldsmiths, University of London | London | England | United Kingdom

In the 1950s, Communist ‘brainwashing’ was seen as a serious threat to Western civilisation — a way to control human thought and behaviour that could undermine personal freedom and democratic society. Where did this idea come from, what does it entail, and why did respected scientists see brainwashing as a window into the workings of the human mind? I will discuss how psychologists, psychiatrists and other scientific experts studied ‘brainwashing’ in the 1950s and ‘60s, and how their findings relate to films and television shows that depict mind control. While behavioural scientists sought to debunk the fantastical image of brainwashing, their research had unintended effects on popular understanding and government policy.

Biography
Marcia Holmes is an historian and post-doctoral researcher on the Hidden Persuaders project, a research group funded by the Wellcome Trust that studies the history of brainwashing and the ‘psy’ sciences during the Cold War. Dr. Holmes’s research brings together histories of psychology, the military, and technology to assess how concepts of human mind and behaviour were shaped by the twentieth century’s expanding military-industrial complex. In 2014 she completed her PhD at the University of Chicago in Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science.

Brainwashing: Fears, Fantasies and facts about mind control in the Cold War
Sep 27 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Brainwashing: Fears, Fantasies and facts about mind control in the Cold War @ Goldsmiths, LG01, Professor Stuart Hall Building | London | England | United Kingdom

In the 1950s, Communist ‘brainwashing’ was seen as a serious threat to Western civilisation — a way to control human thought and behaviour that could undermine personal freedom and democratic society. Where did this idea come from, what does it entail, and why did respected scientists see brainwashing as a window into the workings of the human mind? I will discuss how psychologists, psychiatrists and other scientific experts studied ‘brainwashing’ in the 1950s and ‘60s, and how their findings relate to films and television shows that depict mind control. While behavioural scientists sought to debunk the fantastical image of brainwashing, their research had unintended effects on popular understanding and government policy.

Biography
Marcia Holmes is an historian and post-doctoral researcher on the Hidden Persuaders project, a research group funded by the Wellcome Trust that studies the history of brainwashing and the ‘psy’ sciences during the Cold War. Dr. Holmes’s research brings together histories of psychology, the military, and technology to assess how concepts of human mind and behaviour were shaped by the twentieth century’s expanding military-industrial complex. In 2014 she completed her PhD at the University of Chicago in Conceptual and Historical Studies of Science.

BREXIT and its consequences for the UK and EU Citizenship or Monstrous Citizenship
Sep 27 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
BREXIT and its consequences for the UK and EU Citizenship or Monstrous Citizenship @ Skeel Lecture Theatre, Queen Mary University of London  | London | England | United Kingdom

On 23 June 2016, somewhat to the surprise of the political establishment and the pollsters, the British public voted to leave the European Union. One of the key issues which appears to have moved the British public to vote to leave was EU citizens right to free movement, work and residence anywhere in the Union. Those who led the Leave campaign promised to repatriate the UK’s state sovereignty and thereby abolish the application in the UK of the inalienable rights attaching to EU citizenship. To what extent is citizenship, by definition, a way of describing in law a bundle of rights which are protected from arbitrary interference by state sovereign authorities? In this lecture, Elspeth Guild will examine the issue of citizenship – EU and UK from a legal perspective in light of the political consequences of the BREXIT outcome.

Chair: Professor Carol Harlow, Emeritus Professor of Law LSE

Discussants:
• Professor Valsamis Mitsilegas, HOD School of Law QMUL
• Professor Kees Groenendijk, Professor of Sociology of Law at the University of Nijmegen
• Professor Sionaidh Douglas-Scott, QMUL

Dreaming with Vishnu – Comparative Mythology
Sep 27 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Dreaming with Vishnu - Comparative Mythology @ The Bhavan, London | London | England | United Kingdom

‘Dreaming with Vishnu’ is a unique lecture series on Hindu Mythology comparing world mythology. Led by visiting lecturer from India, Dr. Vidya Kamat, the course will be a real eye-opener to persons interested to learn the similarities and differences between cultural norms and the myths that shape them. The course runs from September 26-30 from 6.30pm- 8.30pm all weekdays.

The link below has the lecture and venue details as well as a promotional video about the contents of the course.

http://bhavan.net/events/forthcoming-events/event/487-dreaming-with-Vishnu

Lecture details: http://bhavan.net/images/pdf/DreamingWithVishnu.pdf

Women in Science: Past, Present, and Future Challenges
Sep 27 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
Women in Science: Past, Present, and Future Challenges @ Sheikh Zayed Theatre, New Academic Building, LSE | London | England | United Kingdom

Despite progress in recent decades, women remain under-represented in many areas of science. Why is this, and what can be done about it? How do the challenges faced by women in science today differ from those faced by previous generations? Does the neuroscience of sex differences show that science requires a ‘male brain’, or does it debunk that idea? And how might the structure and culture of science be improved to help the next generation of female scientists? Historian of science Patricia Fara, philosopher of science Cailin O’Connor, and neuroscientist Melissa Hines will discuss the past, present, and future challenges faced by women in science.

Who Is Afraid of Comics?
Sep 27 @ 6:45 pm – 9:00 pm
Who Is Afraid of Comics? @ Free Word Centre | London | England | United Kingdom

From Fifties horror comic books to the Oz and Nasty Tales trials to today’s fears about manga and webcomics, comics have been the targets of censorship, moral panics, police raids, strict codes of content, controversial obscenity prosecutions, even an Act of Parliament that is still in force. What is it that makes this medium seem so dangerous to certain parties?

Paul Gravett, co-director of Comica.London and co-curator of the British Library’s landmark 2014 exhibition, Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the UK, explores this history, examines how comic creators and readers have fought back, and considers the current climate for freedom of expression.

This event is part of Banned Books Week.

Sep
28
Wed
Framing Frieze: London’s Contemporary Art Scene
Sep 28 @ 9:45 am – 12:00 pm
Framing Frieze: London's Contemporary Art Scene @ Art Workers' Guild | Bath | England | United Kingdom

What are the essential things to know when looking at contemporary art, visiting galleries and art fairs, and discussing new works? Independent curator and writer Ellen Mara De Wachter will reveal some of the secrets.

THE ENGLISH COUNTRY HOUSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (2/5)
Sep 28 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
THE ENGLISH COUNTRY HOUSE IN ENGLISH LITERATURE (2/5) @ The Course at the University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this 5 part series, Jeremy Musson, will explore the way in which the English country house has been portrayed in English literature. By studying various authors, the architecture and household roles of the country house underline characterization, scene and mood and how this in turn shaped our view of the country house in English visual culture. The authors’ personal experiences will be examined and considered for the value of the country house in terms of plot. Used as a vehicle for gathering a group of characters together under one roof for a defined space of time, the country house has long provided a convenient setting in which, as Blake Morrison has commented, tensions can develop, love affairs begin and catastrophes unfold.

CHARLES DICKENS AND ANTHONY TROLLOPE

In the second lecture, we will examine how these two great mid-Victorian writers used country houses in their fiction in different ways: Dickens for atmosphere, and Trollope for character. The former suffered financial hardship during a London childhood and yet produced vivid portraits of vast, rambling houses, such as the eponymous Bleak House and depressing manors like Chesney Wold. Trollope was born into a gentry-clergy background. He became an enthusiastic hunter which gave him first-hand experience of the lives and routines of country houses. In the Barchester Chronicles he perceptively describes the houses of the aristocracy, gentry and clergy to underline character and heighten the drama.

Globalisation and inequality
Sep 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:15 pm
Globalisation and inequality @ The British Academy | London | England | United Kingdom

The causes of rising income inequality have been debated for 20 years. Recent research is shedding new light on the role of globalisation in shaping inequality. This lecture by Professor Elhanan Helpman FBA (Harvard University) will start with a historical account, and end with the most recent insights.

Chair: Professor Richard Blundell FBA, UCL.

Free, no registration required. For more information, visit: www.britishacademy.ac.uk/globalisation-and-inequality

Dreaming with Vishnu – Comparative Mythology
Sep 28 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Dreaming with Vishnu - Comparative Mythology @ The Bhavan, London | London | England | United Kingdom

‘Dreaming with Vishnu’ is a unique lecture series on Hindu Mythology comparing world mythology. Led by visiting lecturer from India, Dr. Vidya Kamat, the course will be a real eye-opener to persons interested to learn the similarities and differences between cultural norms and the myths that shape them. The course runs from September 26-30 from 6.30pm- 8.30pm all weekdays.

The link below has the lecture and venue details as well as a promotional video about the contents of the course.

http://bhavan.net/events/forthcoming-events/event/487-dreaming-with-Vishnu

Lecture details: http://bhavan.net/images/pdf/DreamingWithVishnu.pdf

Gambling, the most addictive drug? w/@Rumit2186
Sep 28 @ 7:00 pm
Gambling, the most addictive drug? w/@Rumit2186 @ Conway Hall | London | England | United Kingdom

Rumit Somaiya has spent the past 25 years touring casinos throughout the world with his team. Their aim is simply to overcome the ‘House Advantage’ using all cerebral methods available, in order to amass fortunes. Historically ‘Blackjack’, ‘Pontoon’ and ’21’ have been the games of choice. The most well known method is ‘card counting’ which is surprisingly easy to learn but many other legal methods of ‘casino advantage play’ will be discussed.

Rumit will also discuss other forms of gambling including ‘Sports Betting’, ‘Fixed odds betting’ and the national lottery. Most people don’t understand the maths of gambling and sadly addiction is a major issue. The UK government largely distances itself from this issue as just like ‘Alcohol’ and ’Nicotine’ the taxation revenues generated from gambling are huge.

Doors open at 6.30 pm for talk at 7.00 p.m

Please arrive early to enjoy a glass of wine from our charity wine bar and mingle.

All profits from the wine bar will go to help those with a gambling problem.

Please note, we charge a token entrance fee of £3 to help towards the hire of the venue and equipment. If you can’t attend and would still like to contribute or would prefer to pay online please click here.

Sep
29
Thu
OUT OF THE DARKNESS 2/5
Sep 29 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
OUT OF THE DARKNESS 2/5 @ The Course at the University Women's Club | London | England | United Kingdom

Founded in 1994, THE COURSE offers art history lectures, opera and literature courses, guided museum visits and London walks.

In this 5 part series, Nicole Mezey, looks at how symbolic, illuminating, awe inspiring – the mastery of light has been a vital tool of the western artist. The course looks at such forms as stained glass, the natural light of Constable, the brooding emotion of Rubens and the reflections of Impressionism in an attempt to understand the fascination of light and its immense possibilities for the artist.

CAPTURING THE SPARK 

The second lecture looks at different artistic media and how they present alternative possibilities for conveying the presence and the subtleties of light.  In particular, the movement of painters from tempera to oil paint from the C15th creates the opportunity of rich glazes and a new radiance to give new dimension to the experienceand narrative of the world.

 

 

Thinkers for our time: Thomas Malthus
Sep 29 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Thinkers for our time: Thomas Malthus @ The British Academy | London | England | United Kingdom

In 1798 Thomas Malthus’ An Essay on the Principle of Population was published. Over 200 years later, many of the issues at the heart of it are still prevalent in our society. What influence has his work had since it was first produced? Does his thinking still have a place in modern society and the issues we face in tackling social, economic and political inequalities? This event is the third in the British Academy’s ‘Thinkers for our Time’ series.

Free, please register online: www.britishacademy.ac.uk/thinkers-our-time-thomas-malthus

Dreaming with Vishnu – Comparative Mythology
Sep 29 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Dreaming with Vishnu - Comparative Mythology @ The Bhavan, London | London | England | United Kingdom

‘Dreaming with Vishnu’ is a unique lecture series on Hindu Mythology comparing world mythology. Led by visiting lecturer from India, Dr. Vidya Kamat, the course will be a real eye-opener to persons interested to learn the similarities and differences between cultural norms and the myths that shape them. The course runs from September 26-30 from 6.30pm- 8.30pm all weekdays.

The link below has the lecture and venue details as well as a promotional video about the contents of the course.

http://bhavan.net/events/forthcoming-events/event/487-dreaming-with-Vishnu

Lecture details: http://bhavan.net/images/pdf/DreamingWithVishnu.pdf

The Winchester: Legend of the West
Sep 29 @ 6:30 pm – 8:00 pm
The Winchester: Legend of the West @ The British Library | London | England | United Kingdom

BBC journalists explores the history of, and family behind the Winchester Rifle

The Winchester Rifle, the iconic gun made in New Haven, Connecticut, and sold in its hundreds of thousands around the world, mirrors American expansion at a key period in the young country’s history. The lethal repeating rifle became the defining image of America’s frontier – and was known amongst Native Americans as “the spirit gun”. It represented both the pioneering vigour and the brutal force which conquered the West.

Laura Trevelyan, BBC journalist, descendent of the Winchester family, and author of The Winchester: Legend of the West (I.B.Tauris, September 2016) will be in conversation with Reeta Chakrabati, BBC News presenter and correspondent. She presents the One, Six and Ten O’Clock News on BBC1 and also reports at home and abroad.

Sponsored by the Eccles Centre for American Studies at the British Library

Rose Tremain: Forty Years On
Sep 29 @ 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm
Rose Tremain: Forty Years On @ The British Library | London | England | United Kingdom

Novelist Rose Tremain reflects on 40 years as a writer

Forty years ago Rose Tremain’s first novel, Sadler’s Birthday, was accepted for publication. Since then she has published 14 novels, five collections of short stories, and has worked in radio, television and film. In conversation with the Royal Society of Literature’s Literary Director, Maggie Fergusson, she talks about her latest novel, The Gustav Sonata, about why she searches for subjects outside her own experience, and why, even in a novel, truth is all.

Sponsored by the Royal Society of Literature

The Death of Gregory Akerman
Sep 29 @ 7:45 pm
The Death of Gregory Akerman @ The Bell | London | England | United Kingdom

“Professional troublemaker hassles psychics to unlock death’s mysteries.”

The Death of Gregory Akerman sees the eponymous Gregory explore his obsession with death along with the importance of deadlines in his life. If Gregory can work out when he’ll die, perhaps this information will spur him on to actually achieving something.

Gregory enjoys learning, befriending fringe groups (Heaven’s Gate [how?], the Swedenborg Society, Vatican etc) and having adventures. A professional trouble maker, Gregory wants to share his stories with you.

Sep
30
Fri
Dreaming with Vishnu – Comparative Mythology
Sep 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Dreaming with Vishnu - Comparative Mythology @ The Bhavan, London | London | England | United Kingdom

‘Dreaming with Vishnu’ is a unique lecture series on Hindu Mythology comparing world mythology. Led by visiting lecturer from India, Dr. Vidya Kamat, the course will be a real eye-opener to persons interested to learn the similarities and differences between cultural norms and the myths that shape them. The course runs from September 26-30 from 6.30pm- 8.30pm all weekdays.

The link below has the lecture and venue details as well as a promotional video about the contents of the course.

http://bhavan.net/events/forthcoming-events/event/487-dreaming-with-Vishnu

Lecture details: http://bhavan.net/images/pdf/DreamingWithVishnu.pdf

The Green Hour. Absinthe Tasting.
Sep 30 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Absinthe, or ‘the green fairy’, fuelled 19th-century French artistic creativity. Van Gogh and Toulouse-Lautrec drank this wormwood liquor heavily, while Manet and Degas made it the subject of their paintings.

Discover the scandalous history and enduring mystique of absinthe with master distiller Ted Breaux, and explore Manet’s Corner of a Café-Concert in a talk by Jo Rhymer. For those who would like to sample this alcoholic drink, we close with an absinthe tasting, sponsored by Sip Or Mix.

N-3858-00-000040-pp

Which forms of memorial best commemorate the Holocaust?
Sep 30 @ 7:00 pm

The first Awkward Art History by Art Historian Sue Ecclestone – Sue will lead us through some of the more sensitive subjects of art historical discourse not usually discussed in mainstream art historical lectures.

Awkward Art Histories: Which forms of memorial best commemorate the Holocaust?

The collective commemoration of the dead is part of most communities’ public landscape. How we remember those dead varies from nation to nation, religion to religion and conflict to conflict and takes many forms. Most of these memorials are highly visible and usually take the form of plaques or sculptures bearing a list of names; the sculptures are often figurative. The design of memorials are also influenced by, among other things, location and commissioning and have a tendency to be obvious in their intention while prescribing how the beholder should feel or behave, thus influencing the way they remember the dead: they engage the viewer while manipulating their feelings.

Most memorials aim to honour those who died in the service of their country. However, many innocent victims die during conflicts of war and it is the attempt to honour the memory of around eleven million people in the Holocaust under the regime in Nazi Germany that we shall address in this talk. In most cases there are no graves for these people, many reduced to ash, and in the past few decades attempts have been made to provide places to commemorate those lost in the Holocaust while offering consolation and healing to those involved in other ways, both directly and indirectly. If the purpose of a memorial to the dead is not only to remember their presence in life, but to warn future generations of the dangers (among many others) of dictatorship, war and genocide, how does one begin to design such a monument?