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Jun
7
Thu
A summer of architecture: a season of events exploring medicine and architecture
Jun 7 @ 5:00 pm – Jul 7 @ 1:00 pm

South elevation, Royal College of Physicians

Join the Royal College of Physicians museum to explore Sir Denys Lasdun’s Grade I listed modernist masterpiece, its home in Regent’s Park, and discover medicine’s rich architectural heritage.

In a season of events forming part of the London Festival of Architecture, and the college’s 500th anniversary celebrations, attend a free museum late, take an architectural tour of a 20th century icon, join a panel discussion on Lasdun’s legacy, sign up for a guided architectural walk or participate in an architectural photography workshop.  

London Festival of Architecture Museum Late
Thursday, 07 June 2018: 5-8pm (architectural tours from 6pm)
FREE

A chance to explore Denys Lasdun’s 20th century icon after hours and take a free architectural tour.

Find out more and book places 

Marble Hall 1964, RCP, Cropped

Spotlight on modernist architecture: Denys Lasdun’s legacy
Wednesday, 13 June 2018: Panel discussion 7-8.30pm
Tickets £8 (concessions £5)

Join architect and Denys Lasdun’s former colleague, Ted Cullinan, architectural historian Dr Barnabas Calder and Suzanne Waters of the RIBA Library to discuss the lasting legacy of Sir Denys Lasdun.

Find out more and book places

Walking Tour: Homes for Healing: An architectural history of health
Thursday, 21 June 2018: 2-5pm
Tickets £12 (LFA attendees, £8)

Take a tour of the Royal College of Physicians followed by a guided architectural walk through medical London.

Find out more and book places

Architectural photography workshop
Saturday, 07 July 2018: 10am -1pm
Tickets £20 (concessions, £15)

Join an architectural photography workshop covering the core elements of documenting the built environment. Led by a professional photography tutor. Suitable for all levels of experience.

Find out more and book places

This summer, be inspired by a building that represents ‘the best architecture of its time anywhere in the world’ and intrigued by medicine’s relationship with the built environment!

Jun
11
Mon
Summer in the medicinal garden: A series of afternoons exploring medical plants and herbal medicines
Jun 11 @ 1:30 pm – Sep 10 @ 6:00 pm
Summer in the medicinal garden: A series of afternoons exploring medical plants and herbal medicines @ Royal College of Physicians | England | United Kingdom

Join the Royal College of Physicians in their medicinal garden for a series of three afternoons exploring medical plants and herbal remedies past and present, celebrating the College’s 500th anniversary.

World renowned experts deliver talks on themes as diverse as plants in anaesthesia, the 400th birthday of one of Britain’s most influential book of medicines, poisons in the works of Agatha Christie, addictive herbs and modern food supplements.

With themed lectures, an expert-led garden tour and refreshments included each afternoon, there can be no better way to discover one of London’s most fascinating botanical gems this summer.

All events cost just £10 and are sure to sell out quickly. Reserve your place now using the links below.

Monday, 11 June 2018

A history of plants in anaesthesia by Dr David Wilkinson, former consultant anaesthetist, St Bartholomew’s Hospital and ‘Unicorn Horn and London Treacle’ a celebration of the 400th birthday of the publication of Pharmacopeia Londinensis by Tony Cartwright, retired pharmaceutical regulatory consultant.

Tickets for this event also include admission to the Poynter Lecture of the British Society for the History of Medicine at 6pm: ‘The Doctor as Collector’ by Dr Simon Chaplin, Director of Culture and Society at the Wellcome Trust. For details of the Poytner Lecture, click here

Click here for more information and to book your place for this event.

Monday, 16 July 2018

Plants poison in the works of Agatha Christie, by Dr Kathryn Harkup, author of ‘A is for Arsenic: the poisons of Agatha Christie’ and a study of addictive substances derived from plants, from alcohol to morphine and cocaine, by Professor Graham Foster, Royal College of Physicians Garden Fellow and Professor of Hepatology.

Click here for more information and to book your place for this event.

Monday, 10 September 2018

‘Neutraceuticals’, Professor Ruth Andrew of the University of Edinburgh examines plant-based supplements and fortified food, and ‘Oranges and Lemons’ the true story of citrus fruits in scurvy told by Dr Henry Oakeley, Royal College of Physicians Garden Fellow and retired consultant psychiatrist.

Click here for more information and to book your place for this event.

Programme

1.30pm    Registration with refreshments
2pm         First lecture
3pm         Tea and coffee with garden tours of relevant plants by Royal College Garden Fellows
4pm         Second lecture
5pm         Drinks reception
6pm         Event finishes

 

Jun
26
Tue
Magick and Power in the Age of Trump
Jun 26 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Magick and Power in the Age of Trump @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Did positive thinking and mental science help put Donald Trump in the White House? And are there any other hidden powers of the mind and thought at work in today’s world politics?

In Dark Star Rising: Magick and Power in the Age of Trump, historian and cultural critic Gary Lachman takes a close look at the various magical and esoteric ideas that are impacting political events across the globe.

From New Thought and Chaos Magick to the far-right esotericism of Julius Evola and the Traditionalists, Lachman follows a trail of mystic clues that involve, among others, Norman Vincent Peale, domineering gurus and demagogues, Ayn Rand, Pepe the Frog, Rene Schwaller de Lubicz, synarchy, the Alt-Right, meme magic, and Vladimir Putin and his postmodern Rasputin.

Come take a drop down the rabbit hole of occult politics in the twenty-first century and find out the post-truths and alternative facts surrounding the 45th President of the United States with one of the leading writers on esotericism and its influence on modern culture.

Jun
27
Wed
Exhilarating Places 10/10 (Xanadu)
Jun 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
Exhilarating Places 10/10 (Xanadu) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, THE COURSE offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

How can we know, before we ever go there, that a new place will exhilarate us? Painting, photography, fiction, travel-writing, and poetry can put us on the plane with expectations, and pictures in our minds, and of course we then match what they promise against the realities that await us. Afterwards, art and writing intensify what we found, show us sights we missed, clothing our memories of them in the aura of legend as they had our hopes, so we may wonder if they exist when we are not there. Exhilarating Places visits charismatic cultural centres of our world and others we have dreamed of and invented. They catch our eye and instantly deliver both real and imagined destinations in great art and writing.

Xanadu

Marco Polo called on the Great Khan in 1275 and wrote about him. So the name of Xanadu crossed the continents and centuries and reached the ears of Samuel Purchas, Samuel Taylor Coleridge in his poem ‘Kubla Khan’, Italo Calvino, Orson Welles, Simon Armitage, and the great literary travellers; with relics from the Khan’s palace, illustrations of the court, the Catalan Atlas, and work by Cremona, Richardson, Albert Goodwin, Dugald Stewart Walker, Patten Wilson, Lang, and John Vassos.

Jun
30
Sat
The Haunted City: Modern Monsters and Urban Myths
Jun 30 @ 10:00 am – 5:00 pm
The Haunted City: Modern Monsters and Urban Myths @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Join the London Fortean Society in London’s dark heart for a day of modern monsters and urban myth including Spring-heeled Jack, Cthulhu, Slender Man, subterranean London folklore, the Crying Boy and more.

Our cityscapes are full of strange wonders, terrors and tales. Come hear of them.

Mike Dash – Spring-heeled Jack
Andrea Kitta – Slender Man
Dr David Clarke – Tears for Fears: The Curse of the Crying Boy
Justin Woodman – Pulp Fiction to Pop-Nihilism: H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu and the Making of a Modern Monstrous Myth.
Antony Clayton – Subterranean London
Gail-Nina Anderson – The Vampire Rabbit of Newcastle upon Tyne
Tina Rath – The Hackney Bear Hunt
Scott Wood – The Legend of the Hidden Insult

Mike Dash – Spring-heeled Jack

Ever since his earliest appearances in 1837, Spring-heeled Jack – a demonic bogey who breathed fire at his victims, tore at their clothes with iron claws, and leaped over hedgerows and houses to evade pursuit – has been one of the strangest and most unsettling mystery attackers in the Fortean and folkloric canon.

Mike Dash has been researching the case since 1983, and presents an overview of the evidence that sets Jack in his contemporary contexts, explores his antecedents, and asks whether he is really as unique a figure as he seems to be.

Dr Mike Dash is an historian and long-time member of Fortean Times’s legendary Gang of Fort. Educated at Cambridge and King’s College London, he is the author of seven books, including Borderlands, an overview of strange phenomena reviewed by New Scientist as “exhaustive, erudite and superb.” He now runs a company devoted to improving critical thinking in schools and universities.

Andrea Kitta – Slender Man

The Slender Man is a contemporary monster that has stepped out from the digital world and out in to the physical. Dr Andrea Kitta discusses the beginnings of Slenderman on the Something Awful forum and other venues for creepypasta, there is a shared aesthetic and, at times, a shared experience that taps into something deeper than mere play. Just as Slender Man himself is complicated, so is belief in Slender Man.

Slender Man is not a simple entity that can be looked at as belonging to a single folk group. He is, possibly, an acknowledgement of the unacknowledged common experience of being watched. The reason why he “feels real” to so many people is because he helps to give a voice to a real experience that is difficult to understand otherwise. Like legends, which are not literally true but rather “typify life in modern society” (Smith 1999), Slender Man also is a part of the experience of life in the modern world.

Andrea Kitta is a folklorist with a specialty in medicine, belief, and the supernatural. She is also interested in Internet folklore, narrative, and contemporary (urban) legend. Her current research includes: vaccines, pandemic illness, contagion and contamination, stigmatized diseases, disability, health information on the Internet and Slender Man. She is co-editor for the journal Contemporary Legend, a scholarly journal published annually by the International Society for Contemporary Legend Research.

Antony Clayton – Subterranean London

Antony Clayton, author of Subterranean City, Beneath the Streets of London and Secret Tunnels of England: Folklore & Fact, will examine aspects of the folklore of underground London. The talk will concentrate principally on some of the stories of the capital’s ancient ‘secret’ passages and tunnels and sightings of ghosts underground.

Dr David Clarke – Tears for Fears: The Curse of the Crying Boy

The Crying Boy (TCB) is a mass produced sentimental print and an example of ‘folk art’ that was popular from the 1970s in working glass families in the UK. It exists in many forms. In 1985 a British tabloid newspaper The Sun published a series of hyperbolic stories reporting the existence of a jinx attached to this hideously tasteless, yet popular print. The source of the stories was attributed fire fighters who had noted the frequent occurrence of the print at domestic property fires in one English community. The intervention of journalists added a supernatural element to the story and created a proto-legend. This talk examines how TCB acquired a narrative and was transformed as it migrated from print to online media.

David Clarke teaches Media Law, regulation and ethics on the undergraduate and postgraduate journalism courses at Sheffield Hallam. As Principal Research Fellow he leads on integrating teaching and research in the Journalism Subject Group.

His publications and wide experience as a broadcaster and consultant/curator for The National Archives UFO project has brought international recognition to the University as a centre of expertise in the study of contemporary legends.

Justin Woodman and Phil Hine – Pulp Fiction to Pop-Nihilism: H.P. Lovecraft’s Cthulhu and the Making of a Modern Monstrous Myth.

Monsters continue to haunt the landscape and imagination of ‘rational’ metropolitan modernity, often in new and unexpected forms which reflect uniquely modern fears and anxieties. Cthulhu – the monstrously betentacled denizen of the deep and H.P. Lovecraft’s best-known literary creation – is one such entity: despite their well-documented origin in the weird fiction of the 1920s, both Cthulhu and Lovecraft’s expanded ‘Cthulhu mythos’ are considered to be an authentic esoteric reality by some – a supposition which has exerted a significant influence upon some of the conspiratorial, cryptozoological, and paranormal beliefs which populate contemporary digital and media worlds.

This talk explores the evolution of Cthulhu from Lovecraft’s own secular expression of modern existential dread, through to its current status as nihilistic occultural and pop-cultural myth, examining its resonance in relation to the angst, unease and alienation often seen to characterise existence in a rapidly-changing and increasingly uncertain world.

Justin Woodman is a lecturer in anthropology at Goldsmiths College (The University of London), where he teaches courses on the anthropology of the paranormal, and has written on the intersection between Lovecraft’s fiction and contemporary occultures.

Phil Hine is an independent researcher and occult practitioner, he has been writing and lecturing on esoteric themes and practices for over thirty years.

Gail-Nina Anderson – The Vampire Rabbit of Newcastle upon Tyne

Amongst its fair share of public statuary and sculpted architectural detail, Newcastle counts a unique representation – the Vampire Rabbit. In a quiet corner behind the Cathedral, above the door of a 1901 office building it squats menacingly, complete with lurid claws and fangs. This talk explores the tall tales that have sprung up around our beloved (and still inexplicable) beast and their relation to folklore traditions involving rabbits and hares.

Tina Rath – The Hackney Bear Hunt
“We were near the football pitches at about five o’clock in the evening when we saw it,” said Darren Willoughby, aged 12, “It was very close to us, standing on its hind legs and about seven feet tall.”

On 27 December1981 four boys from Lower Clapton took their dogs out for a walk across Hackney Marshes. Past Millfields Road, near the football pitches, the boys encountered “a giant great growling hairy thing”. They met a bear in Hackney.

Tina Rath hunts the story of the Hackney Bear, the police hunt for it and how is returned in 2012 and why a Brit Pop bands may have been involved. Tina gained her doctorate from London University with a thesis on The Vampire in Popular Fiction and her MA with a dissertation on The Vampire in the Theatre.

Scott Wood – The Legend of the Hidden Insult
Did you hear about the insult hidden in the jacket of a prince or inside the car of a queen? Or the insult placed on the front of a City office block or outside Harrods at Christmas? The Hidden Insult is a rude, irreverent piece of revenge folklore.

Scott Wood, author of London Urban Legends: The Corpse on the Tube and host of the London Fortean Society, discusses this fun and sometimes filthy urban legend.

Jul
1
Sun
Thinking on Sunday: Vaccination Myths
Jul 1 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Thinking on Sunday: Vaccination Myths @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Recent research and media coverage also shows that parents are increasingly choosing to not vaccinate their children. Factors a lack of understanding of how the vaccine works, religious or philosophical objections, fear of government control in areas of personal choice, concern about safety and/or efficacy, beliefs that vaccine-preventable diseases do not pose a serious health risk, certainty that alternative treatments are superior, concerns that vaccines are promoted for the sake of financial gain, and belief that vaccines are not “natural”.

Dr Kitta’s research draws on ethnography, media, Internet, and narrative analyses to explore the vernacular explanatory models used in inoculation decision-making. Many of the studies mentioned above touch on reasons why parents decide not to vaccinate.

In order to even begin to understand this language, ethnographic research skills are necessary as vaccination narratives are presented and communicated in a variety of ways through the use of traditional narratives and beliefs. The most common genres used in vaccination discourse are contemporary legends, rumour, and personal experience narratives, or in some cases, a combination of the three.

This presentation explores vernacular beliefs and practices that surround decisions to not vaccinate with the primary aim of providing concrete recommendations for improving inoculation promotion programs. Understanding health choices is dependent on exploring the variety of cultural concerns and influences that constitute risk for the communities and individuals in question. Risk categories and risk perception are multifaceted, culture-bound, personal, and political.

Andrea Kitta is a folklorist with a specialty in medicine, belief, and the supernatural. She is also interested in Internet folklore, narrative, and contemporary (urban) legend. Her current research includes: vaccines, pandemic illness, contagion and contamination, stigmatized diseases, disability, health information on the Internet and Slender Man. She is co-editor for the journal Contemporary Legend, a scholarly journal published annually by the International Society for Contemporary Legend Research.

Jul
2
Mon
500 years of medicine. Today: Are teenagers really irrational?
Jul 2 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

On the face of it, teenagers can seem as though they behave irrationally and impulsively, taking excessive risks. Yet neuroscience reveals that something much more complex may be going on.

Join Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore of UCL as she explains her research into the development of the adolescent brain in humans.

Our social cognitive processes are involved in navigating an increasingly complex world. These processes start to develop in childhood and continue to do so throughout adolescence.

Whilst this stage in human life is often seen as characterised by irrational behaviour, these behaviours can be interpreted as both rational and adaptive. This understanding comes from appreciating that a key goal of this period is to mature into an independent adult living in a social world that is unstable and changing.

Over the last twenty years neuroscience research has shown that the human brain develops both structurally and in the way it works during adolescence. Areas of the social brain undergo significant reorganization during this crucial second decade. These major changes may in turn reflect a particularly sensitive period for adapting to the social environment.

Whilst adolescence brings risks and vulnerabilities (particularly to mental ill health), it is also a crucial period of opportunities, as the social brain reorganises itself in preparation for adulthood.

These major findings from the work of cognitive neuroscience have wide-ranging implications for how we structure public health and education to best meet the needs of today’s teenagers and tomorrow’s adults.

Of equal interest to parents and teenagers, teachers, medical professionals and anyone with a stake in the future, this event is open to everyone.

The Royal College of Physicians presents this fascinating free lecture as part of a season marking its 500th anniversary, reflecting on the history and future of medicine, society and health.

Professor Sarah-Jayne Blakemore
Sarah-Jayne Blakemore is Professor in Cognitive Neuroscience at UCL. She is Leader of the Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience Group and Deputy Director of the UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience.

Professor Blakemore is actively involved in public engagement with science activities and has an interest in the links between neuroscience and education. She also worked with Company Three on their play, Brainstorm, written and performed by teenagers, which was shown at the National Theatre in London.

Programme
6pm – Arrival refreshments (tea and coffee)
6.30pm –  Lecture starts
7.30pm –  Lecture finishes

Other events in the series can be booked online at the links below:

May to October 2018: 500 years of medicine: Discover Medical London Walking Tours
Thursday 14 June 2018: 500 years of medicine. The 1700s: enlightenment, revolution and crisis
Monday, 02 July 2018: 500 years of medicine. Today: Are teenagers really irrational?
Tuesday 10 July 2018: 500 years of medicine. The 1800s: conflict, empire and identity
Thursday 13 September 2018: 500 years of medicine. The 1900s: doctors, smoking and public health

Plato on Tyranny in the Gorgias
Jul 2 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Both the Republic and the Gorgias look at both the internal constitution of a person and that of an organized society. How do we govern ourselves and how should a society govern itself? We explored in our previous session (on the Republic) how a tyrannical society and a tyrannical life arise.

The Gorgias is concerned with similar questions. The three main speakers in the dialogue argue with Socrates about the best life to live, and the aims this works towards. In political context of Plato’s time Athenian democracy entailed a persuasive power being used by politicians and rhetoricians to persuade the citizens on a course of action. Does this give the most power to rhetoricians, as they can convince others to do what they want?

Eventually the conversation turns to a tyrant as a possible example of someone who gets what they want. But what power does a tyrant posses? Is the life of a tyrant an enviable one, or is he to be pitied? Socrates argues that although a tyrant may do as he pleases, he is unable to obtain what he truly wants, since he is unable to discern the “good” – the all-important criterion of human choices. In the dialogue Polus, a rhetorician who has claimed that a clever rhetorician wields the same power as a tyrant, goes further and says that rhetoric is therefore a more profitable study than philosophy. We’ll read an extract from the dialogue in which Socrates attempts to show Polus that the path of tyranny is the worst possible for a human to follow. We should have a good hour to discuss the issues that arise.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Jul
4
Wed
Screening + Artist Talk: Leandro Feal, Andreas Siegfried + Dr. Ziba Ardalan
Jul 4 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Screening + Artist Talk: Leandro Feal, Andreas Siegfried + Dr. Ziba Ardalan @ Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art | England | United Kingdom

Join us for a screening of artist Leandro Feal’s video work Hotel Roma (2017), followed by an in-conversation with Leandro Feal, art advisor Andreas Siegfried and Parasol unit Director Ziba Ardalan.

From 6pm to 7pm, guests are invited to view Hotel Roma while enjoying complimentary beer, wine and small plates from our culinary neighbours, Sardine.

At 7pm, the in-conversation will begin, with the event ending by 8pm.

About Hotel Roma  (2017)

Hotel Roma, 2017

Full HD Video

Length: 00:52:35

A video composed by approximately 19,000 photographs taken by the artist during the year 2017 in the Roma bar, located in the roof of the former Roma Hotel, currently an apartment building. The pictures are a document of that part of Havana night life and are accompanied by a soundtrack consisting of seven pieces of Cuban music from the last century 60’s and 70’s.

‘The Roma bar is also one of the nuclei where you can see the atmosphere of cultural and economic openness in recent years in Cuba, where many young people come together; persons who have finished their university studies or in the course of them have preferred the private work in various ways, a small alternative economy society with more access to money that generates a different lifestyle, sometimes very linked to Havana night. Places like Studio 54, or Andy Warhol’s Factory, or the Factory from the rave scene in Manchester, or the cafe Lhemitz from the photos by André Petersen, or the mythical bars of the Movida Madrileña are proof of the importance of this kind of sites in the process of gestation and expansion towards new cultural sensitivities.’

–      Leandro Feal

About the speakers

Leandro Feal (b. 1986) lives and works in Havana, Cuba. He is a graduate from the San Alejandro National Academy of Fine Arts (2006, Havana, Cuba) and from the Cátedra de Arte de Conducta run by Tania Bruguera (2007). Solo exhibition include: “Blow Up, Blow Up” (along with Joan Fontcuberta) (2016, El Apartamento gallery, Havana); “Vivir la fotografía sin vivir de ella”, (2015, Centro Provincial de Artes Plásticas y Diseño, Havana); “Donde nadie es exclusivo” (2013, Centro de Desarrollo de las Artes Visuales, Havana); “Lugar común, lugar extraño” (2015, Bilbao Arte, Bilbao).

Andreas Siegfried is a VIP consultant for Masterpiece London and founded Siegfried Contemporary in 2010. In his function as an Art advisor, Andreas specialises in Modern and Contemporary Art. Working with established as well as emerging artists, he has a particular focus on works from Europe and the Americas. For more information see: Siegfried Contemporary

Dr. Ziba Ardalan is the Founder, Director and Curator of Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art. Since 2004, Parasol unit has presented over fifty exhibitions as well as over a dozen other artistic projects. In addition the foundation has published over forty publications and runs an active programme of education for adults, families and children

The People vs. Tech: How the internet is killing democracy (and how we save it) – w/@JamieJBartlett
Jul 4 @ 7:30 pm

Jamie will talk about his new book ‘The People Vs Tech’, which argues there is a looming war between democracy and digital technology. He will explain what Cambridge Analytica did during the Trump election – and whether it made a difference – and suggest that democracies are being slowly undermined by the internet. Jamie will also set out what needs to be done to avoid the drift into techno-authoritarianism.

Copies of Jamie’s latest book will be available for purchase at the event and he will be happy to sign copies upon request.

Jul
6
Fri
Supper talk: Weird and Wacky Plants Project! with @mr_plantgeek at @ChelsPhysicGdn
Jul 6 @ 7:00 pm – 8:15 pm

 

 

Supper talk: Weird and Wacky Plants Project!

Friday 6th July 2018 (talk 7-8.15pm with optional supper from 5.45 or 8.30pm) – Chelsea Physic Garden (@ChelsPhysicGdn) with Michael Perry (@mr_plantgeek).

With help from some of the world’s most prominent plants-people, you can join Michael Perry (aka Mr. Plant Geek) on an hour’s visual journey through the fascinating plant world! We’ll look at plants with super powers, plants that move themselves, plants with sexual prowess, plants that smell of weird things, and lots lots more!

Michael Perry has loved plants since he was just 5 years old, and especially loves unusual, odd, weird plants, and plants that do things you don’t expect them to…! His career has taken him all around the world in his quest to find and learn more about plants.

He has now brought all this together in the Weird and Wacky Plants Project!
https://mrplantgeek.com/

Event link and booking: https://www.chelseaphysicgarden.co.uk/Events/supper-talk-weird-and-wacky-plants-project


Please note, when you book the talk the £17 ticket price includes a glass of wine (or soft drink) and entry to the Garden. Please book your supper separately (also £17 per person) – we will have sittings at 5.45pm and 8.30pm.

The meal will be a mixed buffet as well as a dessert.

The talk itself is from 7-8.15pm

Please note there is no lift to the lecture room and we apologise for any inconvenience this might cause.

Nearest tube: Sloane Square
Nearest pier: Cadogan Pier (Thames Clippers)
Buses: 11, 19, 22, 211 or 319 from Sloane Sq to Chelsea Old Town Hall (Stop KC) or 170 bus (B302 by Flood Street).

Jul
15
Sun
The Almighty Dollar
Jul 15 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
The Almighty Dollar @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

From a shopping trip in suburban Texas, via China’s central bank, Nigerian railroads, the oilfields of Iraq and beyond, economist and broadcaster Dharshini David follows the incredible journey of a single dollar to reveal the truths behind what we see on the news every day, and to see how the global economy really works. Why would a nation build a bridge on the other side of the planet? Why is China the world’s biggest manufacturer – and the USA its biggest customer? Is free trade really a good thing?

Dharshini David is an economist and broadcaster. From 2009 she fronted Sky News’ daily financial coverage from the heart of the City, as well as co-presenting the channel’s flagship Sky News Tonight programme. Before joining Sky, Dharshini advised Tesco’s board on broadcast media. Prior to that, she was the face of the BBC’s Wall Street coverage in New York, from where she presented a daily business show, and covered business, economics and consumer issues in London across the BBC, from the BBC1 Ten O’Clock News to Panorama and Radio 4’s Today programme. Dharshini was recruited by the BBC while working on HSBC Investment Bank’s trading floor as its UK Economist.

This is her first book which will be available on the day.

Jul
16
Mon
Women as Philosophers in the Platonic Tradition
Jul 16 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Women were members of almost every philosophical school and movement in the ancient world, including the Platonic tradition. In fact, individual female philosophers are attested as philosophical students of Plato’s academy and as philosophical teachers and students in the late Platonists schools in late antiquity. In the Symposium, Plato puts one of his important accounts about the nature of philosophy into the mouth of a woman, Diotima, who is represented as Socrates’ teacher and as a prophetess and priestess, as well as a philosopher. In the Republic, Plato has Socrates argue that natural talents are distributed alike among both genders and that women should be educated, trained and employed in the same fields and disciplines as men – in music, gymnastics and war, as well as in philosophy.
We will explore the importance and roles of women philosophers connected with the Platonic tradition, focusing on Axiothea and Lastheneia, female students in Plato’s Academy, Plutarch’s wife Timoxena and his colleague Clea (who was also a priestess), Gemina the Elder and Younger and Amphiclea, female philosophers who were members of Plotinus’ philosophical school, Porphyry’s wife Marcella, Sosipatra, one of the successors of Iamblichus’ philosophical school, and the famous Alexandrian philosopher, Hypatia. Since there are few philosophical works written by women that survive from the ancient world (an important issue in itself which will be discussed), we will explore a range of texts which depict and discuss the lives and works of these female philosophers, reflecting on the significant contributions made to philosophy by these women and the importance of women’s involvement in philosophy more broadly.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Jul
19
Thu
Who Put Bella in the Wych Elm?
Jul 19 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Who Put Bella in the Wych Elm? @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom

Cathi Unsworth is the author of six pop-cultural crime novels based on real-life unsolved or controversial cases. Her latest, ‘That Old Black Magic’ (Serpent’s Tail), interweaves the true stories of the Hagley Woods mystery of 1943 and the trial of Helen Duncan, the last woman to be prosecuted for witchcraft in the UK, in 1944.

Real life characters mingle with the imagined in a secret history of spiritualists, stage magicians and spooks of all persuasions under the blackout of Britain’s bleakest hours.

Cathy’s book That Old Black Magic will be available on the night.

Jul
29
Sun
Turning The Tide On Plastic
Jul 29 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Turning The Tide On Plastic @ Conway Hall | England | United Kingdom
Sunday 29th July @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Event Navigation

 BOOK NOW

At the current rate pieces of plastic will outnumber fish in the ocean by 2050. That is the legacy we are leaving our children and grandchildren.

Plastic flows into our lives from every direction and most of it is not recycled. Instead it is incinerated or ends up in landfill, where it will sit for hundreds of years, or enters the world’s seas where it fragments into tiny pieces to become microplastics – the environmental scourge of our times.

Many of us had assumed that governments, brands and waste authorities were dealing with plastic on our behalf. But the impact of shows such as Blue Planet along with national beach cleans and high-profile campaigns have resulted in a collective wake-up call.

Journalist, broadcaster and eco lifestyle expert Lucy Siegle provides a powerful call to arms to end the plastic pandemic along with the tools we need to make decisive change. It is a clear-eyed, authoritative and accessible guide to help us to take decisive and effective personal action.

When it comes to single-use plastics, we are habitual users, reaching out for plastic water bottles, disposable coffee cups, plastic straws and carrier bags multiple times a day. If only 12 of us adopt Lucy’s ‘reduce, rethink, refill, refuse’ approach, we could potentially ditch 3K-15K single items of plastic in a year. When we consider our power as influencers – whether at school, the hairdressers, at work or on the bus – we suddenly become part of something significant.

So now is the time to speak up, take action and demand the change you want to see in the ocean, in the supermarket aisles and on the streets. It’s time to turn the tide on plastic, and this talk will help show you how.

Jul
30
Mon
Porphyry’s Letter to Marcella – a guide to the inner and outer life
Jul 30 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Porphyry’s philosophical letter to his wife Marcella is an extraordinary work which offers a range of profound and valuable reflections on living a philosophical life, as well as telling us much about women’s involvement in philosophy. Porphyry wrote this letter to his wife while he was away undertaking important business for the Greeks and, within the letter, he encourages her to be philosophically independent and self-sufficient. Porphyry also draws on Diotima’s speech (in Plato’s Symposium) to encourage Marcella to see philosophy as a path of ascent to the gods. He reflects on what we are as human beings and how we can live the best life possible, even under difficult or challenging circumstances. Exploring the relationship between the soul and the body, the roles of the virtues or excellences in human life, and the nature of reality itself, Porphyry offers Marcella – and his reader in a wider sense – intimate personal reflections and advice on living a philosophical way of life, including how to overcome and move beyond obstacles, distractions and difficulties. We will read an extract from the Letter to Marcella and consider the philosophical way of life encouraged and advised by Porphyry.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Aug
1
Wed
When prophecy fails… again
Aug 1 @ 7:30 pm

The End of the World is announced almost monthly. We remember the dire warnings at the Millennium, and the Mayan calendar of 2012, while the Second Coming of Jesus has been a regular event for centuries. The Maitreya was meant to appear in the East End of London, and our Space Brothers were coming to save the elect in their flying saucers…

These prophecies all have one thing in common. Alternative religions author Dr David V Barrett looks at prophecies of the end of the world and at how prophets cover their embarrassment when nothing happens… again.

Sep
5
Wed
The psychology of conspiracy theories
Sep 5 @ 7:30 pm

Was 9/11 an inside job?  Is climate change a hoax?  Was Princess Diana murdered?  Millions of people appear to think so, disbelieving official explanations for significant events in favour of alternative accounts that are often called ‘conspiracy theories’.  In recent years, psychologists have begun to investigate what makes conspiracy theories appealing to so many people.  In this talk, I will broadly overview what psychologists have found out so far, and will discuss some of my own findings on the causes and consequences of conspiracy theory belief.

Karen Douglas is a Professor in Social Psychology at the University of Kent.  In addition to conducting work on the psychology of conspiracy theories, she is involved in projects examining sexism in language, the influence of sexist ideology on attitudes toward pregnant women, and the psychology of internet behaviour.

Sep
24
Mon
The Course / History of German Art (Tilman Riemenschneider) 1/9
Sep 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Tilman Riemenschneider) 1/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Tilman Riemenschneider (c. 1460 – 1531)

The first lecture will look at Tilman Riemenschneider whose precise record is not known but he was probably born around 1460 at Heiligenstadt im Eichsfeld in present-day Thuringia. Principally a wood carver, we will look at the materials he used and how he came to the trade of sculpting and woodcarving, examine his arrival in Würzburg (at 18) and his itinerant lifestyle. There is scant evidence of this life but we will look at the likely contact and influence of another German artist on his work – Martin Schöngauer, on whose copper engravings he later based his wood carvings.

Oct
2
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Martin Schöngauer)
Oct 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Martin Schöngauer) @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Martin Schöngauer (active 1469; died 1491)

The second lecture in this series will look at Martin Schöngauer who like many Italian Renaissance artists had a background in the goldsmith trade, influenced by his father the goldsmith Caspar Schöngauer. Although there is no precise recording of when he was born it is believed to be in Colmar in 1469. He was known as an engraver and we will look at his most famous works along with his paintings and those of his workshop, examining the dissemination of these and their wider impact on German art.

Oct
3
Wed
Hypnosis: the state of the science
Oct 3 @ 7:30 pm

Hypnosis is a valuable method for studying different facets of conscious awareness yet it continues to be one of the most misrepresented and misunderstood phenomena in psychology. Here I will dispel widespread myths and misconceptions about hypnosis and describe what psychologists, neuroscientists, and clinicians have learned about this fascinating phenomenon.

Devin Terhune is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Goldsmiths, University of London where he studies conscious awareness and its top-down regulation. His primary interests concern the neurocognitive basis of time perception and individual differences in hypnotic suggestibility.

Oct
16
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Albrecht Dürer)
Oct 16 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Albrecht Dürer) @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528)

Here we will explore the early life and works of this precocious youth who was born in Nuremberg in 1471 and examine the enduring influence he had on the Italian Renaissance, not to mention what the Italian Renaissance had on him. The map of Europe was determined by the Holy Roman Empire and the countries we know today were groups of city states which shared aspects of language and culture. Trade between them allowed the spread of goods and ideas to flourish. He was one of the very first artists to write about himself and left a vast body of autobiographical writings, convinced that posterity would be interested in him. He wrote extensively on art practice including treatises on measurement and human proportion in order to educate future German artists because he was determined to counter the view that Germans were “a race of savage drunkards from a wild country with a poor climate, responsible for the destruction of ancient Rome”.

Oct
23
Tue
The Course / The History of German Art (Lucas Cranach the Elder) 4/9
Oct 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of German Art (Lucas Cranach the Elder) 4/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Lucas Cranach the Elder (1472-1553)

Cranach was one of the leading German painters and printmakers of the early 16th century with an incredibly successful workshop. He was the Elector of Saxony’s court painter and the official portraitist of Martin Luther, as well as the Reformation’s chief artist. We will examine Cranach’s output, style of painting and how that style changed as he became more involved with the cause of the Reformation. His altarpieces, Lutheran subject pictures, portraits, as well as mythological works and nudes will all be studied. We will also investigate the success of Cranach among Humanist scholars, rulers, religious leaders and the controversy that still surrounds some of his works.

Oct
30
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Hans Holbein the Younger) 5/9
Oct 30 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Hans Holbein the Younger) 5/9 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Hans Holbein the Younger

Hans Holbein was born in c.1497-8 in Augsburg and was taught by his father, Hans Holbein the Elder. Recommended to the court of Henry VIII by the humanist Erasmus Deriderius, he spent two periods of his life in England (1526-8 and 1532-43), portraying the nobility of the Tudor court. We will look at his work including his most famous portraits, Henry VIII and “The Ambassadors”. The latter, an enigmatic full-length double portrait is a political statement as much as a record of two friends (Jean de Dinteville and Georges de Selve, the Bishop of Lavaur) at a time of turmoil and upheaval (1533) when Henry VIII was seeking to divorce Catherine of Aragon in order to re-marry Anne Boleyn.

Nov
6
Tue
The Course / History of German Art (Adam Elsheimer) 6/9
Nov 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / History of German Art (Adam Elsheimer) 6/9 @ The Course at The University Women's Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers innovative and exciting lectures in Art History, Literature, Music and Opera.

In this series on German Art, we will go from medieval to modern Germany through artists who would come to be a major influence not just on Northern art but also on the Italian Renaissance and ultimately European art. It will begin in the 1460s and demonstrate the interconnectivity of German artists through their itinerancy, their ingenuity, and rigorous work ethic. Each of the weekly lectures will take a look at an individual artist and in so doing take us from the medieval wood carvings of Tilman Riemenschneider, to the Renaissance art of Lucas Cranach the Elder and Hans Holbein the Younger, to the Baroque art of Adam Elsheimer; from Neo-Classicism to Romanticism and finally to German art of the 19th century with its impact on French Impressionism.

Adam Elsheimer (1578-1610)

This painter is often left out of the historical canon of art history or when included is often difficult to place. Adam Elsheimer was born and trained in Frankfurt and almost exclusively worked on a small scale and painted in oil on copper. We will look at his visits to Munich, Venice and Rome and although his output was small, we will look at the influence of these works on more wellknown artists (Rubens, Rembrandt and Claude) and the influence of Renaissance Venetian artists on him (Tintoretto and Veronese). We will also concentrate on his landscapes, religious works and dynamic compositions as well as the spectacular lighting effects that he learned from the work of those Venetian artists

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