Apr
29
Mon
Porphyry and the Philosophic Death
Apr 29 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
Porphyry and the Philosophic Death @ Cecil Sharp House

One of the central themes of Platonic philosophy is the idea of the immaterial soul giving life to the body it occupies, but being “separable” from it – in other words its identity and integrity is not dependent upon the body. In the case of humans, this soul is marked by its ability to both reason and choose to live virtuously: what are the implications of this view? Porphyry in a short work sometimes known under the title “Auxiliaries to the Perception of Intelligibles” discusses important concepts which underlie this view – in what way the soul is attached to the material body; what kind of life leads to our recovery of a full independence; the nature of philosophy and the part it plays in that recovery. We will explore both passages from Porphyry’s treatise and extracts from Plato’s Phaedo – the dialogue which clearly inspired the work.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Apr
30
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Father of the Renaissance) 1/8
Apr 30 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Father of the Renaissance) 1/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Father of the Renaissance

Early discourse and criticism in Italian Art/From Medieval to Renaissance (1300 – 1480)

Art discourse and criticism stretches back to a very early period. In this lecture, we will witness the inception and idea of the Renaissance and the recognition of named artists such as Cimabue and Giotto about whom texts were written. We will look at the most well-known works of both, as well as others, including Pisanello, the Pollaiuolo and Leonardo, drawing on texts from Dante Alighieri, Giorgio Vasari and others.

May
1
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid (1/10)
May 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid (1/10) @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Venus as Travel Guide (Virgil, Aeneid Book i)

Aeneas’s mother is goddess of love, so he has a head start: Venus hears Jupiter prophesy the rise of Rome, so she guides her boy to Carthage where Queen Dido welcomes him in the temple. At dinner, he begins to tell his story. Botticelli, Boucher, Cézanne, Claude, Corot, Correggio, Ingres, Angelica Kauffmann, Reni, Rubens, Tiepolo, Titian, Turner and Zucchi flock to their easels to do it all in colour.

Circular reasoning: The rise of flat earth belief (w/ Michael Marshall)
May 1 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

In 2013, when Michael Marshall first interviewed the Vice President of the Flat Earth society for his show Be Reasonable, people could scarcely believe that anyone could genuinely think the Earth was flat. Five years later, Flat Earth belief has gone mainstream, spawning thousands of hours of YouTube videos, gaining widespread international media coverage, and attracting countless followers. How did we get here?

In this talk, Marshall will talk through his experiences of the Flat Earth movement, take a look at the leaders and some of their reasoning, and report back from the weekend he spent at the UK’s first ever Flat Earth convention.

Michael Marshall is the Project Director of the Good Thinking Society and the Vice President of the Merseyside Skeptics Society. He regularly speaks with proponents of pseudoscience for the Be Reasonable podcast. His work has seen him organising international homeopathy protests, going undercover to expose psychics and quack medics, and co-founding the popular QED conference. He has written for the Guardian, The Times and New Statesman.

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

May
2
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Gold) 1/10
May 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Gold) 1/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Anna Akhmatova

“gold – smells of nothing”

Associated with prosperity, royalty, alchemy, Midas…. gold has an established place in painting and sculpture. Traditionally, gold leaf was made by hammering money into wafer thin leaves, so gilded panels that glowed in candlelit churches would have awed congregations. The Incas believed gold was the sweat of Inti, the sun god. But why did Joseph Beuys paint his face with gold? And what attracted Klimt and the Art Nouveau movement to it? Discover this and how contemporary sculptors like Louise Nevelson who gilded reject furniture into mass totems and Jeff Koons revived the use of gold.

May
7
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Gender, the Body and the Nude) 2/8
May 7 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Gender, the Body and the Nude) 2/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

A Critical Reinvention/Renaissance, Baroque and Impressionism: Kept Behind the Curtain (1500 – 1900)

The nude is still seen in our modern age, and has been for quite some time, as the pinnacle of creative artistic perfection but throughout the course of art history the notion of the perfect body and consequently gender has been constantly reshaped and redefined. Both the female and the male body have been honed and twisted towards an ideal that often defies belief and reality, but how do we define what is a nude and thus art, and what is not, and what was the purpose of this fascination with nudity? This session will trace the critical reinvention of the nude from the Renaissance to the Baroque and on to the modern world of Impressionism. We will hear from German art historians and criticism from the Church.

May
8
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 2/10
May 8 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 2/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

The Trojan Horse, and What Happened Next (ii)

Aeneas transports Dido and us back to the fateful sequence of events when a Greek agent’s deceit and the priest Laocoon’s strangulation by sea serpents finally convince the Trojans to take the horse inside the city of Troy and so unleash their own destruction. The Carracci, El Greco, Fragonard, Guérin, the Mykonos Vase, Raphael, Rosa, Schopin and Tiepolo tell it how it was.

May
9
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Blue) 2/10
May 9 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Blue) 2/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Blue Cennino Cennini

“illustrious, beautiful and most perfect, beyond all other colours”

Ancient Egyptians were unusual for valuing blue so early on. It wasn’t until the C12th in Europe that Abbot Suger, proponent of Gothic architecture, stated blue was divine. Discover how blue went on to become the most venerated pigment in Medieval and Renaissance art and how chemists strove to replace costly lapis lazuli. Why is denim ubiquitous? What made Yves Klein smear his nude models in blue paint? Explore blues through the works of Giotto, Holbein, Titian, Vermeer, Van Gogh, Picasso, Matisse, and Hockney amongst others.

May
13
Mon
Lab Rats: Why Modern Work Makes People Miserable
May 13 @ 7:30 pm – 10:00 pm
Lab Rats: Why Modern Work Makes People Miserable @ The Water Rats

Personality tests. Team-building exercises. Forced Fun. Desktop surveillance. Open-plan offices. Acronyms. Diminishing job security. Hot desking. Pointless perks. Hackathons.

If any of the above sound familiar, welcome to the modern economy. In this hilarious, but deadly serious book, bestselling author Dan Lyons looks at how the world of work has slowly morphed from one of unions and steady career progression to a dystopia made of bean bags and unpaid internships. And that’s the ‘good’ jobs…

With the same wit that made Disrupted an international bestseller, Lyons shows how the hypocrisy of Silicon Valley has now been exported globally to a job near you. Even low-grade employees are now expected to view their jobs with a cult-like fervour, despite diminishing prospects of promotion. From the gig economy to the new digital oligarchs, Lyons deliciously roasts the new work climate, while asking what can be done to recoup some sanity and dignity for the expanding class of middle-class serfs.

Dan Lyons is an author, journalist, and screenwriter. He has co-produced and written for the HBO series Silicon Valley, was technology editor at Newsweek and was the creator of the ground-breaking viral blog “The Secret Diary of Steve Jobs” (AKA “Fake Steve Jobs”). His first book, Disrupted, was a New York Times Bestseller.

His book Lab Rats: Why Modern Work Makes People Miserable will be available on the night.

In support Carmen D’Cruz, aka Carmina Biryana, brings together the oft neglected themes of project management, Croydon based philosophy and hardcore BDSM to the world of comedy.
Be:
– informed
– entertained, and
– inspired to try this at home

May
15
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 3/10
May 15 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 3/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Out of the Burning Fiery Furnace of the City of his Birth (ii)

Cassandra is dragged away, the palace besieged, the Greeks are rampant, King Priam dies, and Venus prevents Aeneas from avenging Troy through killing Helen. Aeneas now knows that the time has come to flee: he carries his old father, leading his wife Creusa and son, Ascanius. But Creusa is lost. Barocci, Batoni, Bernini, Blondel, Claude, Genga, Nanteuil, Vouet and West picture it all.

 

May
16
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Red) 3/10
May 16 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Red) 3/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Red Keith Haring

“Red is one of the strongest colours, it’s blood, it has a power with the eye.”

Pliny said the colour came from the merging of the blood of an elephant and a dragon when they fought. There are myriad reds: alizarin crimson, vermilion, rose madder, Venetian, Indian, iodine scarlet, and cochineal which took the bodies of 80 female beetles, imported from the Americas, to make 1g. Why should waitresses wear red? How did Rothko transform it into the colour of despair? Discover how artists such as JMW Turner used red to enliven their work, and how others like Reynolds and Velasquez saw their reds fade away.

Museums at Night – ‘Candle Lit’ Architectural Tours
May 16 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Thursday 16 & Friday 17 May, 6pm, 7pm & 8pm

The atmospheric rooms of Benjamin Franklin’s only remaining residence will be the feature of this night-time architectural tour, highlighting the original features of our Grade I listed Georgian townhouse in evening light.

£10/per person, drink included

Tickets available via Eventbrite

May
17
Fri
Museums at Night – ‘Candle Lit’ Architectural Tours
May 17 @ 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm

Thursday 16 & Friday 17 May, 6pm, 7pm & 8pm

The atmospheric rooms of Benjamin Franklin’s only remaining residence will be the feature of this night-time architectural tour, highlighting the original features of our Grade I listed Georgian townhouse in evening light.

£10/per person, drink included

Tickets available via Eventbrite

May
20
Mon
Plotinus on Beauty – 1st of two evening sessions
May 20 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plotinus, one of the sages of the Platonic tradition wrote two treatises that explored Beauty (Ennead I, 6 – On Beauty & Ennead V, 8 – On the Intelligible Beauty). Over two successive sessions (20th May and 3rd June) we plan to look at passages from these treatises, and explore some of Plotinus’ questions and themes – What is Beauty? What is the relation of beauty to virtue? How are we to participate in it? How does beauty manifest at different levels? The god-like contemplation of the inner Beauty of the Intelligible world.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

 

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

“No eye ever saw the sun without becoming sun-like, nor can a soul see beauty without becoming beautiful.”

 

May
21
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (The Trouble with Venetian Painting) 3/8
May 21 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (The Trouble with Venetian Painting) 3/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

The Trouble With Venetian Painting

Why the Renaissance could only be a Florentine/Giorgio Vasari and the Critical Appraisal of Venetian Art (1500-1594)

To this very day Florence is not only seen but is the self-proclaimed city of the Renaissance. But how did it receive this exulted status which it so jealously guards? We will look at the powerhouse of Renaissance art that is the city of Venice and why it never historically achieved the same accolade as Florence. We will also look at how art criticism can and did have a profound and long-lasting effect on how Venetian art was and still is perceived.

May
22
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 4/10
May 22 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

The Escape: A Tale of Accidents, Monsters, Landfalls (iii; iv)

Aeneas builds a fleet. They sail to Delos, Crete, the Strophades, Italy and Sicily, and so to Carthage. Dido falls in love with Aeneas, and the gods debate their destiny. The two go hunting and shelter from a storm in a cave whose atmosphere suggests love’s consummation. A. Carracci, Claude, Guignet, Janssens, Thomas Jones, Miel, Morrison, Tiepolo, Tischbein and Turner are visionary here.

May
23
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Green) 4/10
May 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Green) 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Green Leonardo

“Green made of copper, even when this colour is mixed with oil, loses its beauty like smoke if it is not quickly varnished”

The Chinese associate green (and black) with the female Yin – the passive and receiving principle; Islam venerates it as paradise. But what was taboo about green in the Medieval period? And why was green blamed for child death? Discover a host of greens including verdigris, Egyptian and emerald greens and how these were used by Renaissance masters like Duccio and Michelangelo, the Pre-Raphaelite artists, and the Impressionists and post-Impressionists like Cézanne.

May
29
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 5/10
May 29 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

The Work-life Balance Tips towards Destiny and Departure (iv)

The menace of Rumour is abroad. Jupiter sends Mercury to tell Aeneas his duty is to leave Carthage for Italy. Aeneas braces himself to break the news to Dido, whose nightmares now resolve her to die. Mercury visits Aeneas in a dream: he must go now to save his life and those of his companions. Claude is at the scene, as are Dossi, Giacquinto, Manetti, Reni, Tiepolo and Turner.

May
30
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Yellow) 5/10
May 30 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Yellow) 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Richard le Gallienne

“till one comes to think of it, one hardly realizes how important and pleasant things in life are yellow”

Yellow is associated with peace and knowledge in India. But how did it go from being the Imperial colour for the Chinese to a symbol of notoriety in late C19th Europe? Discover the range of yellows from the Indian yellow made from the urine of cows fed only on mango leaves and water to the chrome of Van Gogh’s sunflowers. And learn why Kandinsky included it in his key colours and one of today’s most influential installation artists, Olafur Eliasson, uses it in his practice.

Jun
3
Mon
Plotinus on Beauty 2nd of 2 evening sessions
Jun 3 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plotinus, one of the sages of the Platonic tradition wrote two treatises that explored Beauty (Ennead I, 6 – On Beauty & Ennead V, 8 – On the Intelligible Beauty). This is the second of two evenings (20th May and 3rd June – we will begin this second one with a summary of the main points of the first one) where we plan to look at passages from these treatises, and explore some of Plotinus’ questions and themes – What is Beauty? What is the relation of beauty to virtue? How are we to participate in it? How does beauty manifest at different levels? The god-like contemplation of the inner Beauty of the Intelligible world.

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £3-5 will be welcomed.

 

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

“No eye ever saw the sun without becoming sun-like, nor can a soul see beauty without becoming beautiful.”

Jun
4
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vasari and Michelangelo) 4/8
Jun 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Vasari and Michelangelo) 4/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Giorgio Vasari and ‘The Divine Michelangelo’

The Signature Projects and their critical reception (1494-1564)

In his time, Michelangelo was the most written about artist and also the first to have literature published about him in his own lifetime. We will look at the uneasy relationship between Michelangelo, the artist and Giorgio Vasari, the art historian, as well as others who wrote about him. How did such adulation affect him and his work? We will also look at the development of the man through his most iconic works and evaluate their criticism through writing that survives and is still in publication.

Jun
5
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 6/10
Jun 5 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 6/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

As the Fleet Sails, so Dido’s Pyre is set alight (iv; v)

Dido immolates herself. At sea, Aeneas and his crew look back, see the fire, but do not realize why it is burning. A storm drives them to Sicily, where they visit the tomb of Aeneas’s father Anchises and stage memorial games: sea-racing, athletics, boxing, archery, horsemanship. Trojan women fire the ships. Bourdon, Cayot, Coypel, Fuseli, Guercino, Reynolds, Robson, Rubens, Sacchi, Tiepolo.

…Quack quack here: Pseudoscience in veterinary practice (w/ Dr. Danny Chambers @DannyVet)
Jun 5 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

You may be surprised to hear that the anti-vaccination movement is not restricted to human medicine – animal owners are increasingly turning their back on conventional medicine and seeking out unproven alternatives such as homeopathy or chiropractic – often at the detriment of their animal’s health. You might be even more surprised to learn about the myriad other forms of pseudoscience animals are subjected to, including the common practice of ‘horse psychics’. Danny Chambers will discuss the use of pseudoscience encountered in veterinary practice, and the implications this has on both animal and human health and wellbeing.

Danny grew up on a farm in Devon, graduated from Liverpool Vet School, and has written about and campaigned against the use of pseudoscience in veterinary practice for several years. He was described as the ‘veterinary Ben Goldacre’ at two different conferences recently.

Danny has a particular interest in the concept of ‘One Health’ – the recognition that human and animal health is interlinked, and as a result he has worked on veterinary projects that benefit both human and animal health in India, Iraq, Morocco and The Gambia.

He enjoys mountain biking (badly) and playing the guitar (badly).

Danny occasionally writes for New Scientist magazine.

Twitter – @DannyVet

Instagram – @danny_the_vet

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Jun
6
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (White) 6/10
Jun 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (White) 6/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

White Kandinsky

“White has the appeal of the nothingness that is before birth of the world in the ice age”

We may not consider white a colour now, but it wasn’t always so. The Ancient Romans had two words for it: albus and candidus. Trace the history of lead, zinc, and lime whites, and consider their changing symbolism. How did it come to be associated with authority? Why were polychromed Greek sculptures scrubbed in the C18th? Who were the C19th ‘white painters’? From unicorns to Korean porcelain to Whistler’s women to Agnes Martin’s minimalism to the French performance artist who covered an apartment in toothpaste, discover the enduring appeal of white.

Jun
11
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Caravaggio and Bernini) 5/8
Jun 11 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Caravaggio and Bernini) 5/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

The Rise and Fall in Critical Favour of Caravaggio and Bernini

Taste and the invention of Baroque/An Age of Conspicuous Consumption (1577 – 1680)

What is Baroque and why did it fall so heavily out of favour; a position from which it has, arguably, never recovered? This session will look at Baroque through the prism of two of the most influential Italian artists – Caravaggio and Bernini. It will also look at their most iconic works, their lives and how their works were received within their lifetime and in the decades following their deaths.