Jun
19
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 8/10
Jun 19 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 8/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Even More Momentous Ghosts Now Cross his Path (vi)

In Limbo, Aeneas sees and speaks to Dido. She walks away wordlessly. He meets his comrade-in-arms Deiphobus; is shown the terrors of Tartarus but cannot enter; comes to idyllic Elysium, where his father Anchises prophesies Rome’s future. Then, out through the gate, he returns to the world. Jan Breughel the Elder and Younger, Croce, Dantan, Manfredi and The Master of the Aeneid.

Jun
20
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Orange) 8/10
Jun 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Orange) 8/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Orange Vincent Van Gogh

“There is no blue without yellow and without orange”

A special colour in Buddhist art, till the C16th, orange was referred to as ‘yellow-red’ or ‘saffron.’ But a deep orange chromium from a Siberian mineral was discovered in the C18th. Before that, orange the colour was popular with the sophisticated Ferrara Renaissance painters such as Garofalo and Dosso Dossi. Explore how orange became a fashionable colour from princely orangeries through Frederic Leighton’s Flaming June, Winslow Homer’s and Toulouse-Lautrec’s works.

Artist Talk: ‘On Shahrzad and the Eternal Feminine’
Jun 20 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Artist Talk: 'On Shahrzad and the Eternal Feminine' @ Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art

Doors open 6.30pm, talk begins at 7pm

In this talk, artist Sam Samiee explores themes related to his new installations, The Fabulous Theology of Koh-i-noor and The Fabulous Theology of Darya-i-noor, both 2019, created for the current exhibition at Parasol unit. Referencing the two largest diamonds in the world, Koh-i-noor and Darya-i-noor, Samiee deconstructs and contrasts these fetishized symbols of power and domination to Shahrzad and her sister Dinazad from One Thousand and One Nights.

He asks the question: ‘What would Shahrzad in One Thousand and One Nights do if she had to paint?’

From Bahram Beyzaei’s Geneology of the Ancient Tree to Manichean literature influencing the post-Islamic Persian poetry, Samiee will cover methodologies through which the example of Shahrzad of the One Thousand and One Nights produces a particular mode of being for the artist in which the aesthetics and ethics are of the same category: Adab. Through that one can re-read the world history of visual arts as well as other forms of aesthetics from the point of view of Shahrzad and her ‘feminine-maternal ethical responsibility for the other’.

Sam Samiee is an Iranian painter and essayist based in Amsterdam and Tehran. He has finished a two-year residency program at the Rijksakademie van Beeldende Kunsten in 2015. In his work, Samiee focuses on the practice of painting and research in philosophy, Persian literature, the history of painting and psychoanalysis. Characteristic of his work is the break from the tradition of flat painting and a return to the original question of how artists can represent the three-dimensional world in the space of painting as a metaphor, for a set of ideas. Therefore, most of his works are immersive painterly installations. A comparative readership of the history of Persian literature and western visual art read against the developments of psychoanalysis articulates the fields of Samiee’s interest and art practice. Subjects such as war, history of theology, psycho-geographies of landscapes and epistemic shifts have occupied the artistic explorations of Samiee through his embodiment of traditional and contemporary modes of art production and presentation.

Jun
25
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Hogarth) 7/8
Jun 25 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis (Hogarth) 7/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

Hogarth and the Art of the Conversation Piece and Social Commentary

The impact of Criticism on the work of William Hogarth (1697-1764)

Hogarth is rightly acknowledged to be one of the best loved British artists, but in his day, this was not the case. We will look at the impact of criticism on Hogarth’s work through the pictures which Hogarth referred to as conversation pieces. The lecture will highlight both the positives and negatives which were seen by many as a social commentary while also looking at Hogarth’s own prejudices and how they impacted on his work.

Jun
26
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 9/10
Jun 26 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 9/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

The Landing in Italy, a Latin War, and a Shield from Vulcan (vii, viii, ix)

They pass Circe’s island, reach the Tiber’s mouth, and send an embassy to King Latinus, who offers Aeneas his daughter Lavinia in marriage. Juno and the Fury Allecto goad the Latins, led by Turnus, to war with the Trojans. Aeneas is divinely inspired to seek allies. The Trojan camp is invaded. Bourgeois, Jan Brueghel the Elder, Claude, de Lairesse, del Po, Desprez, Regnault, Serrur, Solimena.

Jun
27
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Black) 9/10
Jun 27 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Black) 9/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Black Hans Arp

“The black grows deeper and deeper darker and darker before me. It menaces me like a black gullet. I can bear it no longer. It is monstrous. It is unfathomable”

One of the most difficult colours to paint with, see how masters such as Frans Hals, Caravaggio, Degas, Goya, Manet, Robert Rauschenberg, Ad Reinhardt, and more succeeded in using black. What did Malevich mean by his iconic ‘Black Square’? How is bone black made? From the drawings of Aubrey Beardsley to the fashions of Coco Chanel, to Picasso’s ‘Guernica,’ and the innovations of Anish Kapoor, see this colour in all its manifestations.

Short film screenings + Q&A with Azadeh Fatehrad + Griselda Pollock
Jun 27 @ 6:30 pm – 8:30 pm
Short film screenings + Q&A with Azadeh Fatehrad + Griselda Pollock @ Parasol unit foundation for contemporary art

Curated by Dr Azadeh Fatehrad + Q&A with Professor Griselda Pollock

Doors open at 6pm. Screening will begin promptly at 6.30pm, followed by a discussion and Q&A at 7.15pm. Light refreshments provided.

Curated by Dr. Azadeh Fatehrad, this screening focuses on experimental film essays produced by Persian female filmmakers. The programme showcases some of the most thought-provoking films that reflect on the traces of memory, history and philosophy in Iranian culture through cinematic syntax, poetry and visual aesthetic. The selected films by Zara Zandieh and Maryam Tafakory look at the duality and shared experience of suffering or pleasure; enforcement and innocence; as well as individuality and universality.

The screening is followed by a discussion with Professor Griselda Pollock and Dr. Azadeh Fatehrad.

Supported by School of Fine Art, History of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Leeds.

Jun
30
Sun
The Perils of Partnership in Public Health
Jun 30 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Should exercise classes be funded by soda companies? Or addiction programmes, by opioid companies? Public bodies across the globe are partnering with corporations to address obesity, the opioid epidemic, and other pressing public health problems. Often, corporate “partners” are contributing to the very problems that governments are trying to solve. We are told industry must be part of the solution. But is it time to challenge that claim?

Jonathan H. Marks argues that public-private partnerships create “webs of influence” that undermine the integrity of public health agencies and distort health policy and research. These collaborations also frame public health problems and their solutions in ways that protect and promote the commercial interests of corporate “partners.” We should expect multinational corporations to develop strategies of influence as far as the law allows. But public bodies can and should develop counter-strategies to insulate themselves from influence.

Marks does not argue that governments are inherently good and corporations inherently evil. Both are capable of good or ill! But, drawing on his legal experience and expertise, he makes a compelling case that they should be kept mainly at arm’s length: separation, not collaboration. He also calls for a new approach in public health that avoids the perils of partnership.

Jonathan H. Marks is a bioethicist and barrister, and the author of The Perils of Partnership: Industry Influence, Institutional Integrity, and Public Health (Oxford University Press, 2019). This book will be available on the day.

He is currently director of the Bioethics Program at Penn State University in the U.S., and an academic member of Matrix Chambers, London and Geneva.

Jul
1
Mon
Platonic Education in the Phaedrus – reading and discussion
Jul 1 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Plato’s understanding of the nature of education is one of the truly liberating doctrines of the ancient world – and one which is largely neglected in modern times to detriment of the individual and global society. “All learning is reminiscence” is its keynote – and Plato explores this starting point as the necessary outcome of conceiving the self to be a soul which has descended into its present embodied form full of innate reasons or ideas. For him and those philosophers who followed the Platonic path, our experiences in the material world are reminders of the great eternal ideas upon which the whole of manifested reality is based; education is the process by which the latent ideas within the self are drawn out into full consciousness and thence into creative activity. We will explore this understanding using passages from the Phaedrus as our starting point. 

No previous experience of formal philosophy is required.

Entrance in free, but donations between £2-5 will be welcomed.

A PDF download of the extract we will be reading is available on our website together with further details of this and other Prometheus Trust’s activities: www.prometheustrust.co.uk (the PDF is on the “London Monday Evenings” page.)

Jul
2
Tue
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis 8/8
Jul 2 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Art & Critical Analysis 8/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

From the earliest times, there has been criticism of art, both positive and negative. A substantial body of text survives and this series will look at a wide variety of European art works in the context of their critical reception. Concentrating on major works and significant artists from 1300 to 1900 and beyond, we will observe the impact on the public’s appreciation of art and how that might be influenced by critical analysis including the vagaries of fashion. What impact did these commentaries have on art practice and the artists themselves and can critics be seen to be responsible for influencing and thus changing the course of art history?

A Catalyst for Change in Art Appreciation

From Pre-Raphaelitism & Ruskin to Impressionism, Modernity & Roger Fry (1848 – 1910)

Revolutionary iconoclasts or traditionalist in disguise? The artists in this final session seem hell-bent on causing offence and to be deliberately counter-culture just for the sake of it. Was this in reality their modus operandi or was there more to it? This session looks at two different approaches to modernity from both sides of the Chanel which changed the course of art history forever. In England, we will look at the Pre-Raphaelites and their relationship with John Ruskin and on the French side of the Chanel, the Impressionists and their critical reception. In both cases, the role of the critic, be it supportive or not, was crucial in establishing the reputation of these groups of artists. This session will also explore the tensions between artists and critics in what would become known as modern painting.

Jul
3
Wed
The Course / The Aeneid 10/10
Jul 3 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Aeneid 10/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

“Our classic, the classic of all Europe, is Virgil”, said T S Eliot in 1944. 75 years on, the UK is scheduled to leave the EU, but not European culture. What better moment could there be to retrace the journey Virgil created for Aeneas: escape from the Trojan inferno, voyage to Carthage, love for Dido, abandonment of her to found a new Troy at Rome, and pilgrimage to the Underworld, a golden bough as passport. Artists picture it all as if they travelled with him.

Aeneas Breaks a Siege and Faces Single Combat (x, xi, xii; the Aeneid’s legacy)

On the battlefield, Evander’s son Pallas is lost to Turnus’s spear. Aeneas kills several Latin chiefs. A truce allows the dead to be buried. Then, in renewed fighting, the Latins lose ground. Aeneas and Turnus meet face to face. Aeneas triumphs. The Aeneid is complete. But what is its legacy to poetry and art? Bazin, Cugnot, Dimier, Falguiere, Giordano, Perrin, and surprise ‘guests’.

Maths, murder, and malaria (w/ Dr. Steven Le Comber @le_comber)
Jul 3 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

Geographic profiling (GP) is a statistical technique originally developed in criminology to prioritise large lists of suspects – often in the tens or hundreds of thousands – in cases of serial murder. GP uses the spatial locations of crime sites to make inferences about the location of the offender’s ‘anchor point’ (usually a home, but sometimes a workplace). The success of GP in criminology has led recently to its application to biology, notably animal foraging (where it can be used to find animal nests or roosts using the locations of foraging sites as input), epidemiology (identifying disease sources from the addresses of infected individuals) and invasive species biology (using current locations to identify source populations). In a talk spanning mathematics, Jack the Ripper and great white sharks, Steve will explain how he used geographic profiling to investigate the identity of the artist Banksy and reanalysed a Gestapo case from the 1940s that formed the basis of a famous novel – and how GP can be used to control outbreaks of diseases such as malaria.

Steven Le Comber is a senior lecturer in the School of Biological and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary University of London. His work covers a wide range of subjects within evolutionary biology, including mathematical and computer models of molecular evolution and studies of spatial patterns in biology. Steve’s work on the mathematics of spatial patterns ranges from the fractal geometry of African mole-rat burrows to epidemiology.

Steve is passionate about science communication, and has given major talks at the Cheltenham Science Festival in the UK, at the Internet Festival in Pisa, Italy and at Ratio in Bulgaria. He has appeared on the BBC and his research has been covered around the world.

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

 

Jul
4
Thu
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Brown) 10/10
Jul 4 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The History of Art in Ten Colours (Brown) 10/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and

Music.Hockney “I prefer living in colours”

The very term ‘colour’ is used differently in the C21st. This course traces the fascinating history of pigments: where they came from, how they were created, and how they have changed the course of art history. It’s a story that will take us from a single mine in Afghanistan to the serendipitous discovery of a fraudulent alchemist in Berlin to a contemporary patent for the blackest black imaginable. We’ll consider both the materiality of colours – for instance, the impact of ‘fugitive’ pigments and dyes that disappear in time – and their shifting symbolism in different cultural contexts. Re-discover paintings you thought you knew by seeing them digitally returned to their ‘real’ colours and forge new connections between artists.

Brown Georgia O’Keeffe (Visit to the National Gallery)

“All the earth colours of the painter’s palette are out there in the many miles of badlands”

The earth pigments are some of the oldest to be used in art, evident in the Cave painters. There are many natural (raw umber, raw sienna) and human-made (burnt umber, burnt sienna) variations. Their versatility, stability, and affordability mean we can enjoy them in the great landscape painters, Dutch and Flemish genre painters like Joachim Beuckelaer, Velázquez, Van Dyck, and masters like Rembrandt who eschewed more expensive pigments in their search for truth. This gallery visit will also be an opportunity to revise our other colours by comparing them ‘in the flesh.’

Jul
10
Wed
A Deadly Potion: John Snow and the Fight Against Cholera
Jul 10 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Cholera outbreak report 1855

Cholera outbreak report 1855

A Royal College of Surgeons event at the London Metropolitan Archives.

When cholera arrived in London in 1831 it spread fast. Doctor John Snow, member of the Royal College of Surgeons and pioneer of anaesthetics, worked out how to stop the disease but his ideas proved too revolutionary for the times.

Speaker: Sandra Hempel

Jul
14
Sun
The Return of Race Science
Jul 14 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
The Return of Race Science @ Conway Hall

Modern science is pivotal in our understanding of race – not because of the lines that thinkers through the centuries have chosen to trace around human groups, but because, once grouped, what they thought belonging to these groups signified.

Join award-winning science writer Angela Saini as she explores the concepts of race and human variation, both past and present. She dissects the political roots of race, why scientists can’t seem to look beyond it, and the dark and dangerous ways in which scientific racism persists to this day.

Dissecting the statements and work of contemporary scientists studying human biodiver-sity, most of whom claim to be just following the data, Angela shows us how, again and again, even mainstream scientists cling to the idea that race is biologically real. As our understanding of complex traits like intelligence, and the effects of environmental and cultural influences on human beings, from the molecular level on up, grows, the hope of finding simple genetic differences between “races”—to explain differing rates of disease, to explain poverty or test scores, or to justify cultural assumptions—stubbornly persists.

Angela Saini is an award-winning science journalist and broadcaster. She regularly pre-sents science programmes on the BBC, and her writing has appeared in New Scientist, the Guardian, The Sunday Times, and Wired.

Her latest book is Superior: the Return of Race Science is published by Beacon Press. Books will be on sale at this event and will be cash or card. Signing by the author after the main event.

Doors 2.45pm. Start 3pm

Jul
24
Wed
The Politics of American Conspiracy Theories (w/ Prof. Joe Uscinski)
Jul 24 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

NB: Please be aware that this Greenwich Skeptics in the Pub talk is not held at its usual time of the first Wednesday of the month.

Particularly since 2016, conspiracy theories became a mainstay of American political debate. Not only did conspiracy theories affect major political decisions (i.e., the election of Trump), but conspiracy theories have become the currency of mainstream political debate. Why has this happened, and what are the measurable effects? What are the dangers of this turn toward dark and disturbing narratives? Professor Uscinski will bring to bear a wealth of polling data from the US to explain how, when, and why conspiracy theories will affect political debate and decision-making. The surprising findings address the following questions: Who believes in conspiracy theories and why? Why are some conspiracy theories more popular than others? What are the dangers of conspiracy theories? Are conspiracy theorists prone to violence? How did conspiracy theories affect the 2016 and 2018 elections? What can conspiracy theories in the United States tell us about conspiracy theories in the United Kingdom?

Joseph Uscinski is associate professor of political science at University of Miami in Coral Gables, FL. He is co-author of American Conspiracy Theories (Oxford, 2014) and editor of Conspiracy Theories and the People Who Believe Them (Oxford, 2018).

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

 

Sep
4
Wed
Cancer cures – are we nearly there yet? (w/ Dr. Alice Howarth)
Sep 4 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

One in two of us will suffer with cancer in our lifetime and almost all of us have some experience of the disease. But do we really know what cancer is and how we can work towards a cure? Is a cure even possible? And how can we arm ourselves with the right information to help us prevent and treat cancer?

Alice is a researcher who works in the Institute of Translational Medicine at the University of Liverpool and has worked with both non-profit and for-profit organisations. In this talk she will discuss what cancer is, how it works and just how we are working towards understanding and curing the disease. She will talk about the complexities of research and some of the big success stories that relate directly to some of the many types of cancer. Only when we understand the difficulties we face can we discern between bogus cancer treatment claims and genuine scientific advancement in this field.

 

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

 

Sep
24
Tue
The Course/Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 1/10
Sep 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 1/10 @ The University Womens Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

 

Introduction and the Court Artist

Why the arts? What is a Prince? Were they all leaders of taste? We begin by exploring some of the key themes and figures of this series before moving on to examine the qualities, experience and identity of the “court artist”.

Sep
25
Wed
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 1/20
Sep 25 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 1/20 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera lectures.

In this series of paired lectures and walks will look at the ways in which particular groups, often professions, have shaped and been shaped by London. Each theme could provide a course of its own, so we will proceed through a series of snapshots at the activities of these groups and individuals at key moments in the formation of the city.

Lecture Immigrants

London is a city of incomers, and has been since its foundation by the Romans nearly two millennia ago. The way Londoners speak, eat, the trades they have practiced and the way they dress have been formed by the crucial additions to the population which have given the city its character.

2 October 2019
 

The week after the lecture, there will be a conducted walk in Spitalfields and nearby, home successively to Huguenots, Jews and Bangladeshis

Sep
26
Thu
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 1/10
Sep 26 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 1/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

Beginnings, Schooling And Influences

We will look at the unconventional circumstances surrounding the birth of Leonardo, his family background, his father’s profession and how that impacted on Leonardo’s early education. We will examine his early training in the Florentine workshop of Andrea del Verrocchio; look closely at the latter’s techniques and working practices, the students who passed through this workshop and what possible impact all this may have had on the future development of Leonardo’s art. We will end with his departure from the Verrocchio workshop.

Oct
1
Tue
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 2/10
Oct 1 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 2/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

The Glory of the Lagoon

Far from the romantic city of our imagination, Renaissance Venice was a superpower feared across the Italian peninsula. Its vast territories gave it unique contact with eastern and western culture which, from Jacopo Bellini to Titian, mingle in the art commissioned by those selected families who vied with each other to provide the next Doge.

Oct
2
Wed
Witchcraft and the Law in England (w/ Deborah Hyde @jourdemayne)
Oct 2 @ 7:30 pm – 8:30 pm

The legal approach to witchcraft in England changed considerably over the course of 700 years, reflecting the philosophy, power struggles and politics of each era. At first deprecated as an ignorant superstition, belief in the power of witchcraft eventually became established – even among the most educated.

Deborah Hyde has been Editor-in-Chief of The Skeptic Magazine for over five years. She speaks regularly at conventions, on podcasts and on international broadcast media about why people believe in the supernatural – especially the malign supernatural – using a combination of history and psychology. She thinks that superstition and religion are natural – albeit not ideal – ways of looking at the world.

Talks are held on the first Wednesday of the month starting at 7:30 pm unless otherwise noted. We meet in the Star and Garter pub, 60 Old Woolwich Road, London SE10 9NY. The Star and Garter pub is close to many transport links and is approximately 7 minutes walk from Maze Hill Overground Station, or 10 minutes walk from the Cutty Sark DLR Station. Although the pub does not serve food, there are plenty of excellent restaurants in Greenwich, including several very nearby on Trafalgar Road. Attendance is free (unless otherwise stated) although a small donation to help cover expenses is appreciated. There is no need to book in advance (again, unless otherwise stated).

For further information, visit http://greenwich.skepticsinthepub.org/ or contact Prof Chris French (email: [email protected]).

NB: You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list (run by Professor Chris French, Head of the Anomalistic Psychology Research Unit, Goldsmiths, University of London) to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of speaker, etc.).

Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

 

Oct
3
Thu
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 2/10
Oct 3 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Leonardo da Vinci: the Life of the Universal Man 2/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

We have all heard of the great master of the Renaissance – Leonardo da Vinci. Speculation regarding the true life and meaning of his work has been rife for centuries. Books such as the Da Vinci Code and many others only serve to confirm and equally to confuse us. So how much do we really know? How did he become such a great artist, how famous was he in his own lifetime, was he rich and where and how did he learn his craft? This series of lectures will give you an insight into the life of this great artist; charting the beginnings of his career, the highs and the lows, and finding out just how and why he became the ultimate and universal genius we now regard him.

Masters At Work: Techniques And Mediums

We will examine Leonardo’s decisions behind his choice of techniques and mediums, including his use of metal point, black chalk, red chalk, pen and ink and wash, and his early use of oil paint. We will look at exquisite examples of all these, asking what were their uses and how they would affect Leonardo’s choices.

Oct
8
Tue
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 3/10
Oct 8 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Princely Patronage in the Italian Renaissance 3/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Started in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera Lectures.

In Princely Patronage, a series of 10 lectures, we will examine how for nearly two centuries, some dozen city states waged war and their leaders competed to create spheres of both authority and magnificence. Artists from Italy and abroad flourished, moving from court to court, sharing influences and creating ever more sumptuous environments. This series examines the role of the ruling families, their spectacular personalities and projects, and the values of the age in driving this artistic flowering.

Splendour in the Marches

Federigo da Montefeltro, Duke of Urbino, was in many ways the ideal Renaissance ruler – courageous soldier, benevolent statesman and cultivated and lavish patron of the arts. We will concentrate on the paintings, architecture, manuscripts and sculpture associated with Federigo, but also cast a glance at his arch‐enemy Sigismondo Malatesta of Rimini, “more wild beast than man”.

Oct
9
Wed
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 3/10
Oct 9 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / London: The People Who Shaped A City 3/10 @ The Course at The University Women's Club

Established in 1994, The Course offers Art History, Literature, Music and Opera lectures.

In this series of paired lectures and walks will look at the ways in which particular groups, often professions, have shaped and been shaped by London. Each theme could provide a course of its own, so we will proceed through a series of snapshots at the activities of these groups and individuals at key moments in the formation of the city.

Lecture Merchants

London is a city conceived for trade. Sited at the lowest easily bridgeable part of the Thames, a conduit leading to the Continent. From Roman times the Port of London was vital to the prosperity of the country at large, and at one stage the Port was the largest in the world. Other forms of trade have also flourished, with London established as a financial centre from the 13th century onwards.

Walk
The week after the lecture (16 Oct) there will be a walk in the City and close to the Thames