Jan
23
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Designs for Living) 7/10
Jan 23 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: A City in Flux (Designs for Living) 7/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.Designs for Living

In the longer post-war period a tougher future emerged. Britain confronted the loss of its historic pre-eminence by trying to embrace the ‘White Heat of Technology’ (London was briefly swinging) before the 1970s brought a new sense of realism about the city’s place in the world.

Jan
24
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Baroque 3/8
Jan 24 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Baroque 3/8 @ The Coure at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

Furniture in the Baroque Age

Furniture came into its own in the seventeenth century when the tradition of cabinetmaking got underway. New types of object reflect dramatically changing life styles; the furnishing of private rooms, for instance, was unprecedented. And exotic materials, such as ebony and turtleshell, reflect Europeans ambitions with regard to the New World.

I’m A Joke And So Are You
Jan 24 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm
I’m A Joke And So Are You @ Conway Hall

Comic Robin Ince uses the life of the stand-up as a way of exploring some of the biggest questions we all face. Where does anxiety come from? How do we overcome imposter syndrome? What is the key to creativity? How can we deal with grief?

What better way to understand ourselves than through the eyes of comedians – those who professionally examine our quirks on stage daily? In this touching and witty book, I’m a Joke and So Are You: A Comedian’s Take on What Makes Us Human, award-winning presenter and comic Robin Ince uses the life of the stand-up as a way of exploring some of the biggest questions we all face. Where does anxiety come from? How do we overcome imposter syndrome? What is the key to creativity? How can we deal with grief?

Informed by personal insights from Robin as well as interviews with some of the world’s top comedians, neuroscientists and psychologists, this is a hilarious and often moving primer to the mind. But it is also a powerful call to embrace the full breadth of our inner experience – no matter how strange we worry it may be!

Robin Ince is co-presenter of the award-winning BBC Radio 4 show, The Infinite Monkey Cage. He has won the Time Out Outstanding Achievement in Comedy, was nominated for a British Comedy Award for Best Live show and has won three Chortle Awards. He has toured his stand up across the world from Oslo to LA to Sydney, both solo and with his radio double act partner, Professor Brian Cox. He is the radio critic for the Big Issue and appears regularly on both television and radio. He has two top-ten iTunes podcast series to his name.

Jan
27
Sun
Thinking on Sunday: Darkness – A Cultural History
Jan 27 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Some are afraid of the dark, others are drawn to its strange domain, delighting in its uncertainties, lured by the call of the mysterious and of the unknown. The history of attitudes to what we cannot quite make out, in all its physical and metaphorical manifestations, challenges the notion that the world is possible to fully comprehend.

Nina Edwards, author of Darkness, a Cultural History, explores darkness as both a physical feature and cultural image, through themes of sight, blindness, consciousness, dreams, fear of the dark, night blindness, and the in-between states of dusk or fog, twilight and dawn, the point or period of obscuration and clarification. Through different historical periods, she interrogates humanity’s various attempts to harness and suppress the dark, from our early use of fire to the later discovery of electricity. She reveals how the idea of darkness pervades art, literature, religion and every aspect of our everyday language.

Nina’s book, Darkness: A Cultural History, shows us how darkness has fed our imagination. Whether a shifting concept or real physical presence, it always conveys complex meaning.

Jan
29
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Dynasties in Transition) 4/10
Jan 29 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Dynasties in Transition) 4/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

In this series of 10, we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.Dynasties in Transition

Dynasties in Transition

Elizabeth I cannily spent much of her time as house guest of her greatest nobles and it was therefore these, rather than the monarch, who were responsible for the most sumptuous buildings of her reign. Before a Civil War put it all under threat, new comforts and sophistication become apparent in silver furniture, the work of foreign artists such as Anthony van Dyck and the plant collections and garden designs of two generations of John Tradescants.

Looking Forward: The Next Ten Years
Jan 29 @ 6:00 pm – 9:30 pm

 

What key aspects of our lives are predicted to shift radically over the next ten years?

As Bloomsbury celebrates ten years of outstanding publishing as Bloomsbury Academic, we’ve invited some of our most fascinating authors to fill us in on the opportunities, challenges and biggest changes coming to our lives in the next ten years.

Come along as our experts present their most ground-breaking ideas in the Humanities and Social Sciences in a series of short talks, and group discussion, to tell us what lies ahead. Their collective years of research and writing means we’ll all benefit from their educated insights into the future of our world.

Covering sustainability, terrorism, geopolitics, gender, religion, education and philosophy – what are the key issues and how can we prepare for the changes and challenges that lie ahead? Come with us as we aim beyond the regular predictions and leave you thinking differently about our shared future.

Event Speakers:

  • Rachel Reeves MP
  • Kerry Brown
  • Julia Ebner
  • Dr. Leslie Davis Burns
  • James G. Crossley
  • Constantine Sandis
  • Viv Ellis

Our speakers will each deliver a short talk and then take part in a live Q&A panel, hosted by Jamie Bartlett, author of Radicals and The People vs. Tech, tech blogger and Director of the Centre for the Analysis of Social Media for cross-party think-tank Demos in conjunction with The University of Sussex.

We hope to see you there. Take advantage of places for just £8.00 if you book your place before Friday, November 30th

Pseudoscience, public health and the justice system (w/ Pamela Radcliffe)
Jan 29 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

This talk presents an overview of pseudoscience within therapeutic contexts in the twenty-first century, juxtaposed with the risks posed to public health and the criminal justice system. It identifies the adverse outcomes that may arise from specific psychotherapeutic treatments and popular pseudo-scientific beliefs. The justice response and published cases are briefly explored. This talk concludes by advancing the case for increased therapeutic regulation and justice safeguards.

Pamela Radcliffe is a senior barrister, Lead Editor of Witness Testimony in Sexual Cases: Evidential, Investigative, and Scientific Perspectives, OUP (2016), and Visiting Research Fellow at Portsmouth University, Psychology Department.

Called to the Bar in 1979, Pamela’s legal practice has spanned all aspects of family and criminal law (defending). She conducts independent case reviews and has assisted university innocence networks where miscarriages of justice are alleged or suspected. Pamela’s academic interest lies in the interdisciplinary nature of the law, and the nexus between medicine, psychology and law, especially the justice challenges posed by non-recent sexual complaints and controversial psychotherapeutic treatments. Pamela delivers lectures and workshops to universities and to justice and health professionals on witness testimony related issues.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Jan
31
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Silver 4/8
Jan 31 @ 12:45 pm – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) Silver 4/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

The Art and Craft of the Silversmith

Because the very materials of gold and silver were used as currency for much of their history, the status of goldsmiths was always high and their products were often splendid. But precisely because silver objects were often regarded as a form of money, they were frequently melted down in times of need. The legacy of goldsmiths throughout the ages is intertwined with the history of aristocratic taste and patronage.

Feb
5
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Privacy and Palladianism) 5/10
Feb 5 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Privacy and Palladianism) 5/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this series of 10, when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

 

Privacy and Palladianism

The great Palladian houses of the 18th century represent a revolution in lifestyle as much as in architecture. Graceful and essentially rural, they combine elegance with the possibility of intimacy, comfort with a managed offer of sophisticated activities. Against a background of upheaval in France and the agricultural revolution in England, the revolution in gardening is no less profound – from geometry to the “natural” landscapes of Capability Brown.

Torture – Does it work and can it ever be justified? (w/ Jo Kenrick)
Feb 5 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

What if there was a dirty bomb hidden somewhere in the UK and you had to get a suspect to tell you where it was and how to disable it, what lengths would you go to? Recent revelations in the media about the UK government’s role in cooperating with the CIA torture programme have re-opened the debate on what is and is not acceptable when innocent lives are at stake. The President of the United States has declared that torture ‘absolutely works’ but the CIA’s own reports state that torture techniques “do not produce intelligence” and “will probably result in false answers”. This talk examines the ethical arguments for and against torture and reviews the science behind what techniques do and don’t work in eliciting information in high-pressure situations.

Jo Kenrick is a member of the Forensic Psychology Unit and an Associate Lecturer at Goldsmiths where she is researching the development of deceptive skill for her PhD. She has a wide range of research interests as you can see by her previous dissertation topics  –“Let the traffic policeman wear black cotton gloves”: Why traditional rituals of death matter to modern people (BA, Religious Studies), One born every minute: A target selection hypothesis of deception abilities in Machiavellian personalities (BSc, Psychology) and The influence of information channels on attributions for Domestic Violence against Women in Sweden, Bulgaria and the UK (MSc, Research Methods).

This event is jointly hosted with Goldsmiths’ Forensic Psychology Unit.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Feb
6
Wed
The Course / 20th Century London: a City in Flux (The New Historicisms) 8/10
Feb 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / 20th Century London: a City in Flux (The New Historicisms) 8/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in art history, literature and music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

The New Historicisms

The last quarter of the 20th century was among the more paradoxical periods in the city’s history. Run by a left-wing council, many images of the city projected to the world were of highly traditional events: The Silver Jubilee, the Marriage of Prince Charles and Princess Diana. The transformations of the fabric of the city could be equally paradoxical: modernity in a (partly) traditional dress.

Feb
7
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) 18th C France 5/8
Feb 7 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) 18th C France 5/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

Pleasure and Sensation in 18th Century France

This talk will focus on the golden age of French interiors, exploring how new sensibilities among the Parisian nobility required a new style of living, a development that gave rise to some of the most delicious and fanciful pieces of furniture, silver and porcelain ever made.

Feb
10
Sun
Depression in a Digital Age – The Highs and Lows of Perfectionism
Feb 10 @ 3:00 pm – 4:30 pm
Depression in a Digital Age – The Highs and Lows of Perfectionism Conway Hall

Fiona Thomas grew up without an iPhone, used actual landlines to make calls, and didn’t have Facebook during her adolescent years. But though her childhood took place in an analogue world, she found herself suffering from the same problems many young people face today; the race for perfectionism, high levels of anxiety, a fear of success.

After an unfulfilling university experience, a stressful beginning in a management career, and a severe case of impostor syndrome, Fiona suffered a nervous breakdown in her mid-twenties. Amongst therapy and medication, it was the online community which gave Fiona the comfort she needed to recover.

Fiona traces her life dealing with anxiety and the subsequent depression, and how a digital life helped her find her community, find her voice, find herself.

Fiona remains an active blogger, writer and influencer in the mental health community. She has written for MindHeads TogetherHealthlineMetro and The Huffington Post. In an increasingly heated discussion about mental health and the internet, Fiona offers a different, positive perspective. This is the author of Depression in a Digital Age – The Highs and Lows of Perfectionism which shall be available on the day.

Feb
12
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (A Consumer Culture) 6/10
Feb 12 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (A Consumer Culture) 6/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this series of 10, we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

A Consumer Culture

New houses require new furnishings, and the Grand Tour was the perfect opportunity to acquire great collections – statuary, paintings and decorative arts reflecting a society desperate for cultural status. Side by side with this, stars of the Industrial Revolution like Josiah Wedgwood and Thomas Chippendale were developing a dazzling range of affordable new products for the rising and aspirational middle classes.

Feb
14
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) The Industrial Revolution 6/8
Feb 14 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts of Europe (1500-2000) The Industrial Revolution 6/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

The Industrial Revolution & the Decorative Arts

The Industrial Revolution had a profound impact on the decorative arts, bringing objects that had previously been associated with the nobility within reach of the ever growing middle-class. Radical new inventions and techniques reduced the cost of manufacturing products, leading to the evolution of shops and entrepreneurs, which led in turn to completely new attitudes towards taste.

Feb
18
Mon
Perils of Perception – Why We’re Wrong About Nearly Everything
Feb 18 @ 7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

Do you eat too much sugar? Is violence in the world increasing or decreasing? What proportion of your country are Muslim? What does it cost to raise a child? How much do we need to save for retirement? How much tax do the rich pay?

When we estimate the answers to these fundamental questions that directly affect our lives, we tend to be vastly wrong, irrespective of how educated we are. This landmark book – informed by over ten exclusive major polling studies by IPSOS across 40 countries – asks why in the age of the internet, where information should be more accessible than ever, we remain so poorly informed.

Using the latest research into the media, decision science, heuristics, and emotional reasoning, Bobby Duffy examines why the populations of some countries seem better informed than others, and how we can address our ignorance of key public data and trends. An essential read for anyone who wants to be smarter and better informed, this fascinating book will transform the way you engage with the world.

Bobby Duffy is Managing Director of the Ipsos MORI Social Research Institute and Global Director of Ipsos Social Research Institute. He leads a team of around 200 researchers across the World. He has been previously seconded to the British Prime Minister’s Strategy Unit and to the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE) at the LSE. He is Visiting Senior Research Fellow at King’s College London.

Feb
19
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Antique or Exotic?) 7/10
Feb 19 @ 12:45 pm – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (Antique or Exotic?) 7/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this 10 part series we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

Antique or Exotic?

The development of Bath, Buxton and other spa towns, the London buildings of John Nash, brings classical discipline to centres of fashionable society, and new public parks provide spaces for health and stylish promenades. But the Age of Reason also provokes a revolt in the form of fantasy projects drawing on influences from Indian to Gothic.

Feb
20
Wed
The Course/20th Century London: a City in Flux (The Big Bang) 9/10
Feb 20 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/20th Century London: a City in Flux (The Big Bang) 9/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in art history, literature and music.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

The Big Bang

In one field the transformation of the economic life of the city was explosive. The City of London abandoned the traditional trappings of the banking industry and adopted a brash new persona and once again it was transformed by a wave of new buildings, including an extraordinary extension into what was once London’s docklands.

Feb
21
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts in Europe (1500-2000) 19th Century 7/8
Feb 21 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts in Europe (1500-2000) 19th Century 7/8 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

Design Reform in the 19th Century

The Industrial Revolution transformed the world but, in the 19th century, some critics and commentators maintained that it also led to lower quality products and poor conditions for workers, and they called for reforms. This talk will discuss attempts to reinvest the world of commodities with dignity and propriety – for instance through the Arts and Crafts Movement and the Aesthetic Movement – as the modern world unfolded.

 

Feb
26
Tue
The Course / Homes and Gardens (The Victorians) 8/10
Feb 26 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / Homes and Gardens (The Victorians) 8/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this 10 part series we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

The Victorians

Under Queen Victoria the Empire prospered, and provided exciting furnishings and plant species, staff were plentiful and the vast interiors were made more liveable by new technologies, such as electricity. For the “have-nots”, though, the reality could be a festering urban slum from which only cafes, bars and pubs provided escape.

Dreaming and memory consolidation (w/ Prof. Mark Blagrove @Mark_Blagrove)
Feb 26 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

There is considerable research on how REM sleep and Slow Wave Sleep are related to memory consolidation. These consolidation processes prioritize emotional and salient memories. Dreaming also incorporates emotional memories from waking life, and so it has been proposed that dreaming reflects functional neural processes during sleep. Arguments in favor and against this possibility will be explored. That dreams refer to waking life experiences in an associative or metaphorical manner has been seen to be a result of processes of linking new memories to established memories, guided by emotions common to each. That we are embodied in the dream, in a simulation of the waking world, may be required for full processing of emotions, or may have another, practice-based virtual reality function. Separate from the debate on dream function is the debate on whether the consideration of dreams by the dreamer, when awake, can elicit insight. This possibility is supported by the finding that dreams preferentially incorporate emotional experiences and refer to them metaphorically. Designs for testing this against the null hypothesis, that dreams do not tell us anything new, will be discussed.

NB: Preceding his talk (from 5 pm to 6 pm in Room 219A of the Richard Hoggart Building), Mark Blagrove will run an experiential Ullman dream appreciation group with artwork produced so as to revisit the dream. Note that, although there is no need to book, places on this workshop are limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Professor Mark Blagrove researches the memory consolidation functions of sleep, the relationship of dreaming to memory consolidation and to waking life events and concerns, and the effects on the dreamer and on listeners of considering and discussing dream content.

Recent publications:

  • Comparing personal insight gains due to consideration of a recent dream and consideration of a recent event using the Ullman and Schredl dream group methods. Frontiers in Psychology, 2015, 6, 831.
  • The dream-lag effect: Selective processing of personally significant events during Rapid Eye Movement sleep, but not during Slow Wave Sleep. Neurobiology of Learning and Memory 2015, 122, 98-109.
  • Sleep-dependent memory consolidation is related to perceived value of learned material. Journal of Sleep Research, 2017, 26, 302 – 308.
  • Incorporation of recent waking-life experiences in dreams correlates with frontal theta activity in REM sleep. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2018, 13, 637-647.
  • Insight from the consideration of REM dreams, Non-REM dreams and daydreams. Psychology of Consciousness (APA) (in press)

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Feb
28
Thu
The Course / The Decorative Arts in Europe (1500 -2000) The Bauhaus and Beyond 9/9
Feb 28 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course / The Decorative Arts in Europe (1500 -2000) The Bauhaus and Beyond 9/9 @ The Course at The Universsity Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting Art History, Literature and Music lectures.

In this 8 part series, we will see how in the European tradition, the status of “fine art” tends to be much higher than that of the “decorative arts” though the beauty and virtuosity of the latter can be spell-binding. This is why we have a “temple” to fine art in the centre of London – the National Gallery – while “everything else” is in the Victoria and Albert Museum – which was on the fringes of London when it was built. The difference is also reflected in the huge gap between the market prices of the two arts. Why are the decorative arts undervalued in this way and what are their virtues? This series of lectures explores this intriguing subject.

Modernist Design: the Bauhaus and Beyond

The Bauhaus was the most innovative and influential school of design in the 20th century, combining avant-garde ideas about abstract art with a thoroughly conscientious approach to social reform and domestic living. Employing some of the most celebrated artists of the 20th century, the school combined an interest in nature with faith in industrial design.

Mar
5
Tue
The Course/Homes and Gardens (You Just Can’t Get the Staff …” 9/10
Mar 5 @ 10:45 am – 10:45 am
The Course/Homes and Gardens (You Just Can't Get the Staff ..." 9/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

Established in 1994, The Course offers exciting lectures in Art History, Literature and Music.

In this 10 part series we ask when does a house become a “home”? When does a food plot become a “garden”? How do staircases and corridors reflect a new way of life? From the defensive architecture of the moat and keep to the 21st century urban fortresses of glass and concrete, from the monastic herbal garden to Chelsea show gardens for the urban terrace, we look not only at buildings, interiors and nature but, above all, at what they tell us about how people use their spaces to manage their lives.

“You Just Can’t Get The Staff……”

The 20th C begins with the Edwardian heyday of country house living and moves to the 1974 V&A exhibition, “The Destruction of the Country House”, which recorded the loss of some 1000 country houses in barely a century. Sustained for a while by American heiresses and the commercial classes, rural and aristocratic dominance collapses and the emphasis shifts to the demands of industry, the city and the middle classes.

“I see what the killer sees”: An examination of Psychic Criminology (w/ Ciaran O’Keeffe @ciaranokeeffe)
Mar 5 @ 6:10 pm – 7:10 pm

There is a disconnect between the proliferation of psychic detectives throughout media who claim successful involvement in criminal investigations and the experimental work on psychic detection that consistently finds little evidence that would warrant their involvement. There is, however, a paucity of scientific work in this domain, with the main sceptical rebuttals being confined to arguments around cold (or hot) readings or florid exaggeration of the claims. Critical evaluation of psychic detection, then, must come from detailed post-hoc investigations and in recognising how different police forces respond to volunteered information from a psychic. This talk encapsulates all of the above points, highlighting key famous cases in the domain, and bringing together two normally disparate sub-disciplines of Psychology: Investigative Psychology and Parapsychology.

Dr O’Keeffe is Associate Head of School at Bucks New University where he is responsible for Psychology, Sports Science, Social Sciences, Education and Sports Therapy. He is also programme leader for two crime degrees, BSc. (Hons) Criminological Psychology and BSc. (Hons) Psychology & Criminology, which build upon his professional and research experience in Forensic Psychology (risk assessment of violent young offenders; Investigative Psychology consultancy; anti-FGM campaigner, RJ advocate). His parapsychology research, however, has focused on testing mediums and psychics in the lab and also fieldwork examining ghostly experiences. Additional research has included psychic criminology, UFOs, Alien Abduction and ‘Christian’ parapsychology (i.e. exorcism, miracles & stigmata). It has been reported in The Psychologist, The Times, The Independent, in addition to various TV documentaries, and docutainment programmes, on a number of channels (BBC, ITV, C4, C5, Living TV, Yesterday, Travel Channel, Discovery etc.). He has also provided accounts of his daily activities in order to inform the lead (Andrew Lincoln, now on AMC’s “The Walking Dead”) in a popular ITV paranormal drama, Afterlife. Ciaran also provides a sceptical voice to various paranormal shows (e.g. Living’s Most Haunted, and Jane Goldman Investigates) in addition to providing expert input on Applied Psychology. He has been involved in many unusual projects: physiological effects of infrasound (Royal Festival Hall); ghost investigation of Hampton Court Palace; an exorcism ‘training day’; and lie detecting for the film Spy Game.

All APRU talks are open to staff, students and members of the public. Attendance is free and there is no need to book in advance. You are strongly recommended to register (at no cost) with the APRU’s “Psychology of the Paranormal” email list to ensure that you are informed of any future changes to the programme as well as news of related events. You can also follow @chriscfrench on Twitter for announcements (including news of last-minute cancellations, changes of venue, etc.). Visit: http://www.gold.ac.uk/apru/email-network/

Mar
6
Wed
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Millenial Fever) 10/10
Mar 6 @ 10:45 am – 12:45 pm
The Course/20th Century London: A City in Flux (Millenial Fever) 10/10 @ The Course at The University Womens Club | England | United Kingdom

The Course offers exciting lectures in art history, music and literature.

London has transformed almost unrecognisably since 1900. At the beginning of the period the capital of a truly global empire and its largest port. At the end, the centre of one of the world’s most cosmopolitan societies, a great financial centre and a cultural hub. This twenty part series of lectures and walks will trace the forces that transformed London, from Imperial pomp through wartime catastrophe, to the vibrant but nervous metropolis of the 21st century.

Millenial Fever

The approach of a new millennium, and the appearance of the heritage lottery fund, which started in 1994, transformed the face of London, turning previously unregarded areas into cultural centres and paving the way for the rapid changes in the social character of many areas of London which are continuing to this day.